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York College 



OF PENNSYLVANIA 



College Catalog 

2009-201 1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/yorkcollegeofpenv55york 




1 



H York College 

^^^r OF PENNSYLVANIA 



A COEDUCATIONAL COLLEGE GRANTING 

ASSOCIATE, BACCALAUREATE AND MASTER'S DEGREES 



GENERAL CATALOG 2009-2011 
Volume LV 



Published by 

York College of Pennsylvania 

York, Pennsylvania 17403-3651 




ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIP 



Accredited by: 

The Commission on Higher Education, Middle States Association of 

Colleges and Schools 
3624 Market Street. Philadelphia, PA 19104 (215) 662-5606 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 
Council on Accreditation, National Recreation and Park Association 
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 
Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care 
Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (Mechanical Engineering 

Computer Science) 
Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Program 

Approved by: 

The Pennsylvania Department of Education 

The Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing 

Department of Education for Training Veterans 

Pennsylvania Board of Licensure for Nursing Home Administrators (NHA) 

Membership in: 

American Association of Colleges of Nursing 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers 

American College Public Relations Association 

American Health Care Association 

Association of American Colleges 

Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania 

College and University Public Relations Association of Pennsylvania 

College Entrance Examination Board 

Council for the Advancement and Support of Education 

Council of Independent Colleges 

Field Institute for Technology in Nursing Education 

Middle Atlantic Association of Schools of Business 

Marine Science Consortium 

National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 

National Association of College Admissions Counselors 

National Commission on Accrediting, Inc. 

National League for Nursing 

National Recreation and Parks Association 

Northeast Association of Pre-Law Advisors 

Pennsylvania Association of Administration of Justice Education 

Pennsylvania Association of College Admissions Counselors 

Pennsylvania Association of Graduate Schools 

Pennsylvania Health Care Association 

Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society 

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators 

Potomac Chesapeake Association of College Admissions Counselors 






CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 



- ":2ajtKK3?Ak??r L-u..".-, 



College Policy 

Academic Matters 

Admissions 

Alumni Affairs 

General College Information 

Business Matters 

Charitable Gifts 

Scholarships. Student Aid 

Student Affairs 

Transcripts/ Academic Records 



Dr. George W. Waldner, President 

Dr. William T. Bogart, Dean of Academic Affairs 

Mrs. Nancy C. Spataro, Director of Admissions 

Mr. Bruce Wall. Director of Alumni Affairs 

Ms. Mary Dolheimer, Assistant Dean of College 
Advancement 

Mr. C. Matthew Smith. Dean of Business Affairs 

Mr. Dan Helvvig. Dean of College Advancement 

Mr. Calvin H. Williams, Financial Aid Officer 

Mr. Joseph F. Merkle, Dean of Student Affairs 

Mrs. Debra L. Shimmel. Recorder 



The address for all of the persons listed above is: 

York College of Pennsylvania 

York, Pennsylvania 17403-3651 

Telephone: (717) 846-7788 

OR visit our website @ www.ycp.edu 

Visitors: York College welcomes visitors. Office hours during the academic year 
(September through Spring Commencement) are 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. During 
the summer most offices close at 1 1 :30 a.m. on Friday. The reception desk is open from 
9 a.m.-l p.m. Saturdays. Please request appointments with the Director of Admissions 
well in advance. 

Rules: Students are governed by the rules, regulations, and provisions included in this 
publication. The College reserves the right to withdraw or modify any course. 

The General Catalog of York College presents essential information on institutional 
purposes, programs, faculty, extracurricular activities, facilities, and costs. It is 
designed to assist prospective students in deciding whether York is the right place for 
them to pursue their educational goals and to provide a ready reference for enrolled 
students. 

Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the 
time of publication . the College reserves the right to change any provisions , regulations 
or requirements set forth within, without notice or obligation. 



York College of Pennsylvania does not discriminate because of race, color, 
religious creed, ancestry, national origin, gender, disabilities or age in employment 
procedures or in recruitment and acceptance of students. 







R3 York College 

^^^r OF PENNSYLVANIA 



CONTENTS 



MESSAGE FROM GEORGE W. WALDNER, PRESIDENT 5 

INSTITUTIONAL OVERVIEW, HERITAGE, MISSION, AND GOALS 6 

LOCATION 12 

FACILITIES 13 

STUDENT LIFE 16 

ADMISSIONS AND FINANCES 26 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS INFORMATION 46 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 70 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 319 

ROSTERS 474 

CALENDARS 511 

INDEX 513 






A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 



York College of Pennsylvania is a community of learners and learning, whose members 
share the common bond of active participation in academic and campus life. At York, 
we believe the collegiate experience at its best is a comprehensive process of holistic 
personal development, which prepares graduates for productive roles in society, while 
facilitating their growth as individuals and lifelong learners. The hallmark of the York 
experience is excellence in professional preparation. 

York is a venerable educational institution, tracing its heritage back to the early 
years of the American republic. Throughout its long history, York's commitment has 
been to provide high-quality, affordable educational programs that prepare leaders for 
meaningful professional roles in, business, government, healthcare, industry, science, 
social service, and the arts. 

York College has achieved recognition in the Middle Atlantic region and at the 
national level for excellence in its academic programs and for its commitment to 
affordability. As a relatively large college (more than 4,600 full-time students), York 
represents a "golden mean" in higher education, combining the broad academic 
resources and extra-curricular opportunities of a fine university with the community 
spirit and personal attention of a small college. 

I hope your experience at York College is a fulfilling one. We of the faculty and staff 
are ready to help you attain your academic goals and plan for a successful future. 



George W. Waldner, President 





Introduction 



INSTITUTIONAL OVERVIEW, HERITAGE, MISSION, AND GOALS 



OVERVIEW 



York College of Pennsylvania is a private-sector, independent institution of higher 
education, which focuses on offering baccalaureate degree programs in the arts and 
sciences, as well as professional programs. Students may also enroll in programs 
leading to the associate degree and the master's degree in selected professional fields. 

The College draws its 4,600 full-time undergraduate and 800 part-time and 
graduate students from some 30 states and 15 foreign countries. Typically, 45% of 
York's freshmen hail from Pennsylvania, 20% from Maryland, 15% from each of the 
states of New Jersey and New York, and strong contingents from Virginia. Delaware, 
Connecticut, and other states. 

The College occupies a 190-acre, park-like, suburban campus, in the rolling hills 
of the south central part of the state. York is an economically vibrant area, with a solid 
industrial base as well as productive service and agricultural centers. Close to the heart 
of "Pennsylvania Dutch" country and the spectacular Susquehanna River recreation 
area, York is one hour from Baltimore, two hours from Philadelphia or Washington, 
D.C., and four hours from New York City, Pittsburgh, or Richmond. Nearly half of its 
undergraduate students reside in college housing; others commute from their homes or 
live in rental housing in the vicinity of the campus. 

York College envisions itself as a center of affordable academic excellence, and 
has consistently received favorable regional and national recognition for its success in 
offering a program of high quality at a tuition rate substantially lower than institutions 
of similar type, scope, and distinction. York's effective control of tuition costs stems 
from its dedication to efficiency and from the long-term, generous support of the 
College by its friends in the York community and its alumni. This support has provided 
both superior physical facilities and permanent endowment resources sufficient to fund 
institutional scholarships and financial aid for needy students. York uses this fiscal 
strength in turn to provide a kind of "scholarship" to each of its students, in the form of 
relatively modest charges for tuition and campus housing. 

York College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Schools, and has specialized accreditation for its 
business, engineering, nursing, allied health, and recreation programs. Certification 
programs in education have been approved by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education. 



Institutional Profile, Mission, and Goals 



HERITAGE 



York College of Pennsylvania traces its institutional lineage to the York County 
Academy, which received its charter from the General Assembly of Pennsylvania 
on September 20, 1787, for the purpose of offering courses of instruction in "the 
learned and foreign languages, English, mathematics, and other useful branches of 
literature." The Reverends John Andrews and John Campbell of St. John's Episcopal 
Church played leading roles in the Academy's establishment and the early years of its 
operation. For well over a century the York County Academy functioned as a center of 
classical studies and the fine arts, educating thousands of persons who became leaders 
in local and national affairs as well as in the professions of education, medicine, and 
law. 

In 1 929 , the Academy merged with the York Collegiate Institute , a nondenominational 
sister institution that had been founded in 1873 by Samuel Small, a prominent 
businessman and philanthropist. In 1941 , the trustees accepted the recommendation of 
the Institute's president. Dr. Lester F. Johnson, that the charter be amended to provide 
for a two-year program at the junior college level. The new institution adopted the 
name York Junior College and appointed Dr. Johnson as its first president. In the 
1950s, the Junior College outgrew its physical facilities in the center of downtown 
York, and its academic capabilities advanced beyond the boundaries of a tv/o-year 
program. Through the generosity of the trustees and other community leaders, a 57- 
acre site for a new campus was acquired and fund raising began to construct an entirely 
new and larger complex of campus buildings. In October of 1965, the new campus 
was dedicated, with words of commendation from then-Governor Scranton that the 
splendid new buildings testified to "private support and self-help at the local level." 
The nevk' facilities, along with yet another successful capital campaign, also made 
feasible the extension of the curriculum to a full bachelor's degree program in 1968, 
leading once again to a change in the institution's name, this time to York College of 
Pennsylvania. 

In the last forty-one years the College has continued its advancement as a center 
for learning, scholarship, public service, and cultural affairs. Curricular resources have 
grown notably, providing increasingly diverse and sophisticated educational offerings 
that compare favorably with those of many universities. Campus acreage and facilities 
have expanded dramatically. Total enrollment now exceeds 5 ,000, with students coming 
from a widening geographic sphere. Yet, the full-time undergraduate enrollment of 
about 4,600 students, the emphasis on teaching excellence, and the increasingly high 
proportion of students residing on campus permit the preservation of the personal 
collegiate atmosphere that has characterized the York educational experience for more 
than two hundred years. 



8 introduction 



MISSION OF THE COLLEGE 



To make available, at the baccalaureate and associate degree levels, high-quality 
academic programs, which include general education components appropriate for the 
program's degree level and which cover a broad range of majors in professional and 
career fields as well as the arts and sciences; 

To offer carefully selected master's degree programs, which reflect the enrollment 
emphases of the undergraduate curriculum and the professional development needs of 
the region; 

To create a teaching and learning environment characterized by individual attention 
to students, high-quality classroom instruction, thoughtful application of relevant 
technology, encouragement of lifelong learning, attention to critical thinking skills, 
and strict adherence to principles of academic honesty; 

To provide York College's educational programs with a superior degree of efficiency, 
in order to maintain the lowest feasible costs for students; 

To attract applications from students from a variety of social, economic, and 
geographic backgrounds, playing a special role in addressing the higher education 
aspirations of the people of York County; 

To enroll principally students whose academic preparation places them in the broad 
middle to above-average range of applicants for their intended degree programs, while 
remaining open to accepting some students who have demonstrated the capacity and 
motivation to succeed, even though they have not yet fully achieved their academic 
potential; 

To provide educational opportunities for traditional-age, adult, full-time, and part- 
time students; 

To facilitate the holistic development of students who devote full-time to their 
collegiate experience through their active participation in campus life; 

To build and sustain a stimulating campus community that engages student interest 
and involvement in cultural, spiritual, sports, and recreational programs; 

To provide appropriate enrichment activities for part-time and adult learners; and 

To place at the service of the community to the extent feasible the College's human 
and cultural resources and educational facilities. 



Institutional Profile, Mission, and Goals 



GOALS OF THE COLLEGE 



Outcomes Assessment 

General education curricula, majors, and minors will reflect the Institution's mission 
and each will be defined in terms of intended learning outcomes; ongoing monitoring 
of educational results shall be conducted, with the information obtained used to 
improve and revise relevant academic programs. 

Other functional areas of College operations — library/learning resources, student 
affairs, business affairs, plant operations, athletics, fundraising. alumni affairs, career 
services, admissions, and communications — will also be directed to attain outcomes 
defined in relation to institutional mission and goals, and will be monitored and 
improved in response to the results attained. 

Academic Programs 

The College will develop new programs consistent with the College's mission, 
regional economic development needs, and student interests, within the limits of 
available resources. While the principal program emphasis is on campus-based credit 
courses, the College seeks to be responsive to requests for academic experiences to 
be held off-campus, as faculty resources are available through the relevant academic 
departments. 

Academic requirements are the same for all matriculated day and evening students, 
in their respective degree programs. All programs, including those offered off-campus 
or in conjunction with other institutions, maintain academic integrity consistent with 
the College's standards. 

Faculty 

York College is a student-centered, teaching institution. Accordingly, most of a 
faculty member's time should be allocated to class preparation and instruction, the 
evaluation of student work, and academic advising. The College encourages the 
scholarly development of faculty members, providing support for research and the 
preparation of publications. Every faculty member has the responsibility to advocate 
to students, colleagues, and the public the importance of intellectual curiosity and 
accomplishment. All full-time faculty members should be doctorally qualified or hold 
the relevant terminal degree in their fields. Faculty members are also encouraged to 
engage in activities that serve the needs of the community. 

The College employs as adjunct (part-time) faculty members persons who possess the 
master's degree or equivalent academic credentials and who demonstrate the teaching 
skills required for full-time faculty members. The College provides opportunities for 
adjunct instructors to develop further as teachers and encourages their participation in 
appropriate departmental activities and the campus community. 



10 Introduction 



Admissions 

The College Admissions Office admits an entering class of full-time bachelor's 
degree students with a combined average SAT score of approximately 1100, drawn 
principally from the upper two-fifths of the relevant secondary school graduation 
classes. The Admissions Office seeks especially students who have demonstrated 
ongoing participation and leadership in projects and organizations within the school 
and community. The Admissions Office is, however, sensitive to the adverse effect that 
cultural and socio-economic disadvantages have had on some applicants. It conducts 
special outreach programs and application follow-up steps for such applicants and 
places appropriately greater weight on demonstrated eagerness for self-improvement, 
school/community activities, and letters of recommendation. 

Associate, master's degree, and adult learner programs admit students who are 
prepared to benefit from the curricular program in which they seek to enroll. 

Campus Life and Diversity 

The College strives to foster a campus climate that sets a positive tone for learning 
and for healthy interaction, formally and informally, among College community 
members. In all aspects of academic and student life. College personnel strive to 
create an environment in which all persons interact harmoniously, demonstrating 
respect for the rights of others and commitment to academic freedom and freedom 
of conscience. 

The College assists students who commit full-time to higher education to develop 
intellectually, physically, socially, spiritually, cuhurally, and professionally and, to 
that end, provides a comprehensive program of extracurricular activities. Part-time 
learners are provided with appropriate enrichment opportunities. 

The academic affairs and student affairs components of the College collaborate to 
foster student participation in activities that support appreciation of diversity, growth 
in cultural understanding, improvement of skills for constructive human interaction, 
and commitment to personal fitness. 

Structure and Governance 

The Board of Trustees acts on broad policy matters and has final authority to define the 
College's mission and educational role. The president serves as chief executive officer 
and is responsible to the Board for the operation of the College. Line authority passes 
from the president to the administration and faculty. The College believes in involving 
trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, and students, both formally and informally, in 
shared governance processes. 

A concerted effort is made to maintain an efficient administrative structure 
that facilitates responsiveness to the needs of the College and the people it serves. 
Cooperation among departments and the sharing of resources are emphasized in 
order to minimize bureaucratic barriers and duplication of effort. All employees 
are encouraged to work as a team to create a friendly, service-oriented ambiance on 
campus. 



Institutional Profile, Mission, and Goals 11 



Facilities 

The College prides itself on the attractiveness of its physical environment, providing 
well-maintained, accessible buildings as well as facilities needed for athletics and 
fitness. The goal is to have facilities that are proportionate to enrollment and adequately 
support the requirements of educational and co-curricular programs. 

Financial Goals 

The College is managed to ensure sufficient funds to operate as a comprehensive 
regional college and adequate quasi-endowment and plant fund reserves to provide 
financial aid to students and meet capital needs for facilities renewal and expansion. 
The College observes prudent budgeting, with a sensitivity to students' and families' 
ability to afford private higher education of high quality. 

Alumni 

The College strives to cultivate strong, mutually beneficial, and lifelong relationships 
with its alumni. The College sponsors alumni programming and seeks from its alumni 
guidance, involvement, and financial support. 

Community Relations 

The College endeavors to foster positive interaction with the surrounding community, 
while addressing York County's higher education needs. The College provides physical 
facilities , educational and training programs , consulting services . as well as cultural and 
social activities to the community. Volunteer community service by faculty members, 
students, administrators, and staff is promoted throughout the campus. 

The College participates actively in neighborhood improvement organizations and 
initiatives that are focused on areas contiguous to the campus. 



12 Introduction 



LOCATION 



York College of Pennsylvania's address is in its name — York, Pennsylvania, a city of 
40,000 situated in the heart of the Middle Atlantic population corridor. The campus 
is located on Country Club Road, two miles south of the city center's Continental 
Square. The greater York area includes a total of more than 400,000 people. 

York's most exciting moment in history came during the American Revolution, 
when the British advance on Philadelphia caused the Continental Congress to relocate 
to York, making the town the capital of the nascent nation. During the winter of 1777- 
78, Congress convened in the York County Courthouse and adopted, among other 
important documents, the country's first constitution, the Articles of Confederation, 
in which the official name, the United States of America, was used for the first time. 
Congress also proclaimed the nation's first Thanksgiving holiday while in York, as a 
day of gratitude for the American victory at Saratoga. 

Today, York is an economically diverse and dynamic area, with some of the country's 
most fertile farmland as well as world-class enterprises, including manufacturing and 
headquarters facilities for several major companies, including Adhesives Research, 
Voith Hydro, Glatfelter, Johnson Controls, Harley-Davidson, Graham Packaging, and 
Dentsply International. 




Institutional Profile, Mission, and Goals 13 



FACILITIES 



The campus is bordered by residential neighborhoods, a small shopping plaza. York 
Hospital, and a park. The campus complex includes: 

Schmidt Library: In Schmidt Library, technology meets tradition. Information 
literacy, print and online collections, research, and instructional media are important 
daily priorities. Facilities and services include dynamic group study spaces, quiet 
study areas, laptop loans for use in the Library, comfortable lounge areas, wireless 
York College network access throughout the building and in the outdoor courtyard, 
York College archives, and special collections. The Schmidt Library Web provides 
important access for the College community on and off campus to books, periodicals, 
reference resources, subject specific research pages in the Library, and scores of other 
academic and research libraries. 

Melvin H. Campbell Hall: The facility contains lecture halls, science laboratories, 
a language laboratory, and general purpose classrooms. In 1999, a major renovation 
and expansion of chemistry laboratories created Campbell Hall's Chemistry Wing. 
In 1995, the other classrooms, offices, and facilities in the building were completely 
renovated. 

Appell Life-Sciences Building: Home of the Biological Sciences Department, the 
Life-Sciences Building contains ten laboratories, general purpose classrooms, faculty 
offices, and conference rooms. 

Business Administration Center: Headquarters for the Department of Business 
Administration, the Center contains the main academic computer, microcomputer 
laboratories, classrooms, faculty offices, and the Glatfelter Telecommunications 
Center. 

Information Technology: Information Technology provides state-of-the-art information 
systems to faculty, students, and staff. All members of the York College community 
are assigned a network account that allows them to access file storage, networked 
programs, email, the World Wide Web and printing. York College of Pennsylvania 
network services are provided by a variety of servers to desktop/laptop computers 
via campus- wide fiber optic network connecting all academic, administrative, and 
residential buildings. Currently, York College provides nine public computer labs 
with over 650 up-to-date desktop computers running Windows in addition to many 
academic special-purpose labs throughout the campus. The College has over 59 
smart classrooms that use projection systems, multimedia equipment, and the Internet 
for complementing the learning process. New wireless technologies extend college 
resources beyond the classrooms and labs. There are numerous hot spots for wireless 
connectivity all around campus and a growing number in the residence facilities. The 
Information Technology Help Desk is available to answer technology-related questions 
and provide assistance to faculty, staff, and students. 

McKay Hall: Acquired in 1996 and expanded in 1999, this 39,000-square-foot building 
provides specialized facilities for Nursing and Sport Management. Located one block 



14 Introduction 



west of campus, McKay Hall includes faculty offices, general classroom space, a 
campus computer lab, and specialized laboratories for upper-division nursing classes. 

Evelyn and Earle Wolf Hall: Wolf Hall includes the latest technology for art, 
music, and television. All instructional rooms are wired for television and computer 
applications. Its 60,000 square feet include music practice rooms; music and art 
studios for instruction; television control room, studios and edit suites; an advanced 
applications video, music and art computer facility; a 208-seat recital hall; the York 
College Art Galleries; and general-purpose classrooms. 

Kinsley Engineering Center: York's newest academic building is located on Grantley 
Road and houses teaching, laboratory, and workshop facilities for all engineering 
programs and computer science. 

Grumbacher Sport and Fitness Center: This 1 65 ,000-square-foot building includes a 
large field house as well as the Charles Wolf Gymnasium. It features a state-of-the-art 
fitness center, climbing wall, exercise rooms, natatorium, wrestling room, and other 
recreation facilities . 

The Humanities Center: The Humanities Center is a newly remodeled building 
in the center of campus. It houses the Department of English and Humanities, the 
Department of History and Political Science, as well as general-purpose classrooms, 
computer labs, and a cafe. 

The Collegiate Performing Arts Center: Completed in 2008, the theater seats 720 and 
is well-suited for dramatic productions, concerts, and lectures. A "blackbox" theater is 
also included for specialty presentations. 

The Learning Resource Center: The Learning Resource Center is located in the lower 
level of the Humanities Center and offers tutorial assistance to students in writing and 
mathematics. In addition, the Center coordinates supplemental instruction in certain 
disciplines as requested by classroom instructors, and offers a full range of study 
skills assistance for students. Students seeking assistance should contact the Center to 
schedule an appointment with a member of the professional tutorial staff. Academic 
tutoring in other courses is also available, and students may contact the Center for a list 
of quaUfied upperclassmen willing to work with students for a fee. 

Bookstore: The bookstore, located in the losue Student Union building, offers an 
excellent variety of products that support academic work. In addition to being the 
source for all textbooks, providing both new and used books, the store provides a buy 
back system each semester to recycle unwanted books. The College logo is prominent 
throughout the store on clothing, glassware, and academic supplies. The bookstore 
offers a variety of personal care items and services. 

Robert V. losue Student Union: This facility contains the Johnson Dining Room, 
which seats 600; Buechel Lounge; Alumni Hall; 1770s Room; the Spart's Den, which 
regularly offers live entertainment; lounge areas; a snack bar; college bookstore 
and convenience mini-mart; MacDougal Lounge; conference rooms; offices for 
Counseling Services, Career Development Center, Food Services, Student Senate, 



Institutional Profile, Mission, and Goals 15 



Campus Activities Board. Residence Life. WVYC-FM 99.7 Radio Station. Student 
Activities and Orientation, chaplains, Religious Activities, Multicultural Affairs, and 
the Health Center. 

Ray A. Miller Administration Building: Located along Country Club Road, this 
office building houses the operating support divisions of the College, including the 
President's Office. Admissions, Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, Administrative 
Computer Center, and Business Affairs. 

Brougher Chapel: This campus interfaith chapel serves as the center of worship for all 
faiths in the campus community. It is located on the northeastern comer of the campus 
near the president's home and Springettsbury Avenue. In addition to the main worship 
area, it contains space for religious activities, meditation, counseling, and appropriate 
events. The Catholic and Protestant Chaplain's offices are located in the Chapel as 
well. 






STUDENT LIFE 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 17 

Overview 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY AND THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY 17 

Student Responsibility I Spartan Oath I Housing Requirement I Campus Safety 
(Alcohol and Drug Policy and Program) 

STUDENT AFFAIRS DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES 19 

Athletics and Recreation I Career Development Center I Counseling Services I 
Food Services I Health Services I Judicial Affairs I Multicultural Affairs I 
Religious Activities I Residence Life I Student Activities and Orientation 

CAMPUS LIFE AND INVOLVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 22 

Student Clubs and Organizations I Student Government I Campus Activities 
Board I Campus Recreation and Fitness I Club Sports I Intramural Sports I 
Intercollegiate Sports 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 24 



16 



i 



Student Life 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 



Student life programs and services are driven by the York College mission, and the 
Student Affairs Division has as its primary goal a commitment to providing a campus 
environment that is developmental to student learning and student growth. The focus is 
on generating educational opportunities and wellness both in and outside the classroom 
and through all aspects of student campus life. These programs and services are directed 
and coordinated by the Student Affairs Division through the offices of Athletics and 
Recreation. Career Development Center. Counseling Services. Food Services. Heahh 
Services. Judicial Affairs. Multicultural Affairs. Religious Activities. Residence Life, 
and Student Activities and Orientation. For more detailed information about student 
life, please refer to the student handbook or visit Student Affairs on the York College 
homepage. 



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY AND 
THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY 



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The student at York College is a member of the academic community as well as the 
civil community. All students have the rights, duties, and obligations associated with 
being a citizen in such communities. As legal adults, students are expected to obey 
civil law and accept personal responsibility for their behavior. 

THE SPARTAN OATH 

As A York College Student, I Pledge To: 

• Demonstrate respect for others 

• Exercise all actions with integrity and honesty *^ 

• Communicate and interact in a respectful and considerate manner 

• Evaluate how my actions and decisions affect others and the College community 

• Support and contribute to a healthy living and learning college environment 

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA HOUSING AND 
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

First year through third year full-time students (less than 90 credits) of traditional 
college age including transfers and readmits (who have graduated from high school 
within four years) are required to live in York College residence facilities or to 
commute from the home of a parent/guardian/relative until they have attained senior 

17 



18 Student Life 



status, which is equivalent to 90 credits. Contracts are for the full academic year, 
including for those students that may become part-time in the spring semester. 

Any student interested in living off-campus must apply through the off-campus 
application process. 

CAMPUS SAFETY 

The Department of Campus Safety is the primary department at the College charged 
with creating a safe and secure educational environment. Located in the Manor 
Northeast lobby, the Department operates 24-hours-a-day, seven day s-a- week. Officers 
patrol the campus on foot, bicycles, Segways and in vehicles. Officers respond to 
calls for service and assistance, enforce college policy and investigate all reported 
criminal activity on campus. The Department publishes an annual security report 
that includes all crime statistics for the year and certain security policy statements, 
in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act. The Department of Campus Safety also 
provides a comprehensive crime prevention and education program for the College. 
A 24-hour-a-day escort program for students to all campus locations is available. In 
addition, the Department operates the West Campus Shuttle, which transports students 
between the main and west campus. 

Motor Vehicles 

The Department of Campus Safety at York College of Pennsylvania is responsible for 
enforcing traffic and parking regulations on all College property. These regulations 
were established to provide York College with a safe and organized conmiunity in 
which to live and learn and are in effect at all times throughout the year. In addition to 
College policies, all traffic and parking regulations regulated by the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania apply and are enforced on campus. 

All students are permitted to park motor vehicles on campus or lots adjacent to 
campus and must register their vehicle(s) with the Campus Safety Office. During 
registration, students residing in campus housing must purchase a resident parking 
permit hangtag, which entitles them to park in specific resident parking areas. Students 
residing off campus (commuters) must purchase a commuter parking permit hangtag, 
which allows for parking in designated commuter parking areas. A copy of the College 
traffic and parking regulations and a campus parking map are distributed with each 
permit. 

Alcohol and Drug Policy and Program 

At York College most students are responsible when it comes to making decisions 
about alcohol and/or drug use. You must consider 1) whether to drink or not to drink; 

2) the consequences for choosing to drink or abstaining from drugs and/or alcohol; and 

3) how to be responsible in social situations. Students need to have an awareness about 
the effects of alcohol and drugs, York College regulations, and legal implications. 



Student Life 19 



The Law 

It is illegal in Pennsylvania for persons under the age of 21 to attempt to purchase, 
consume, possess, or transport any alcohol, liquor, malt, or brewed beverages. 
Pennsylvania law prohibits the sale of alcoholic beverages to anyone unless they have 
the proper license issued by the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board. Pennsylvania 
and federal law prohibits the possession, manufacture, sale and distribution of illegal 
substances. Giving marijuana or another drug free of charge may be considered the 
same as sale or distribution. Possession of large amounts of drugs may be viewed as 
possession with intent to sell . Applicable legal sanctions may include loss or suspension 
of driver's license, fines, and/or jail time. 

York College Policy 

Believing that the use of alcoholic beverages is detrimental to the standards of group 
living and academic achievement, the College does not permit students to use, possess, 
or be in the presence of alcoholic beverages on campus, regardless of age; unless 
students of legal age are in the College's designated independent living complex and 
in compliance with related Residence Life policies. 

Consuming alcoholic beverages off campus is not encouraged and, if done, should 
comply with the Pennsylvania State Law. Any student found using or selling illegal 
drugs may face suspension from the College and may also be referred to the civil 
authorities for prosecution. 

Students found in violation of the above policies may be referred to the Residence 
Life Office/Judicial Affairs. DiscipUnary sanctions may include probation, removal 
from residence facilities, and/or suspension from the College. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

York College's sports and recreational program is designed to supplement academic 
experiences by providing opportunities for all students to participate in or witness 
intercollegiate, recreational, or intramural competitions. The program is consciously 
geared to student interests and needs. Care is exercised to avoid detracting from 
students' academic pursuits and to enhance overall achievement, by supplying outlets 
for physical and emotional expression. 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Center assists students with career exploration and development through 
individual appointments, workshops, services, resources, and special events as well as 
a comprehensive website. The Center guides students through the process of selecting 
a major, identifying and securing an internship, preparing resumes, developing 
interviewing skills, and locating full-time employment opportunities. The Center also 



20 Student Life 



coordinates study abroad information and assists students with the graduate school 
application process. 

The Center's four-year program, Plan To Succeed, provides guidance and 
encourages all students to personalize their own academic and career plans during 
their York College experience. It encourages them to Engage, Explore, Experience, 
and Emerge as professionals in their chosen field or discipline. We encourage skill 
development including self-assessment, job search skills, and preparation for life after 
college, which students will use throughout their lives. 

All of the services, resources, and events available through the Center are designed 
to empower students to be active participants in their own career development and life 
planning. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

Counseling Services advances the overall wellness of students through confidential 
individual and group counseling sessions, consultation, crisis intervention, and 
specialized referrals. Staff members are available, upon request, for critical incident 
response and educational programming for the campus community. Offices are located 
in the Student Union, Rooms 120-122. Services can be accessed by contacting the 
office at 717-815-6437 or stopping by during regular businesss hours. Visit our 
comprehensive website at www.ycp.edu/campus/1510.htm. 

FOOD SERVICES 

Compass Group-USA through its Chartwells Division works closely with the Student 
Affairs Division to offer, seven days a week, food that will be both enjoyable and 
economical to students. The management team welcomes constructive suggestions 
from students about the food services. Numerous special dinners are planned during 
the year, and many campus organizations plan their program refreshments through 
food services. Visit: http://www.dineoncampus.com/ycp/. 

All students living in traditional on-campus housing must purchase the College's 
full meal plan. There are several food and beverage outlets on campus to serve the 
varied needs and schedules of our campus community. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

All registered students, full-time and part-time, are eligible to use the Health Center. 
Students are required to have an admission physical and immunizations on file in the 
Health Center. The Health Center is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. See the Health Center web link for hours of operation, immunization/flu clinic 
dates, and physician and nurse practitioner hours. 

JUDICIAL AFFAIRS 

The College discipline process is designed as an educational one, to encourage and 
promote the process of self-discipline. Disciplinary action can be taken against students 
for misconduct/incidents while on or off campus. This includes student misconduct 
that is a violation of College standards, regulations, or the law and that is detrimental 



Student Life 21 



to the College's lawful mission and interests. Full disclosure of the judicial process 
and the College's Student Code of Conduct can be found on the College website or in 
the student handbook. 

MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

The Multicultural Affairs office provides educational and social programs related to 
diversity and multiculturalism for the College campus. These programs enrich the 
overall educational experience and assist with creating an inclusive environment 
leading to a holistic development for students. The Multicultural Affairs office also 
works closely with international students and exchange students, assisting with 
acclimation and transition to York College life, the York community, and American 
society. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Interfaith programs and worship services are planned and coordinated by the Council 
on Religious Activities, the religious organizations, and the chaplains in conjunction 
with the College's Religious Activities Coordinator. The Council and religious staff 
work to foster an atmosphere on campus that will enhance an awareness of the spiritual 
dimensions of life. 

The College retains the services of Catholic and Protestant chaplains for the purpose 
of providing students an additional means of counseling and a source of spiritual 
guidance on campus. The chaplains' offices post day, evening, and weekend hours 
throughout the year. The B rougher Campus Chapel serves as the center of worship for 
all faiths in the College community. 

RESIDENCE LIFE 

Residence Life at York College is an integral part of the college learning experience. The 
Residence Life program seeks to provide a comfortable, safe living environment that 
is conducive to supporting academic success, individual growth, and group interaction 
and development. Residence Life fosters this environment through initiatives and 
activities that promote the ideals of respect, understanding, and community. It is 
the belief of this office that diverse students can learn to appreciate and respect one 
another, as well as themselves, through residence hall living. Living on the York 
College campus is a privilege and, in and of itself, a learning experience. Campus 
housing faciUties include traditional residence halls, suite and apartment-style living. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORIENTATION 

The Office of Student Activities and Orientation exists to facilitate students' transition 
to college and provide a variety of co-curricular experiences during their time at York 
College. The Office creates opportunities for student participation and leadership in 
over 80 clubs, organizations, fraternities, and sororities; volunteerism efforts. Student 
Senate, Campus Activities Board (CAB), Leadership Series and service as Orientation 
Leaders. 



22 Student Life 



CAMPUS LIFE AND INVOLVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

A vital aspect of student life involves participation in campus activities, including 
Student Government, academic, social, and special interest organizations, and the many 
social, educational, and recreational events that take place on campus. A diversified 
' - program of events is planned by students on the Campus Activities Board, working 

with the Office of Student Activities. Each semester features a wide range of activities 
such as comedians, musical performers, weekend events, game shows, concerts, films, 
bus trips, lectures, and many other special events. In addition, academic departments 
i frequently schedule special programs of general appeal. Department offerings have 

ranged from nationally known poets to state officials and leaders from industry and 
community life. 

The Student Union serves as a central meeting spot on campus where many members 
of the campus community can gather to interact socially and intellectually outside 
the classroom. Programs offered at the Student Union provide cultural, social, and 
recreational activities designed to complement academic endeavors . All such programs 
are intended to encourage self-directed activity, giving maximum opportunity for self- 
realization and for growth in individual social competency and group effectiveness. 

STUDENT CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

A well-rounded student is one who gets involved in co-curricular activities, in 
addition to academics. York College offers a wide variety of activities to satisfy every 
interest. Escape and unwind with many of the 80 plus clubs and organizations at the 
College. Among these are sports, musical performing groups, the media and various 
publications, academic and honorary societies, religious and service organizations. 
There are several fraternities and sororities for those who would like to be involved in 
Greek life. For a complete list of all of the opportunities available, check the Student 
Handbook and Activities Calendar. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The Student Senate, as a representative body, provides the means for: 

1 . responsible and effective student participation in the organization and control 
of student affairs; 

2. taking action in the best interest of the student body and college community; 

3. providing an official voice through which student opinion may be expressed; 

4. fostering awareness of the student's position in the campus, local, state, 
national, and international communities. 

Officers and Student Senators are elected by the students. Students are chosen 
by the Student Senate to participate on Faculty Senate committees. Members of the 
Student Senate invite interested students to participate in any Senate function. The 
Senate meets weekly, with three faculty and three administrative advisors. Meetings 
are open to any member of the student body. 



Student Life 23 



CAMPUS ACTIVITIES BOARD 

The Campus Activities Board (CAB) is a standing committee of the Student Senate 
and is comprised of elected Student Senators and appointed Student Association 
members. The committee works closely with the Student Activities Office to bring 
exciting and innovative entertainment to York College students and the community. 
Campus Activities Board applications are available to any interested students in the 
CAB Office. Student Union. CAB is interested in hearing suggestions for activities 
students would like to see on campus. 

CAMPUS RECREATION AND FITNESS 

Campus recreation typically encompasses free play and fitness opportunities for 
students, staff, and faculty. A wide variety of offerings are made available throughout 
the year; activities based largely on the interests of the participants. 

The pool, gym. field house, and fitness center are available at no cost to full-time 
students for recreational play at specified hours. Please check listings for an updated 
schedule of operation. 

CLUB SPORTS 

Many students are interested in competing against other colleges and universities 
without the time demands of a varsity program. For these individuals, the College 
offers a number of club sport programs to choose from. These teams compete against 
other regional two- and four-year institutions throughout the commonly known college 
season. Current offerings include men's and women's rugby, women's lacrosse, men's 
volleyball, women's Softball, equestrian, and coed ultimate frisbee. 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS 

A wide variety of intramurals allows every student to engage in some organized sport 
without the pressure of intercollegiate competition. Men participate in flag football, 
volleyball, basketball, Softball, indoor and outdoor soccer. Women participate in 
volleyball, basketball, softball, and indoor and outdoor soccer. Coed competition is 
held in a variety of sports including volleyball, soccer, and softball. Other activities, 
including a variety of tournaments and contests are added when students express 
interest. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS 

Programs are provided for students who are physically and psychologically equipped 
to participate in competitive sports with representatives from other colleges. 
Intercollegiate sports for men include baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, swimming, 
track and field, wrestling, lacrosse, tennis, and cross country. Women's intercollegiate 
program includes soccer, basketball, field hockey, lacrosse, tennis, track and field, 
cross country, volleyball, softball, and swimming. Cheerleading is a student activity 
closely related to and supportive of the intercollegiate teams. The squad is comprised 
of both men and women. Squad vacancies are filled through open competition. 



24 Student Life 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The graduates of York College become members of the Alumni Association. The 
Alumni Association promotes the interests of the College and its 25,000 alumni by 
organizing programs for alumni and informing them of the progress and needs of their 
alma mater. The Association sponsors reunions, Homecoming, and other events that 
bring alumni back to campus, and supports alumni chapters in locations where large 
numbers of alumni hve. 

The Alunmi Association contributes to student life by underwriting projects that 
improve campus facilities, and sponsoring annual scholarships for more than twenty 
students. The Association also hosts several events for seniors each year, including 
commencement parties and social events that encourage class unity and inform 
students about their opportunities to remain involved with York College. 

The Alumni Association Board of Directors consists of 24 members, and is the 
governing body of the Association. Any alumnus or alumna of York College of 
Pennsylvania, York Junior College, the York Collegiate Institute, and the York County 
Academy is eligible to serve on the Board, which meets five times a year. 



student Life 25 



ADMISSIONS AND FINANCES 



ADMISSIONS POLICY 27 

When and How to Apply I Academic Preparation I Admissions Procedures I 
Acceptance I Admission of International Students I Courses for High School 
Students I Admission of Transfer Students I Admission of Veterans I Premedical 
Scholars! Her shey Medical School Early Admission Program I Matriculation 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 34 

Tuition I Special Fees I Tuition Refund Policy I Deposits I Deferred Payment 
Plan I Satisfactory Academic Progress I Grants I Federal College Work-Study 
Program I Institutional Scholarships I Loans 



26 



Sfc- 




Admissions and Finances 



ADMISSIONS POLICY 



It is the policy of York College of Pennsylvania to grant admission to qualified 
applicants in accordance with the College's non-discrimination policy. An applicant 
who fulfills admission requirements is given every possible consideration given the 
capacity limits of our housing and classroom facilities. 

York College endeavors to admit students whose records indicate that they possess 
the qualities needed to achieve academic success in the academic program they intend 
to pursue. York seeks students who are strongly motivated to excel in college, and who 
are prepared to accept and fulfill collegiate responsibilities. 

Applicants for admission must have graduated from an approved secondary school 
or have earned a state equivalency diploma prior to their enrollment at York College. 
Applicants must present academic records and standardized test scores that the 
College believes demonstrate achievement and ability commensurate with curricular 
expectations. 

York College reserves the right to deny acceptance if it is deemed necessary in the 
interests of public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of 
health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedom of others. 

WHEN AND HOW TO APPLY 

Applicants for admission should submit an application to the Office of Admissions 
early in their senior year. This form must be completed in its entirety and according 
to the printed instructions. The application fee of $30 must accompany the paper 
application. This fee is nonrefundable. No application fee is required for an online 
application. 

ACADEMIC PREPARATION 

In general, the applicant's secondary school program should include a minimum of 
the following units: four in English; three in social studies; three in academic math 
(including Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry); three in laboratory science; and two 
in foreign languages. Admission decisions are based upon a formula that takes into 
account high school performance and SAT (Critical Reading and Math scores only) 
or ACT (optional writing test required) scores, as well as the personal character and 
qualities of the applicant. Minimum acceptable SAT or ACT score standards are 
established at the beginning of every academic year. 

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES 

Students seeking admission to York College directly from secondary school should 
follow these recommended procedures: 

27 



28 Admissions and Finance 



1. Send a completed application to the Admissions Office. 

2. Submit an official transcript of secondary school grades. 

3. Take the Scholastic Assessment Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board or the American College Test (optional writing test required) by January 
of the senior year. Information about the examination may be obtained from 
the high school guidance office. 

4. Applicants whose native language is not English may be required to take 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the SAT II English 
Language Proficiency Test (ELPT). 

5. All applicants are urged to visit the campus. While a personal interview is not 
part of the decision-making process, a meeting with an admissions counselor 
is encouraged and should be scheduled in advance of the visit. 

6. Submit a health history and report of a physical examination prior to 
matriculation. Forms are supplied by the College. 

7. Letters of recommendation are optional. 

8. Home schooling credentials. In addition to the above, home schooling 
applicants must submit the following: 

a. A description for each course taken through home schooling. 

b. Two letters of recommendation, excluding parents or other relatives. 

A high school diploma from a home schooling applicant must be issued by 
one of the following: 

a. School district from which the student is affiliated. 

b. An agency that has been approved by the state's Department of Education 
to issue high school diplomas. 

c. A General Education Diploma (GED). 

A request for the waiver of the high school diploma can be made if the student has 
successfully completed 15-18 non-remedial, academic college credits prior to applying. 
Courses must have been taken in the following areas: English/Communications, 
Mathematics, Laboratory Sciences, Foreign Language, Social Science/History. An 
official college transcript must be submitted to the York College Admissions Office 
directly from the college attended. 

ACCEPTANCE 

Notification 

Committee action occurs and applicants are notified as soon as all credentials have been 
received and evaluated. All acceptances are granted on the condition of satisfactory 
completion of secondary school and appropriate notice to the College of such 
completion. Acceptance into music, music education, music industry and recording 
technology, fine art, and graphic design are conditional pending the successful 
completion of a music audition or portfolio review. 



Admissions and Finance 29 



Deferred Acceptance 

An accepted applicant may defer the acceptance for one academic year pending good 
academic standing at any previous colleges attended. 

Acceptance Deposit 

Applicants for both the fall and spring semesters are encouraged to pay the registration 
deposit as soon as possible. Because admission to York College for the fall semester 
is on a rolling basis and both resident and commuter openings for fall fill quickly, we 
recommend that your deposit be received by May 1 . Deposits received after May 1 
will be accepted contingent upon space availability. Deposits for the fall semester are 
refundable only if written notification to the Admissions Office is postmarked by May 
1. Refund requests by fax or email are not acceptable. Deposits received after May 1 
are not refundable. Deposits for the spring semester are not refundable. 

Housing 

There are three general housing classifications for York College students: 

1 . The Resident Student lives in any of the College-owned or affiliated facilities. 
A Housing Application/Contract and detailed housing information are 
forwarded with each acceptance letter. Housing is reserved as the Application/ 
Contract card and appropriate deposit are received. 

2. The Commuter is a local resident of the York County area who continues to 
live at home while attending the College. 

3 . The Resident Commuter is a student who lives away from home in independent 
(non-College-affiliated) housing. Students living off campus must register 
with the Residence Life Office. 

Early Admission Plan 

In an effort to provide an opportunity for exceptionally well-qualified high school 
students to accelerate their studies, York College offers a program through which 
carefully selected students may be admitted to the College upon completion of the 
junior year of high school. Students enrolled in this program are admitted as freshmen 
and, upon successful completion of the freshman year, are granted a high school 
diploma by their high school, as well as the college credits earned. 

Applicants must have the approval of their parents, the high school principal, and 
be recommended by their guidance counselor, in addition to having a combined SAT 
I score of 1150 (Critical Reading and Math sections only) and a 3.00 cumulative high 
school GPA. A personal interview is required to assess the applicant's level of maturity. 

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

York College welcomes applications from international students . In addition to fulfilling 
the requirements stated under admissions procedures, international students must 
submit satisfactory scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (applicants 
whose native language is English are exempt). A statement must be submitted that is 



30 Admissions and Finance 



certified by a U.S. Embassy or bank that sufficient funds exist and will be released 
from the country to cover all educational and living expenses while attending York 
College. This information is required prior to issuance of an 1-20 AB Form by the 
designated school official. International students must apply for admission and have 
all credentials forwarded by May 1 for the fall semester and by September 1 for the 
spring semester. 

COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

Capable high school juniors and seniors are encouraged to take some college (credit) 
courses during their last two years in high school. The experience exposes them to a 
college environment, while they retain important high school social interactions. To be 
eligible to take such courses , high school students must obtain a letter of recommendation 
from their guidance counselor, have earned a 3.0 GPA, and have achieved a minimum 
of 1150 (Critical Reading and Math sections only) on the combined SAT. Interested 
students should contact the Office of Enrollment Management. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Transfer students from regionally accredited two- and four-year institutions are 
welcomed, however, York College does not currently accept transfer students into the 
Nursing program unless the applicant is a Registered Nurse or a Licensed Practical 
Nurse. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required. Some majors may require 
a higher GPA. A maximum of 75 semester hours will be accepted in transfer from 
two-year colleges, and students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at York 
College to be eligible to earn a degree. 

In addition to completing the York College Application for Admission, students 
who are transferring from other institutions offering college-level work must: 

1. Furnish an official transcript of college work previously taken. An official 
transcript of all previous work is required whether a student has earned 
transfer credit or not, or whether a student wants transfer credit or not. Credit 
may be given for most transfer courses in which the applicant has earned a 
"C" or higher. 

2. A student in academic difficulty at another institution who desires admission 
to York College as a full-time student is not eligible to apply until they have 
taken at least nine to 12 credits of coursework at York College or any other 
accredited institution, and have earned at least a 2.0 ("C") in each course 
taken. 

3. A candidate for a second degree or a second major from York College must 
complete the requirements for the major plus any additional support courses 
the department might require. All general education courses are waived. 

4. Graduation with honors will be based on the cumulative GPA earned including 
transfer credits. 

5. Transfer students are eligible for financial aid at the time of admission. 



Admissions and Finance 31 



York College Transfer Credit Policy 

Transfer Policies 

Students who have completed courses at other regionally accredited colleges are 
welcome to apply to receive transfer credit at York College. In accordance with 
AACRAO (American Association of Collegiate Registrar and Admissions Officers) 
guidelines, transfer credits will be awarded to provide advanced standing to transfer 
students for courses in which a 2.0 ("C") or higher grade is earned, and which are 
comparable and appropriate to the academic programs and general education 
requirements of York College. Colleges may vary in the number of transfer courses 
that are applied to satisfy degree requirements. 

Transfer students must have a minimum of a 2.0 GPA. The Nursing and Elementary 
Education majors require a higher grade point average. A maximum of 75 credits 
will be accepted in transfer from two-year colleges. Transfer students admitted to 
the College with an associate's degree from another institution must satisfy all York 
College general education requirements not completed as transfer credit. Students must 
complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in residence at York College to be eligible for 
a degree . 

York College awards credit but no quality points for transfer work. Transfer grades 
are not computed into the cumulative grade point average except in the calculation of 
graduation honors. 

Transfer credit will be awarded for courses where the student has earned at least a 
2.0 ("C") or higher grade. Grades of "D," "F," "W," "Inc," "Au," or "In Progress" will 
not transfer. Continuing education units (CEUs) will not transfer. 

Technical courses will not transfer to York College. Examples include agriculture, 
electronics . drafting , dental hygiene . hotel management , paralegal , EMT, etc . Remedial 
courses do not transfer. Typically they are numbered from 000 to 099 and include 
English, math, reading, and study skills courses. 

Freshmen orientation or freshmen seminar courses from other institutions will not 
transfer to York College. 

Students transferring with a bachelor's degree from another institution will 
not receive a course-by-course evaluation. Students should contact the academic 
department of their major for determination of courses needed to complete their degree 
at York College. 

If the Advanced Placement and/or Collegiate Level Examination Program (CLEP) 
credits are listed on another colleges' transcript for credit, we require an official copy 
of the score reports for York College to evaluate. 

The World Education Services must evaluate credentials from foreign universities. 
Forms are available in the Admissions Office. 

Classes transferring as electives (IXX, 2XX, 3XX, 4XX) may transfer as specific 
courses. Please see the appropriate academic department for further information if you 
believe the class is equivalent to a York College course. 



32 Admissions and Finance 



Credit Validation 



York College carefully evaluates transfer credits from colleges that have not achieved 
regional accreditation status. In cases where a college has applied for and achieved 
official candidate institution status, credit appropriate to the degree programs of York 
College will be awarded following the successful completion of a full-time (12 credits 
minimum) semester at York College. For students applying to York College with 
credits from non-regionally accredited and non-candidate institutions, the College will 
offer credit for those appropriate experiences that can be validated by York College 
challenge examinations or through standardized external testing, (e.g. CLEP, ACT/ 
PEP, etc.). In view of the College's special mission seeking to address the higher 
education aspirations of members of the York County community, applicants from 
non-regionally accredited institutions in York County may apply for special credit 
validation testing or portfolio review. Special arrangements and the fees for such 
review will be arranged with the cooperation of the sending institution. 

Upon admission to York College, applicants from non-regionally accredited and 
non-candidate institutions may request a review of their transcript for credit validation 
purposes. The advising staff will evaluate the nature of the credits earned at the sending 
institution and make recommendations regarding the appropriate credit validation 
procedures for each student. 

Standardized external testing using the Collegiate Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) will be used whenever possible to validate credit. The Registrar's Office or 
the Evening Resource Center will provide the student with information regarding 
CLEP registration, fees, and test schedules. Internal credit evaluation will be arranged 
through the York College Credit by Examination Program (CBE) for those courses 
or educational experiences that cannot be validated through CLEP examinations. The 
application materials for these examinations are available in each department office, 
and qualified students who wish to validate their credits in this way will be referred to 
the appropriate department chairperson. Fees for York College credit by examinations 
will be waived for applicants from non-accredited institutions in York County who use 
these exams to validate previous educational experiences. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

Any veteran seeking matriculation to York College of Pennsylvania should submit an 
application to the Admissions Office. Those veterans who are eligible for educational 
assistance under any of the current GI Bills, as administered by the Department of 
Veterans Affairs, MUST notify the Director of Records to initiate their educational 
benefits and to ensure that all necessary forms and certificates have been submitted. 
Re-certification will be required for each subsequent enrollment period. Veterans who 
may qualify for advanced standing credit should submit all previous college transcripts 
and training records to the Admissions Office for evaluation. A veteran who is eligible 
for educational assistance benefits may enroll as a non-matriculated student for a 
maximum of two enrollment periods and still utilize those benefits. Any questions or 
concerns relative to Veterans Educational Benefits should be directed to the Office of 
the Director of Records. 



Admissions and Finance 33 



PREMEDICAL SCHOLARS/HERSHEY MEDICAL SCHOOL 
EARLY ADMISSION PROGRAM 

Premedical Scholars participate in a series of pre-professional development 
experiences including Family Practice Grand Rounds at York Hospital made possible 
by the close coordination of York College and York Hospital teaching and research 
programs. Participants in the Premedical Scholars Program are assured admission to 
the Pennsylvania State College of Medicine at Hershey upon graduation from York 
College, contingent upon their academic performance at York College, satisfactory 
interviews, and a competitive Medical College Admission Test (MC AT) score . Eligible 
candidates must achieve a combined SAT score of 1965 or higher, an outstanding 
secondary school record including strong letters of recommendation, and selection by 
the York College Premedical Scholars Admissions Committee. 

York College of Pennsylvania, York Hospital, and the Pennsylvania State University 
College of Medicine at the Hershey Medical Center cooperatively offer this special early 
admissions program for exceptionally accomplished high school seniors who maintain 
high scholarly achievement in college and show a continuing commitment to medicine. 
Participants must maintain a 3.6 or higher grade point average in science (Biology, 
Chemistry, and Physics) and mathematics classes with an overall minimum GPA of 
3.5 while at York College. Premedical Scholars are interviewed by The Committee for 
the Health Professionals of York College and, if qualified, are referred to Pennsylvania 
State University College of Medicine at Hershey for further interviews following the 
sophomore year. Premedical Scholars recommended for early admission interviews 
at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at the Hershey Medical 
Center are eligible for the Pennsylvania State College of Medicine Early Assurance 
of Admission Program. Preference may be given to Pennsylvania residents, due to the 
funding structure of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. 

MATRICULATION 

A student is matriculated when the student 1) applies to the College, 2) is admitted as 
a student into a degree program, and 3) enrolls in one or more courses. 

As a student works toward completing his or her degree requirements, he or she is 
permitted to miss one semester of attendance without losing matriculation status. If a 
student misses a second consecutive semester, he or she loses matriculation status and 
must then obtain and file a readmission application with the Admissions Office and be 
formally readmitted to the College. 

All qualified students must matriculate prior to completing 24 credit hours of course 
work. All students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.0 to be eligible 
for matriculation. Some majors may require a higher grade point average. There are 
many benefits to matriculation, including eligibility to apply for financial aid and the 
assignment of a faculty advisor from the student's curriculum. 

It is important to realize that all students must have matriculated no later than the 
semester prior to the one in which they plan to graduate. Those students who wish to 
matriculate may do so by securing an admissions application from the Admissions 
Office, completing the application, and returning it to that office. 



34 Admissions and Finance 



A student's degree requirements will be determined by the date of declaration of 
the major, whether upon admission or at a later date. A readmitted student's degree 
requirements will be determined by the date of his or her first declaration of a major, 
unless there has been a lapse in attendance of seven or more years. Specifically, 
readmitted students who have not taken courses at York College during the previous 
seven years will complete the degree requirements that are in effect upon readmission; 
all other readmitted students will complete the curriculum as published at the time of 
their first declaration of the major (See Declaring or Changing a Major). 

Provisional Non-Matriculated Student Status: All non-matriculated students 
must maintain a minimum 2.0 grade point average after completing 15 credit hours 
of coursework at York College in order to be eligible for continued enrollment in 
courses. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



TUITION 

Tuition and fees are payable before the beginning of each semester. Payment or 
arrangement for payment must be made before a student may enter class. No reduction 
in tuition or fees is made for late registration. 

Students who do not meet their financial commitments will not be permitted to 
schedule classes for the following semester. Grades and official transcripts will not be 
released until all obligations have been satisfied. 

Following are examples of estimated costs for the 2009-10 semesters. The College 
reserves the right to change fees and charges without notice; however. College policy 
mandates moderate changes with reasonable advance notice of such changes. In 
addition to the cost below, a student will incur expenses for books, supplies, certain 
special fees, and personal needs. 

Typical Tuition and Fees for Full-time Students (12 to 18 credits) 





Resident 


Commuter 




Semester 


Year 


Semester 


Year 


Tuition 


$6,500 


$13,000 


$6,500 


$13,000 


General/Technology Fee 


665 


1,330 


665 


1,330 


Student Senate Fee 


65 


130 


65 


130 


Room (freshman housing) 


2,250 


4,500 


— 


— 


Board (frill meal plan) 


1,790 


3,580 


— 


— 


Total 


$1U70 


$22^40 


$7^30 


$14,460 



Tuition: Over 18 credits is at the per-credit-hour charge of $405. 
GenerallTechnology Fee: Entitles the student to admission to all home athletic 
contests, concerts and lectures, library services, use of the computer labs, Internet 
access, email addresses, the Student Union, scheduling. Health Services, and 
advising services for all students. 



Admissions and Finance 35 

Student Senate Fee: This fee is assessed by the Student Senate and collected by 

the College for the Student Senate. 

Room: Fees for residence halls range from $2,250 to $2,975 depending on the style 

of housing. Both traditional and apartment styles are available . There are a few single 

rooms available for an additional fee depending on location. Students residing in 

traditional dormitories are required to participate in the board arrangements made 

by the College. 

Board: This includes a 225-meal plan. There are also other meal plans offered to 

those students who live in apartment-style housing or who commute. 

Billing Dates (2009-2010) 

Fall Semester: 

Billing Date: June 15.2009 

Payment Due Date: July 6, 2009 

A $35 LATE PAYMENT FEE APPLIES AFTER DUE DATE. 

Typical Tuition and Fees for Part-time Students 
(less than a total of 12 credits per semester) 

Tuition per credit hour $405 

General/Technology Fee (part-time) $320 

SPECIAL FEES 

Application Fee (new students only) $30 

Applied Music 

Private Instruction Music fees in voice, piano, organ, or instrument are 

assessed each semester. Once the student has enrolled and schedules a 

lesson time, the applied music fee will not be refunded for any reason. 

1/2 hour lesson per week $310 

Two 1/2-hour lessons or one 1-hour lesson per week $620 

Audit Fee-per credit hour 1 5% of tuition 

Auditing will not be permitted in laboratory studies, 
studio courses, language courses, or non-credit courses. 

Chemistry Laboratory Breakage Fee Card $ 20 

Students will be responsible for payment for lost or carelessly broken 
equipment. Any unused portion of the card may be refunded at the end 
of the semester provided the instructor endorses the card. 

Chemistry Plant Fee $ 30 

Credit by Examination (per course) $100 



36 Admissions and Finance 



Engineering Majors and Engineering Management Majors 

There will be an additional tuition charge based on the total 
number of credits enrolled. 

0.5 to 5.5 credits $230 

6 to 1 1 .5 credits $470 

1 2 or more credits $635 

Graduation Application Fee (degree fee) $ 60 

December Graduation— September 15 

May Graduation — February 5 

August Graduation— July 15 

Additional Late fee after due date ^, $ 25 

Laboratory Fees (course fee) $ 20 

Fees charged for certain courses (ex. Art, Language, and Science) 
A listing of these courses will be available at the beginning of 
each semester. 

Late Payment Fee for Semester Billing $ 35 

Late Registration (effective first day of semester) 

Full-time students $ 35 

Part-time students $ 20 

Mass Communications Fee (per credit hour) $ 53 
Nursing and Respiratory Therapy Majors 

There will be an additional tuition charge (per credit hour) for courses. $ 95 

Returned Check Charge $ 35 

Student Teaching $230 

Study Abroad Fee (for all students studying abroad) $100 

Course fees associated with certain courses are not listed but may be passed on to 
students enrolled in these classes, (ex., malpractice liability insurance, marine biology, 
field trips, etc.) 

TUITION REFUND POLICY 

WITHDRAWALS prior to the first day of the semester will receive a 100% refund of 
tuition and fees as charged. The deposit is not refundable. 

TOTAL WITHDRAWALS beginning on the first day of the semester will receive a 
pro-rata refund of tuition, fees, room, and board. The daily pro-ration will be calculated 
by dividing the number of days attended (date of withdrawal) by the total number 
of days in the semester, including weekends and breaks unless the period exceeds 
five days. Refunds will be processed until the percentage reaches 60% completion, at 
which time there will be no further refunds. 

DROPPED CLASSES between 12 and 18 credits (full-time status) will not result in 
a refund. A pro-rata refund will be calculated for credits dropped below 12 and over 18. 



Admissions and Finance 37 



Tuition will be refunded using the daily pro-ration for the number of credits dropped. 
Failure to attend class, merely giving notice to instructors, or telephoning, will not 
be considered as an official withdrawal. In the absence of an official withdrawal, the 
student will be responsible for all tuition charges and fees, and will receive a failing 
grade for all scheduled courses. To withdraw from all coursework, a full-time student 
must meet with the Dean of Student Affairs to obtain an official withdrawal form and 
further instructions. To totally withdraw, a part-time student must obtain and complete 
a "Change of Student Record" form through the Records Office or Adult Learner 
Center. 

This refund policy meets the U.S. Department of Education's regulation of a "fair 
and equitable" refund policy. All refund credits to students receiving Title IV federal 
aid will be in compliance with current or amended regulations. 

Return of Federal Title IV Funds Policy 

The Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to recalculate federal financial 
aid eligibility for students who withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of 
absence prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term. The federal Title IV 
financial aid programs must be recalculated in these situations. 

If a student leaves the institution prior to completing 60% of a payment period or 
term, the Financial Aid Office recalculates eligibility for Title IV funds. Recalculation 
is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return of Title IV 
funds formula: 

Percentage of payment period or term completed = the number of days completed 
up to the withdrawal date divided by the total days in the payment period or term. 
(Any break of five days or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This 
percentage is also the percentage of earned aid. 

Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of 
unearned aid using the following formula: 

Aid to be returned = (100% of the aid that could be disbursed minus the percentage 
of earned aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed 
during the payment period or term. 

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the institution would be required to 
return a portion of the funds and the student would be required to return a portion of 
the funds. Keep in mind that when Title IV funds are returned, the student borrower 
may owe a debit balance to the institution. 

If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him/her, the institution would 
owe the student a post-withdrawal disbursement that must be paid within 120 days of 
the student's withdrawal. 

The institution must return the amount of Title IV funds for which it is responsible 
no later than 30 days after the date of the determination of the date of the student's 
withdrawal. 



38 Admissions and Finance 



Title IV funds will be returned in the following order: 

1 . Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

3. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans 

4. Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans 

5. Federal Perkins Loans 

6. Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans 

7. Direct PLUS Loans 

8. Federal Pell Grants 

9. Academic Competitiveness Grant 

10. National SMART Grant 

11. Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grants (SEOG) 

12. TEACH Grant 

13. Any other Title IV program(s) 

DEPOSITS 

New Students 

Applicants for both the fall and spring semesters are encouraged to pay the tuition and 
housing deposit as soon as possible . The deposits are $ 1 00 each . Nursing and Mechanical 
Engineering deposits are higher. Admission to York College for the fall semester is 
on a rolling basis and both resident and commuter openings for fall fill quickly. We 
recommend that your deposit be received by May 1 . Deposits received after May 1 
will be accepted contingent upon space availability. Deposits for the fall semester are 
refundable only if written notification to the Admissions Office is postmarked by May 
L Refund requests by fax or email are not acceptable. Deposits received after May 1 
are not refundable. Deposits for the spring semester are not refundable. 

Returning Students 

Deposits signify a student's intention to return to York College in the succeeding 
semester and are required prior to scheduling classes. There are two types of 
deposits: 

Tuition deposit— $100 each semester 

All students (full- and part-time) are required to pay the tuition deposit prior 
to registering for classes. The deposit is refundable upon written request to the 
Business Office prior to May 1 for summer, prior to July 15 for fall, and prior to 
December 15 for spring. 

Housing/Dorm Damage deposit— $100 per academic year 
Please refer to the residency requirements in the Student Affairs section (pages 
17-21). This deposit is similar to a security deposit. It is held and applied against 
any dorm damages assessed upon departure. Credits will be refunded or applied 
against other balances. This deposit is refundable upon written request to the 
Residence Life Office prior to June 1 for fall and prior to November 1 for spring. 



Admissions and Finance 39 

Both deposits are refundable if a student is academically suspended from the College 
or denied final admission. 

DEFERRED PAYMENT PLAN 

Information regarding the payment plan will be mailed directly to students from 
Higher Education Services. Inc. (HES). The installment payment plan enables parents 
and students to make regularly scheduled installment payments and allows them to 
budget college costs. All or a portion of tuition, room, board and fees are paid in ten 
regularly scheduled payments without interest or carrying charges. The annual cost is 
$45. and must be started before August 1 . 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

Undergraduate students enrolled for 12 credits are considered to be full-time. Six to 
eight credits are considered half-time. Nine to 11 credits are considered to be three- 
quarter time. The following will govern the monitoring of undergraduate students for 
Satisfactory Academic Progress for Title IV financial assistance. 

Good Standing 

1 . To be in good standing, each student must meet the standards for Qualitative 
Progress as measured by cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) and 
Quantitative Progress as measured by cumulative credits earned. 

a. To be in good standing on a QUALITATIVE basis, the following progress 
must be maintained: 

Upon completion of 12 credits 1 .6 GPA 
Upon completion of 24 credits 1 .7 GPA 
Upon completion of 36 credits 1 .85 GPA 
Upon completion of 48 or more credits 2 .0 GPA 

2. To be in good standing on a QUANTITATIVE basis, a student must have 
passed at least 67% of the cumulative number of registered credits at York 
College. 

b. ''Registered credits" are the number of credits for which a student is 
enrolled at the end of the Drop/ Add period. 

3. To determine academic progress, a student's cumulative academic record will 
be reviewed at the end of each semester (fall and spring). (This policy applies 
to both full-time and part-time students.) 

A student who does not satisfy either QUANTITATIVE or QUALITATIVE standards 
will be placed on financial aid probation. The status of a student on financial aid 
probation will be reviewed each semester (fall, spring, summer) to determine if the 
probation may be lifted. 

A student who is placed on financial aid probation may be continued on probation 
for the next two semesters for which the student is enrolled at York College. (Summer 
and fall or fall and spring or spring and summer.) A student on financial aid probation 
who does not return to Good Academic Standing within two semesters (see item 
above) will have all financial aid terminated. 



40 Admissions and Finance 



A student may qualify for reinstatement by enrolling in summer sessions or fall or 
spring semesters (without financial aid) and raising the quantitative and/or qualitative 
record(s) to the required standard. (See "Good Standing" above.) By formal appeal 
through the Office of the Dean of Administrative Services, an extension of one semester 
is granted in exceptional and extenuating circumstances. 

All students must complete their degree program within an established time 
frame. Since enrollment status may vary from semester to semester, the time frame is 
measured in terms of credits attempted at York College. 

Federal Financial Assistance will ternninate 
at the end of the following time frames: 

1 . It is expected that the bachelor's degree will be earned at the point of having 
186 registered credits. Since 67% of the registered credits must be passed 
to maintain satisfactory progress, 124 credits (the number required for 
graduation) would be earned at the point of having 186 registered credits. 

a. Exceptions are: 

1. Mechanical Engineering (141 cr.) 211 credits 

2. Clinical Laboratory Science (129 cr.) 193 credits 

3. Nuclear Medicine (129 cr.) 193 credits 

4. Nursing (132 cr.) 198 credits 
Nursing (LPN) (132 cr.) 198 credits 

5. Secondary Education: 

Biology ( 1 39 cr.) 208 credits 
Enghsh (125 cr.) 187 credits 
General Science (125 cr.) 187 credits 
Mathematics (128 cr.) 192 credits 
Social Studies (133 cr.) 199 credits 

6. Computer Science ( 125 cr.) 187 credits 

7. Elementary Education (131 cr.) 196 credits 

8. Elementary/Special Education (157 cr.) 235 credits 

9. Engineering Management (132 cr.) 198 credits 

10. Graphic Design (129 cr.) 193 credits 

11. General Music Education (134 cr.) 201 credits 

12. Sport Management (129 cr.) 193 credits 

13. Computer Engineering (143 cr.) 214 credits 

14. Electrical Engineering (143 cr.) 214 credits 

15. Forensic Chemistry (127 cr.) 190 credits 

16. Mass Communications (126 cr.) 189 credits 

2. Associate degree candidates should have earned the degree at the point of 
having (62) 93 registered credits. 

Exceptions are: 

1. Biology (66 cr.) 99 credits 

2. Business Administration (67 cr.) 100 credits 

3. Chemistry (68 cr.) 102 credits 



Admissions and Finance 41 



4. Fine Art (68 cr.) 102 credits 

5. Music (63 cr.) 95 credits 

6. Physics (68 cr.) 102 credits 

7. Political Science (67 cr.) 100 credits 

8. Respiratory Therapy (prior Technician Program) (74 cr.) 1 1 1 credits 

9. Respiratory Therapy (99 cr.) 148 credits 

If a student feels he or she has extenuating circumstances, the student should request 
the director of Financial Aid review his or her circumstances. In the event the student 
is not satisfied with the review decision, he or she may appeal in writing to the dean of 
Administrative Services. 

A student on academic suspension is not eligible for any federal, state, or York 
College aid. 

Incomplete courses are counted as courses taken but will not count toward progress 
unless satisfactorily completed within two months of the end of the marking period. 

Withdrawn courses are counted as courses taken but do not count toward progress. 

A repeated course does not count toward progress (it is not a new course). 

Non-credit and audit courses are not counted as courses taken toward progress. 

This policy is subject to change due to modifications in institutional and/or 
governmental regulations. Updated policy statements are available at the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Academic Year 

The York College academic year includes at least 30 weeks of instruction in which 
students are required to earn at least 24 credits to meet progress standards. 

Undergraduate Class Standing 

A student's class is determined by the number of semester hours completed in 
accordance with the following: 

Freshman - to 29.99 credit hours 
Sophomore - 30 to 59.99 credit hours 
Junior - 60 to 89.99 credit hours 
Senior - 90 credit hours and above 

GRANTS 

Federal Pell Grants 

A federal program that provides grants of up to $4,731 to students showing a financial 
need. Application is made directly to the government via the FAFSA (Free Application 
for Federal Student Aid). 



42 Admissions and Finance 



Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant Program 

A federal program that provides grants of up to $750 for the first academic year of 
study and up to $1 ,300 for the second academic year of study. To be eUgible a student 
must: be a U.S. citizen; be a Federal Pell Grant recipient; be enrolled full time; and if 
a second year student, have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. 

National SMART Grant Program 

A Federal program that provides a grant of up to $4,000 for each of the third and fourth 
academic years of study. Eligible students must: be a U.S. citizen; be a Federal Pell 
Grant recipient; be enrolled full-time; major in physical, life, or computer science, 
engineering, mathematics, technology, or a critical foreign language; and have a 
cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. 

Pennsylvania Higher Education Grant Program 

York College of Pennsylvania is a participating institution in the Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Grant Program (PHEAA Grant). All students applying for institutional 
financial aid must apply for these funds if they are Pennsylvania residents. Each year 
application deadlines are announced by the Agency. Students are eligible for up to 
eight semesters of grant eligibility (in a four-year program). Students must maintain 
academic progress (a full-time student must pass a minimum of 24 new credits). 
Students should contact their high school Guidance Office, the Financial Aid Office at 
the school they are, or will be, attending, or PHEAA, Harrisburg, PA 17102 for further 
information. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 

York College of Pennsylvania awards Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants to a limited number of students with exceptional financial need who require 
these grants to attend college. This program was authorized by the Higher Education 
Act of 1965 and began its first year of operation in the fall of 1966. 

The amount of financial assistance students may receive depends on their need. 

FEDERAL COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM 

This program was established by the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 and was 
transferred to the United States Office of Education by the Higher Education Act of 
1965. 

Under the Work-Study Program, full-time students are assigned responsibilities for 
the full academic year. Students may be employed up to 10 hours per week. 

Work-Study has been of particular interest to many students and has become one of 
the most attractive ways to help in the payment of college expenses. If the assignment 
to a Work-Study Program should not sufficiently meet the financial needs of a student 
to attend York College, a "package of aid" (consisting of a combination of work, loan 
or scholarship) may be awarded in order not to place an undue hardship upon the 
student or family. 



Admissions and Finance 43 



INSTITUTIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

York College students benefit from over 210 institutional scholarships, most of which 
come from endowed funds. These scholarships have been established through gifts 
to York College from alumni, private individuals, corporations, organizations, and 
foundations. 

Some fund guidelines stipulate that preference be given to students who major in 
particular disciplines, native of certain regions, dependents of employees of sponsoring 
companies, or qualified recipients in terms of other criteria. Most are available to 
new and returning matriculated full-time students, and are renewed in subsequent 
years, contingent upon satisfactory academic progress. Some are available to part- 
time students. Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 to have a 
scholarship renewed, unless otherwise stipulated. 

In order to be considered for institutional scholarships, a student must first submit 
a properly completed FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) within 
established deadlines. Application forms and details about specific institutional 
scholarships and deadlines are available from the Financial Aid Office. 

Scholarships from which York College students currently benefit 
include: 

Trustee Scholarship 

A competitive scholarship of full tuition per year over four years (eight full-time 
semesters, excluding summers) for ten entering first-time, full-time freshmen who 
graduated in the top one-fifth of their high school class and attained a combined 
critical reading and math SAT score of 1210 or higher or a composite ACT score 
of 29 (optional writing test required). Students must also be U.S. citizens or U.S. 
permanent residents to qualify. An invitation to spring scholarship competition is sent 
to those students who meet eligibility requirements. This scholarship will cover the 
difference between full tuition and government aid or other scholarships. Priority 
given to candidates who submit completed applications, transcripts, and all required 
supporting documentation by January 1 . 

Scholarships will be renewed for up to four years for students who maintain a 
minimum grade point average of 3 .25 . One-half of the scholarship will be awarded 
annually to those maintaining a grade point average of 3.00 to 3.24. Students under 
disciplinary suspension lose future merit scholarship eligibility. 

Valedictorian and Salutatorian Scholarship 

A $26,000 scholarship over four years (eight full-time semesters, excluding summers), 
$6,500 awarded annually for entering first-time, full-time freshmen who were 
valedictorians or salutatorians of their high schools and have a combined critical 
reading and math SAT score of 1150 or higher or a composite ACT score of 26 
(optional writing test required). Students must also be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent 
residents to qualify. 

A minimum grade point average of 3.25 is required to renew the scholarship each 



44 Admissions and Finance 



year for up to four years. One-half of the scholarship will be awarded annually to 
those maintaining a grade point average of 3.00 to 3.24. Students under disciplinary 
suspension lose future merit scholarship eligibility. 

Dean's Academic Scholarship 

An $18,000 scholarship over four years (eight full-time semesters, excluding 
summers), $4,500 awarded annually for entering first-time, full-time freshmen who 
have graduated in the upper two-fifths of their high school class and have a combined 
critical reading and math SAT score of 1 150 or higher or a composite ACT score of 26 
(optional writing test required). Students must also be U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent 
residents to qualify. 

For those graduating from a high school that does not rank students, the Admissions 
Office will determine eligibility based on academic record. A minimum grade point 
average of 3.25 is required to renew the scholarship each year for up to four years. 
One-half of the scholarship will be awarded annually to those maintaining a grade 
point average of 3.00 to 3.24. Students under disciplinary suspension lose future 
merit scholarship eligibility. Priority is given to candidates who submit completed 
applications, transcripts, and all required supporting documentation by January 1 . 

Yorl< County Community Grant 

A $2,000 grant over four consecutive semesters, $500 per semester (excluding 
summers) for full-time new students with no previous post high school college credits 
who are residents of York County. The recipient must be a graduate of a York County 
high school within the past two years. Students may not receive this grant in addition to 
a York College merit scholarship (Trustee, Valedictorian, Salutatorian, Dean's, etc.) 

Recipients must maintain a minimum 2.0 grade point average in order to continue 
eUgibility. 

Transfer Merit Scholarship 

A $2,000 scholarship per year or $1,000 per semester for full-time transfer students 
with an earned GPA of at least 3.25 or membership in Phi Theta Kappa while enrolled 
full-time at the most recently attended regionally accredited Institution. 

A minimum grade point average of 3 .25 is required to renew the scholarship each 
year for up to three years (six full-time semesters, excluding summers). One-half of 
the scholarship will be awarded annually to those maintaining a grade point average of 
3.00 to 3.24. 

LOANS 

York College participates in several loan programs: 

Federal Stafford Loan 
Federal Ford Direct Loan 
Federal Nursing Loan 
Federal Perkins Loan 



Admissions and Finance 45 



Federal Parent Loan (PLUS) 

Federal Graduate PLUS Loan 

A variety of Private or "Alternative" Loans 

Details of these loan programs are available from the Financial Aid Office. 



"^^^r-^^ 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS INFORM ATION 

INTRODUCTION 47 

GETTING STARTED 47 

Academic Advising and Student Responsibility I Course Scheduling/Registration I 
Credit Load I Advance Placement and CLEP I Course Placement I Learning 
Resource Center I Premedical/Pre-Professional Advising I Prelaw Advising I 
Students with Disabilities 

ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS 50 

Communications Standards I Academic Integrity I Attendance Policy I 
Examinations I Grading Policy I Grade Point Average I Incomplete Work I 
PasslEail Option I Auditing a Course I Repeating a Course I 77?^ Grade Report I 
Residency Requirement 

ACADEMIC SUCCESS 55 

Goo(i Academic Standing I Dean 5 Lw? Honors 

ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES 55 

Warning Grades I Unsatisfactory Academic Work I Grade Appeal I Appeals of 
Academic Action I Student Records 

MAKING CHANGES 60 

Drop! Add Procedure I Course Withdrawal I Credit by Examination I Courses 
Taken at Other Institutions I Withdrawal fi-om the College 

WORKING TOWARD A DEGREE 61 

Declaring or Changing a Major I Academic Minors I Declaring a Minor/Double 
Major 

GRADUATION 62 

Awarding of a Second Degree I Awarding of an Additional Major I Graduation 
Honors 

SPECIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES 64 

Independent Study I Internship I Service Learning I Ereshman Honors Program I 
^n/c/v Abroad I y4(iz//r Learner Education I Evening Resource Center I Summer 
Semesters I Office of Community Education 



46 




Academic Affairs Information 



INTRODUCTION 

For students pursuing a program of study at York College, the catalog is the official 
guide to the academic standards, policies, and procedures of the institution. It provides 
essential information and should be used regularly in working with the student's 
academic advisor. 

The information contained in this catalog applies to individuals entering York 
College of Pennsylvania in the academic years for which the general catalog is dated. 
Revisions to the published information may be made during those academic years. 
The material in the Academic Affairs section clarifies the academic standards, policies, 
and procedures in effect at the time of publication. Students are reminded of their 
obligation to comply with these institutional standards. Admission to and attendance 
at the College are conditional upon compliance with these regulations. Additional 
information regarding academic matters is available through the Academic Affairs 
Office, the Advising Office, the Registrar's Office, and the Records Office. 

Students are required to complete the program of study as outlined in the catalog 
in effect at the time of their admission to that program of study. Although this catalog 
was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time of publication, 
the College reserves the right to change any provisions, regulations, or requirements 
set forth within, without notice or obligation. 



GETTING STARTED 



ACADEMIC ADVISING AND STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

Academic Advising is an essential process in the college setting. Upon entering York 
College, every matriculated student is assigned an academic advisor who, through 
experience, professional background and example, is qualified to assist the student 
in planning the coursework of the program of study, in developing strategies for 
academic success, and in providing guidance and information in preparation for the 
student's career and life goals. 

Academic advisors are available to meet with their advisees during their regularly 
scheduled office hours when the College is in session in the fall and spring semesters or 
by appointment at other times. In addition, other academic support services are offered 
through the offices of Academic Affairs, Academic Advising, the Registrar, Records, 
the Evening Resource Center, Career Development Center, Counseling Services, and 
the Learning Resource Center. 

While Academic Advising assists students in their academic planning , it is ultimately 
the student's responsibility to meet the academic requirements for graduation. Each 
student is expected to meet regularly with his or her advisor to discuss the development 



47 



48 Academic Affairs Information 



and implementation of a plan of short- and long-term academic goals. The final 
responsibility in meeting graduation requirements rests with the student. 

COURSE SCHEDULING/REGISTRATION 

A schedule of classes for each semester is provided along with a rotation timetable 
for course registration. Matriculated students register through the online YCP Web for 
enrollment in the official records of the College. 

Newly admitted students for the fall semester are invited to an orientation program 
in late spring. At this time, new students will meet with an academic advisor and 
receive an overview of their chosen major and college procedures. New students who 
attend the orientation will receive a schedule for their first semester by mail within a 
few weeks of the orientation. New students who are not able to attend the orientation 
should contact the Registrar's Office during the summer. 

Students who schedule classes and pay their tuition bills prior to the Business 
Office's payment deadline will be automatically registered for the semester and placed 
on instructors' class rosters. 

All newly matriculated students at York College have an "Advisor Hold" placed on 
their account for their first two semesters of enrollment. This hold prohibits registration 
for classes until it is released by the academic advisor. The hold is released after the 
student meets with their advisor to discuss course work, schedule, and academic 
progress. 

CREDIT LOAD 

While the regular full tuition permits a student to carry up to 18 credit hours each 
semester, most students will carry a 15-credit hour load plus physical education. 
Students with a 3.0 cumulative GPA may register for up to 21 credit hours per semester 
upon payment of the appropriate additional fees. 

Anyone enrolled in more than 18 credits as of the last day to add a class will be 
billed for those additional credits whether or not the student drops below 19 credits at 
a future time during the semester. Withdrawal from a course will have no bearing on 
the student's financial obligation to the College. 

Part-time students may register for a maximum of 1 1 .5 credits per semester. 
Full-time students must register for 12 or more credits per semester. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND CLEP 

Advanced placement and college credit may be granted to entering students who perform 
satisfactorily on the College Board Advanced Placement Examinations, the College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP), American College Testing/PEP examination, or 
other proficiency tests that have been approved by the dean of Academic Affairs and 
the chair of the department. Similarly, a student who has matriculated and based on 
previous experience, training, and background believes that he or she has sufficient 
knowledge to pass a course by examination may, upon petition to the appropriate 
department chair, be given a suitable examination for the course desired. 

The following regulations apply to students who earn credit and/or advanced 
standing: 



Academic Affairs Information 49 



1 . The department chair or the student may initiate procedures resulting in credit 
or advanced standing for a course. 

2. College credit will be granted to entering freshmen who earn scores of 3, 4, 
or 5 on the individual subject tests of the College Board Advanced Placement 
Examinations. 

3. Credit will be granted on CLEP examinations on the basis of the York College 
of Pennsylvania CLEP Equivalency report available at the Registrar's Office 
and the Evening Resource Center. No more than six credits shall be granted for 
any one of the tests. To obtain credit the student must score above 50 in each 
test and meet any other requirements specified on the Equivalency report or 
by the College. Further information can be obtained at the Registrar's Office 
or the Evening Resource Center. 

4. A course for which credit and/or advanced placement has been granted will 
be noted on the permanent record and will represent credit for, or a waiver of, 
a specific course, whichever is appropriate. 

5. The maximum number of credits that any one person may earn by advanced 
placement and/or credit by examination is 60 for the Baccalaureate Degree 
and 30 for the Associate's Degree. CLEP examinations may not be scheduled 
within the final 30-credit residency period. 

6. The department chair and dean of Academic Affairs will determine what is 
a satisfactory score on performance tests used by the College other than the 
College Board Advanced Placement Examinations, College Level Examination 
Program, and the American College Testing/PEP examinations. 

7. A student wishing to receive credit for previous life experiences must present 
a portfolio of experiences in writing to the Academic Dean's Office. The 
portfolio will then be forwarded to the appropriate department(s) for review 
and evaluation. 

COURSE PLACEMENT 

Course placement procedures are utilized in mathematics, foreign language, music, 
and other disciplines to ensure that students have a positive and appropriate learning 
experience. Initial placement in such courses may be based on high school records, 
SAT scores, or college-administered test results. Students who believe that they have 
been incorrectly placed based on these measures should contact the department chair 
to discuss their concerns. 

Students whose proficiency in foreign language, music, etc., qualifies them for 
placement at advanced levels of study may not receive credit for courses below the 
level in which they have been placed. 

THE LEARNING RESOURCE CENTER 

For students encountering academic problems with a particular assignment or project, 
individual and/or small group tutorial assistance beyond the classroom is available in 
the Learning Resource Center, located in the lower level of the Humanities Center. 
The Center is open more than 60 hours a week; specific times are publicized and 
posted at the beginning of each semester, with limited hours in the summer. 



50 Academic Affairs Information 



The Learning Resource Center offers tutorial assistance to students in writing 
and mathematics. In addition, the Center coordinates supplemental instruction in 
certain disciplines as requested by classroom instructors, and offers a full range of 
study skills assistance for students. Students seeking assistance should contact the 
Center to schedule an appointment with a member of the professional tutorial staff. 
Appointments for Learning Resource Center tutoring may also be scheduled online 
through the Center website. Academic tutoring in other courses is also available, and 
students may contact the Center for a list of qualified upperclassmen willing to work 
with students. 

PREMEDICAL/PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADVISING 

For students seeking a career in medicine, dentistry, optometry, or other health 
professions. The Committee for the Health Professions provides information and 
advising relative to program requirements and admissions procedures and standards. 
The Committee can provide assistance to students regarding MCAT and DAT Exams as 
well as school information and application process. Interested students should contact 
the Department of Biological Sciences for referral to a member of the Committee. 

PRELAW ADVISING 

Students seeking admission to law school following graduation and/or information and 
guidance regarding the LSAT or admission procedures to law school may contact the 
Prelaw Advisory Committee for special support and academic assistance. Interested 
students should contact the Career Development Center for referral to a member of 
the Committee. 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 

York College will not discriminate against any qualified student with a disability or 
handicap in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The College will reasonably accommodate 
the needs of students with a handicap or disability provided such accommodation 
does not constitute a fundamental alteration of the school's program of education or 
otherwise constitute an undue burden. York College is dedicated to serving the needs 
of its students regardless of handicap or disability by providing a quality learning 
experience that will prepare graduates for productive roles in society. 

Students requesting support or accommodations should meet with the Disability 
Support Services Coordinator in the Academic Advising Office to provide 
documentation regarding the nature of their disability and to plan an appropriate 
strategy for completing their academic requirements. 



ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS 



COMMUNICATION STANDARDS 

York College recognizes the importance of effective communication in all disciplines 
and careers. Therefore students are expected to competently analyze, synthesize. 



Academic Affairs Information 51 



organize, and articulate course material in papers, examinations, and presentations. 
In addition, students should know and use communication skills cun-ent to their field 
of study, recognize the need for revision as part of their writing process, and employ 
standard conventions of English usage in both writing and speaking. Students may 
be asked to further revise assignments that do not demonstrate effective use of these 
communication skills. 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

York College's mission statement stipulates that strict adherence to principles of 
academic honesty is expected of all students. Therefore, academic dishonesty will not 
be tolerated at York College. Academic dishonesty refers to actions such as, but not 
limited to. cheating, plagiarism, fabricating research, falsifying academic documents, 
etc., and includes all situations where students make use of the work of others and 
claim such work as their own. 

When a faculty member believes a student has committed an act of academic 
dishonesty, the faculty member must inform the student in writing and then has 10 
business days from that written notification to the student to report the incident to 
the Dean of Academic Affairs and the department chair. Documentation related to 
instances of academic dishonesty will be kept on file in the student's permanent 
record. If the academic dishonesty is the student's first offense, the faculty member 
will have the discretion to decide on a suitable sanction up to a grade of "0" for the 
course. Students are not permitted to withdraw from a course in which they have been 
accused of academic dishonesty. 

Students who believe they have been unjustly charged or sanctioned (in cases 
involving a first offense) must discuss the situation with the faculty member and have 
10 business days thereafter to submit an appeal to Student Welfare Committee through 
the Dean of Academic Affairs. If an appeal is filed, the Student Welfare Committee 
will then conduct a hearing to review the charge and/or sanction. In cases of a first 
offense, the faculty member may request that the Student Welfare Committee conduct 
a hearing and decide on the sanction, which can involve academic suspension or 
dismissal from the College, if the faculty member believes the offense to be of an 
extremely egregious nature. 

If the Dean of Academic Affairs determines that the academic dishonesty is the 
student's second offense, the dean will provide written notification to the student, 
the faculty member, and the department chair. The Student Welfare Committee will 
automatically conduct a hearing to review the charge and decide on an appropriate 
sanction, which will involve academic suspension or dismissal from the College. 
Students who believe the Student Welfare Committee has unjustly sanctioned them 
may submit a written appeal to the Dean of Academic Affairs within 72 hours of 
receiving notification of the Student Welfare Committee's sanction. 

ATTENDANCE POLICY 

Students are expected to attend all scheduled class meetings. Class attendance policy, 
and the impact of class absences on the course grade, will be determined by each 
course instructor. The class will be informed in writing within the syllabus whether 



52 Academic Affairs Information 



attendance is used as a criterion in evaluating student performance. The student is 
responsible for all work of the course unless specifically exempted by the instructor. 
It is recognized that some absences may be necessary or unavoidable. The student 
should inform the instructor of the reason for the absence and make up any work 
that is missed. The responsibility for initiating action to make up work missed in the 
classroom rests with the student. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The course instructor determines how students will be evaluated in individual courses 
and informs the students at the beginning of the semester in the course syllabus. 

Final examinations, held during the final examination week, are generally designed 
to cover the materials discussed during the semester's coursework. Final exams are 
generally two hours in length for each course and are administered through a special 
final exam schedule published each semester. If a student has three or more final exams 
scheduled on a given day, he or she should contact one of the course instructors to 
schedule another time during final examination week to take the exam. 

GRADING POLICY 

Grade Description 

4 Superior: This grade denotes accomplishment that is truly distinctive 

and decidedly outstanding. It represents a high degree of attainment 
and is a grade that demands evidence of originality, independent work, 
an open and discriminating mind, and completeness and accuracy of 
knov/ledge, as well as an effective use of the knowledge. 
3.5 Excellent: This grade denotes mastery of the subject matter. It represents 

excellence in many aspects of the work, such as initiative, serious 
and determined industry, the ability to organize work, the ability to 
comprehend and retain subject matter and to apply it to new problems 
and contexts. 

3 Good: This grade denotes considerable understanding of the subject 

matter. It represents a strong grasp and clear understanding of the 
subject matter and the ability to comprehend and retain course content, 
but inconsistently applies it to new problems and contexts. 
2 .5 Above Average: This grade denotes above average understanding of the 

subject matter. It represents a limited ability to comprehend and retain 
course content and apply it to new problems and contexts. 

2 Average: This grade denotes average understanding of the subject 

matter. It represents the grade that may be expected of a student of 
normal ability who gives the work a reasonable amount of time and 
effort. 

1 Below Average: This grade denotes below average understanding of 

the subject matter. It represents work that falls below the acceptable 
standard. 

Failure: This grade denotes inadequate understanding of the subject 

matter. It signifies an absence of meaningful engagement with the subject 



Academic Affairs Information 53 



matter and that the student is not capable of doing or understanding the 
work or has made little or no effort to do so. 

I Incomplete: The student may request permission from the instructor 

to receive an incomplete prior to the final examination and must 
present extraordinary reasons for the petition. Any grades of "F' not 
removed within two calendar months after the end of the semester will 
automatically be changed to "'0"" or "F" in the Records Office. Grades 
of incomplete should only be provided to students who have completed 
a substantial portion of all course requirements, are in good academic 
standing in the course when the incomplete is granted, and if the 
instructor believes the remaining coursework can be completed during 
the defined period. 

W Withdrawal: Students are permitted to withdraw from courses 

without penalty up to the ninth Friday of the fall or spring semester. 
Corresponding deadlines are set for all other semesters (e.g., summer 
sessions). 

P Pass: This grade denotes passing in special Pass/Fail courses. 

F Fail: This grade denotes failure in special Pass/Fail courses. 

AU Audit: This grade indicates that a student is registered for a course but 

receives no credit. 

THE GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

The grade point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the hours of credits in a 
course by the grade earned for all courses completed and dividing the total number of 
points by the total number of credit hours attempted. 

Example: A student carrying 16 credit hours and receiving for his/her first term's 
work the following grades would have a GPA of 2.69. 



Course Credits/Grade 




Quality Points 


1st course 3x2 


= 


6 


2nd course 3 x 3.5 


= 


10.5 


3rd course 3x2 


= 


6 


4th course 3x2.5 


= 


7.5 


5th course 3x3 


= 


9 


Physical Education 1 x 4 


= 


4 


16 credits 




43 Quality Points 


Grade Point Average (GPA) = 43/16 = 2.69 







INCOMPLETE WORK 

A student may request an incomplete grade for a course when illness, family tragedy, 
or similar extenuating circumstances make it impossible for the student to complete 
the remaining requirements of the course by the end of the semester. The student 
should contact the course instructor with this request. At the instructor's discretion. 



54 Academic Affairs Information 



a grade of "I" may be granted if the student has completed a substantial portion of all 
course requirements, is in good academic standing in the course when the incomplete 
is granted, and if the instructor believes the remaining coursework can be completed 
during the defined period. All incomplete work must be completed within 60 days 
from the last day of finals in the semester in which the coursework is taken or the 
student will automatically receive a grade of "0." It is the student's responsibility 
to contact the instructor and make all the arrangements to complete the coursework 
within the given time frame. 

PASS/FAIL OPTION 

York College students may take designated courses on a pass/fail basis. Those courses 
offered with the pass/fail option will be indicated in the Schedule of Classes brochure 
prepared each semester. Students may register for a maximum of two pass/fail courses 
per academic year with a maximum of eight such courses in a student's undergraduate 
program. Students may not take courses required in their major or minor field on 
a pass/fail basis and may not use pass/fail courses to complete General Education 
requirements (that is. Common Core and Area Distribution Requirements) even if 
courses are offered in that manner. In addition, a student registered for a I2-credit 
course load with three credits of pass/fail coursework will not be eligible for Dean's 
List recognition. 

AUDITING A COURSE 

Students or members of the community who wish to audit a course will be accommodated 
after full-time students have registered for courses. Regulations affecting auditors are: 
no attendance record is maintained; no assignments are made or papers corrected; no 
examinations are taken; no course credits are received; and a nominal tuition charge 
will be made (see Tuition and Fees section). Students cannot audit lab courses, studio 
courses, non-credit courses. Independent Study, or internships. 

REPEATING A COURSE 

Any student who has taken a course at York College will be permitted to repeat this 
course. While both grades will appear on the student's permanent record, the quality 
points earned on the basis of the higher grade will be used in the computation of the 
cumulative grade point average. 

Since grades and quality points are not transferred from other institutions, a course 
may only be repeated at York College. 

THE GRADE REPORT 

York College issues final grade reports at the end of each semester (December and 
May) and at the end of each summer semester. These grades are sent to the student's 
designated permanent address on file in the Records Office and are entered on the 
official college transcript in the student's permanent file in the Records Office. Students 
may also access their transcript online through My YCR 



Academic Affairs Information 55 



RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT 

The college residency requirement policy requires that the final 30 credit hours of a 
student's degree requirements be completed as coursevvork at York College. Because 
a student should take most of his or her upper-division courses in the major during 
this time, it is important that these advanced credit hours be completed at the College. 
Therefore, no transfer credits or CLEP examinations are accepted in the final 30- 
credit hours of a student's coursework. Students who are enrolled in the Baccalaureate 
Completion Program for Registered Nurses are exempt from this requirement. 



ACADEMIC SUCCESS 



GOOD ACADEMIC STANDING 

To be in good academic standing and eligible for continued enrollment, a student must 
maintain a minimum of a 2.0 cumulative GPA. Students whose cumulative GPA is less 
than 2.0 are subject to academic probation, academic restriction, academic suspension, 
or dismissal from the College. 

DEAN'S LIST HONORS 

At the end of each semester, the Dean of Academic Affairs will publish a list of students 
for Dean's List Recognition. To be eligible for this honor, a student must be registered 
for at least 12 academic credit hours and earn a semester GPA of 3.50 or higher. Pass/ 
fail courses will not be counted as part of the 12-credit course load required for this 
recognition. 



ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES 



WARNING GRADES 

Between the seventh and eighth week of the semester, a student whose work in any 
course is unsatisfactory may receive a warning notice from the course instructor. 
Unsatisfactory work is defined as that which warrants a grade of less than 2.0. Whether 
the student receives the warning notice or not, the instructor will submit an official 
report of the unsatisfactory work and a notice is sent to the person(s) responsible for 
the student's financial account, typically parents. Any student who is at least 21 years 
of age, married, self-supporting, or a veteran may request that warning grades not be 
sent to parents. Warning grades may be confirmed through the Records Office or the 
Academic Advising Office. Students who receive such warning grades should meet 
with their instructor and academic advisor for guidance in improving their grades. 

UNSATISFACTORY ACADEMIC WORK 

Students' academic work will be considered unsatisfactory whenever their cumulative 
GPA is less than 2.0. The academic performance of all students, full- and part-time. 



56 Academic Affairs Information 



will be reviewed against this standard at the conclusion of each semester to determine 
whether students in academic difficulty should be allowed to continue on a probationary 
or restricted basis, should be suspended for one year, or should be dismissed from the 
College. 

For students whose cumulative GPA is less than 2.0, the following 
academic actions will occur: 

• A student who has attempted at least 1 2 credit hours and whose cumulative GPA 
is less than 1 .60 will be placed on academic probation. 

• A student who has attempted at least 24 credit hours and whose cumulative GPA 
is less than 1.70 will be placed on academic probation, or will be placed on 
academic restriction if previously on academic probation, or will be placed on 
academic suspension if previously on academic restriction. 

• A student who has attempted at least 36 credit hours and whose cumulative GPA 
is less than 1.85 will be placed on academic probation, or will be placed on 
academic restriction if previously on probation, or will be placed on academic 
suspension if previously on academic restriction. 

• A student who has attempted at least 48 credit hours and whose cumulative GPA is 
less than 2.0 will be placed on academic probation, or will be placed on academic 
restriction if previously on probation, or will be placed on academic suspension 
if previously on academic restriction. 

• Any student whose cumulative GPA is less than 1 .20 or whose semester GPA is 
less than 0.50 will be placed on academic restriction immediately. 

Academic Probation 

Students placed on academic probation may continue their enrollment at the College, 
but they will be limited to a maximum of 13 credit hours per semester until their 
cumulative GPA is 2.0 or higher. While working toward attaining the 2.0 cumulative 
GPA, students who fail to meet the academic standards for the credit hours attempted 
as outlined above face restriction or suspension. 

Academic Restriction 

Students placed on academic restriction may continue their enrollment at the College, 
but they will be limited to a maximum of 13 credit hours per semester. Those students 
who take six credit hours or more at York College and earn at least a 2.0 overall in 
those courses will be placed on academic probation (or will be considered to be in 
good academic standing if they raise their cumulative GPA to at least a 2.0). Students 
who fail to earn a 2.0 overall in the courses taken during their semester of restriction or 
who fail to raise their cumulative GPA to meet the GPA standards for the credit hours 
attempted as outlined above will be placed on academic suspension. 

Students placed on academic restriction may take an unlimited number of credit 
hours at another accredited institution. Those students who take at least six credit 
hours at another accredited institution during their semester of restriction and earn at 
least a 2.0 overall in those courses will be placed on academic probation upon their 



Academic Affairs Information 57 



return to York College. Students will lose matriculation if they are away from York 
College for more than one semester, thus requiring them to apply for readmission. 

Academic Suspension 

Students placed on academic suspension are prohibited from enrolling in any course 
at York College for at least one year. In order to resume enrollment at York College, 
academically suspended students must apply for readmission to the College (official 
readmission forms are available from the Admissions Office). Those students who 
take at least six credit hours at another accredited institution and earn at least a 2.0 
overall in those courses will be eligible to apply for readmission. Upon readmission, 
these students will be placed on academic probation. Students who fail to raise their 
cumulative GPA to meet the GPA standards for the credit hours attempted as outlined 
above will be dismissed from the College. 

Academic Dismissal 

Students dismissed from the College are eligible to transfer their credits to another 
college or university to complete a degree, but they are no longer permitted to enroll 
in courses at York College. 

GRADE APPEAL 

A student contemplating filing a grade appeal understands that consistent with the 
practice of academic freedom, professors bear responsibility for assigning course grades 
in accordance with professionally acceptable standards that have been communicated 
to students verbally or in writing. Students who believe that their final grade in a 
course does not accurately reflect their performance should appeal their grade directly 
to the course instructor. A student can appeal a grade until the end of the following 
semester. Following discussion with the instructor, the student may request a review of 
his or her grade by the department chair if the student believes his or her concern has 
not been adequately addressed. 

APPEALS OF ACADEMIC ACTION 

The Student Welfare Committee of the Academic Senate is responsible for making 
recommendations regarding matters of an academic nature, including criteria for 
admission, probation and suspension of students, and a review of cases that cannot 
be properly handled by fixed rules. The Committee may also make recommendations 
concerning disciplinary action when academic matters are involved, if requested to do 
so by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

The Student Welfare Committee will review probation, restriction, and suspension 
appeals following the fall and spring semesters. Students must submit their appeal to 
the Committee in writing following the schedule described in the notice of probation, 
restriction, or suspension. Students submitting written appeals may also schedule an 
appointment to appear at their hearing and present their petition to the Student Welfare 
Committee in person. 



58 Academic Affairs Information 



The Student Welfare Committee will also consider written student petitions 
regarding other academic matters at their regular meetings during the academic year. 
Students should address their petitions to: Chair, Student Welfare Committee; c/o 
Office of Academic Affairs. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

The College maintains the confidential academic records of each student in a centralized 
location in the Records Office. Academic advisors, counselors, administrators, and 
department chairs use the Records Office when assisting the students. 

Students should consult the Records Office on matters relating to their academic 
progress and when requesting transcripts. Official transcripts are sent by request when 
the student has met all financial obligations at York College and has presented written 
consent to the Records Office. There is a $5 processing fee per official transcript. 
Matriculated students can print an unofficial transcript through YCP Web. 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain 
rights with respect to their educational records. They are: 

The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of 

the day the College receives a request for access. 

Students should submit to the Director of Records written requests that 
identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Director of Records will make 
arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where 
the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College 
official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student 
of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 

The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the 

student believes are inaccurate or misleading. 

Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate 
or misleading. They should write the College official responsible for the record, 
clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is 
inaccurate or misleading. 

If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, 
the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of 
his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional 
information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student 
when notified of the right to a hearing. 

The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained 
in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes 
disclosure without consent. 

One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school 
officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person 
employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, 



Academic Affairs Information 59 



or support staff position (including security personnel and health staff); a person 
or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, 
or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student 
serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, 
or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. 

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review 
an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. 

Parental Notification on Student Records and College Matters 

Parental rights of access to educational records depend on the student's financial 
status, either dependent or independent. If the adult student is financially 
independent, parents have no right of access without the student's consent. If, 
however, the student is a financial dependent, a parent/guardian's request for 
educational records is honored by York College. It is the student's responsibility to 
clarify and document his/her financial status and acknowledge acceptance of the 
College's disclosure policy upon admission and to update such information via the 
Records Office. 

Parents or legal guardians of financially dependent students will be notified by the 
Academic Affairs Office/College officials when their son or daughter has been 
issued warning grades at mid-term. Professors are not required to issue warning 
grades to students, and some do not. A copy of the final grades will be sent to the 
designated parent(s)/guardian(s) in addition to the report sent to the student. 

Parents or legal guardians of financially dependent students will be notified by 
the Student Affairs Offices/College officials when their son or daughter has been 
responsible for a violation of the College's student code of conduct. Students 
and parents are encouraged to discuss these disciplinary matters to assist in the 
attainment of behavioral improvement. 

Directory information is distributed without prior consent of the student. Directory 
information is defined as a student's name, address, email address, telephone 
number, date of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, class year and 
degree, and awards received. However, students who do not wish such information 
to be released or made public may inform the Admissions Office, if a new student, 
or the Records Office, if a returning student, in writing by September 1 for the fall 
semester or January 15 for the spring semester. 

Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education 
concerning alleged failures by York College of Pennsylvania to comply with the 
requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers 
FERPA is: 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605 



60 Academic Affairs Information 



MAKING CHANGES 



DROP/ADD PROCEDURE 

A student may drop and/or add a course online anytime during the first week of classes 
each fall and spring semester. Checking with the academic advisor about a course 
schedule change is advisable, as is checking course availability through the Registrar's 
Office or the online schedule of classes. The procedure for dropping or adding a class 
in person involves completion of a Request for Change in Student Record form and 
submission of this form to the Registrar's Office or the Evening Resource Center. 
A course dropped during the first week of class will not show on the permanent 
transcript. No extensions are granted beyond the Drop/ Add deadline. See below for 
Course Withdrawal. 

COURSE WITHDRAWAL 

The last day to withdraw from a course during the fall and spring semesters is the ninth 
Friday of the academic semester in order to avoid a grade penalty. To withdraw from 
a course, the student must complete a Request for Change in Student Record form 
in the Records Office. Students may not withdraw from a course on the YCP Web. 
Failure to attend class or merely giving notice to the course instructor is not considered 
an official withdrawal. No extensions are granted beyond the withdrawal deadline. 
Course withdrawal will appear on the permanent transcript as "W." See Drop/ Add 
above. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Matriculated students may earn course credit by successfully completing an examination 
that tests mastery of the learning outcomes of a given course. Credit is awarded for 
successful completion of the examination. 

1 . Examinations may be permitted at the discretion of the academic department 
chair. 

2. Application for examination should be made in writing to the appropriate 
department chair on forms available in the Registrar's Office or Academic 
Advising Office. 

3. If the department chair approves the application, the chair will designate 
the appropriate instructor who will prepare, administer, and evaluate the 
examination that is normally not less than three hours in length. 

4. A student should not use credit by examination to complete any course 
required for graduation during the last semester. 

5. Credit earned in a course taken by examination, 2 level ("C") work or better, 
shall be recorded together with quality points on the permanent record. 

6. The maximum number of credits eligible to be earned by credit by examination 
is 30. 



Academic Affairs Information 61 



COURSES TAKEN AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

Students desiring to pursue summer coursework or additional work at another 
accredited institution must secure written approval from their academic advisor and 
the Registrar's Office prior to beginning the work in order for the credits to transfer 
into York College. Off Campus Study Approval forms to obtain such permission are 
available in the Registrar's Office, the Advising Office, and the Evening Resource 
Center. 

In order to receive transfer credit from courses at other accredited institutions, a 
student must receive a grade of "C" (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better. Credit hours for these 
courses may be transferred, but grades and quality points will not transfer; however, 
transfer credits will be included in the calculation of graduation honors. Students are 
reminded that they must complete the last 30 credit hours of their program of study as 
coursework at York College. In general, if a student wishes to take courses at another 
institution, it is wise to register for lower-division courses since most majors require 
students to take their upper-division courses in their major as coursework at York 
College. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE 

When circumstances indicate that a full-time student must withdraw from the College, 
he or she must contact the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs for a complete 
withdrawal from all courses. A student who officially withdraws from the College 
receives grades of "Ws" on the transcript. A student who ceases attending classes 
without completing his or her formal withdrawal will receive a grade of "0" in all 
registered courses. In addition, the student remains responsible for all financial 
obligations. A student who withdraws before the end of the term or is suspended or 
expelled receives no refund. In some academic programs, withdrawal might affect a 
student's status as maintaining regular progression toward the major. 

Part-time students should contact the Registrar's Office if withdrawing completely 
from the College. Part-time students should note that withdrawal during or after the 
first class meeting will not eliminate the obligation to pay any remaining balance. See 
Tuition and Fees section for refund policy. 



WORKING TOWARD A DEGREE 



DECLARING OR CHANGING A MAJOR 

Students typically declare a major program of study upon admission to York College. 
However, some students who have not decided on a specific major register as 
Undeclared and must declare a major later. The Undeclared student is encouraged to 
discuss interests and goals with his or her academic advisor, professors, or personnel 
in the Academic Advising Office or Evening Resource Center to assist in identifying a 
major. In addition, the Career Development Center provides extensive career guidance 
and self-assessment for those wishing to explore possible fields of study. 



62 Academic Affairs Information 



College policy requires a student to declare a major at 60 credit hours. If there is a 
delay in declaring a major or there is a change in major, the time needed to complete 
degree requirements may be extended. To declare or change a major, a student should 
contact the Academic Advising Office to complete a Request for Change in Student 
Record form and an academic advisor will be assigned from the new major. The student 
must follow all degree requirements in the major at the time the major is declared. 

ACADEMIC MINORS 

Minors are academic credentials earned by students in an area other than their major. To 
complete a minor, a student must complete a minimum of 1 5 credits and a maximum of 
20 credits of coursework, which may include both upper- and lower-division courses 
as defined by the specific requirements of the department offering the minor. 

All students completing a minor must earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 
in these designated courses, and take a minimum of nine credits of coursework in the 
minor at York College of Pennsylvania to have their minor appear on their transcript. 

DECLARING A MINOR/DOUBLE MAJOR 

A student interested in pursuing a minor or a double major should contact the Academic 
Advising Office and complete a Request for Change in Student Record form. While 
the student declaring a second major continues to work closely with the academic 
advisor in the primary major field of study for careful academic planning, it is also 
important to meet with an academic advisor in the second major to make certain that 
all degree requirements are fulfilled in the additional major or minor. 



GRADUATION 



A student expecting to graduate from York College must file a degree application 
during the final semester on campus. To apply for graduation, a student must complete 
an Application for Graduation form in the Records Office and pay a graduation fee at 
the Business Office by September 15 for December graduation, February 5 for May 
graduation, or by July 15 for August graduation. Every student who intends to graduate 
MUST complete the application and pay the graduation fee whether or not he/she wishes 
to participate in the commencement ceremony. Commencement ceremonies are held 
twice a year in May and December. Students who meet the graduation requirements 
in August are invited to participate in either the May or December commencement. 
Graduation regalia are purchased directly from the College Bookstore. 

A student may receive only one degree in a given semester. For example, a student 
may not receive an associate degree and a baccalaureate degree in the same semester. 
In addition, a student may receive one associate degree and one baccalaureate degree 
in that order from York College (see Programs of Study section). 

To earn a degree awarded in May, a student may complete the final degree 
requirement by enrolling in the mini-mester session for no more than one academic 
course and/or physical education course for a maximum of four credits. Students 



Academic Affairs information 63 



completing graduation requirements during any other summer sessions will receive 
their diploma in late August and are invited to participate in the May or December 
commencement ceremonies. Students graduating in May. August, or December are 
considered graduates of that calendar year. 

Late application for graduation will result in an additional fee and a significant 
delay in the receipt of the diploma. It is imperative that application for a degree be 
made by the deadline published each semester. 

AWARDING OF A SECOND DEGREE 

A student holding an associate or baccalaureate degree from another accredited college 
may pursue courses at York College leading toward a second degree (either associate 
or baccalaureate) provided the following conditions are met: 

1 . The candidate must meet the departmental requirements established for the 
major as published in the College Catalog. The department chair will review 
the student's academic record and indicate the additional courses that will be 
necessary to complete the degree requirements. 

2. The candidate must complete a minimum of the last 30 semester hours of the 
major at York College. 

3. The candidate has applied for and been accepted for admission to York 
College. 

AWARDING OF AN ADDITIONAL MAJOR 

A student holding a baccalaureate degree from York College of Pennsylvania may not 
receive a second degree from the College, but may elect to pursue courses leading 
toward a second baccalaureate-level major provided the following conditions are 
met: 

1 . The student must submit an additional application for admission to the 
director of Admissions and formally matriculate in the new major. 

2. The candidate must meet the departmental requirements as published in the 
College Catalog. The department chair will review the student's records and 
indicate any additional courses that will be required to complete the student's 
major requirements. 

3. The student must complete the Application for Additional Major available in 
the Records Office at the beginning of the semester in which the major will 
be completed. The additional major note will be posted on the transcript at 
the same time as degree notes are posted. An additional diploma WILL NOT 
be issued. 

4. Students who complete a second major in a discipline associated with a new 
degree designation may request that the degree designation for their program 
be revised to reflect the second major. Thus, a student whose original York 
College degree was a B.A. may request that their degree designation be 
changed to a B.S. upon completion of a second major in a discipline for 
which the B.S. degree is granted, or vice versa. 



64 Academic Affairs Information 



GRADUATION HONORS 



Students are eligible for graduation honors based upon their entire academic college 
record (which includes the previous academic record of transfer students). Transfer 
students may be eligible for graduation honors after a minimum of 60 credit hours of 
academic work are completed at York College. Graduation honors will be awarded 
on the basis of the cumulative GPA of all York College and all previously completed 
college work. Graduation honors recognized by York College are: 

1 . Summa Cum Laude: 3 .90 or above 

2. Magna Cum Laude: 3 .70-3 .89 

3. Cum Laude: 3.50-3.69 

Because the fall and spring Commencement ceremonies occur before all of a 
student's final semester grades have been tabulated. Graduation Honors published at 
Commencement will be based on the student's cumulative GPA prior to their final 
semester of coursework. However, the Graduation Honors noted on the student's 
official transcript will be based on the student's final cumulative GPA. 

SPECIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

An Independent Study is a well-defined individual research project supervised by a 
faculty member and undertaken without formal instruction or meeting times. Such 
a study affords students an opportunity to conduct in-depth research on a special 
topic without regular class meetings or formal instruction. While an Independent 
Study project involves a reduction in formal teaching, effective Independent Study is 
characterized by an increase in student responsibility and initiative in both research 
and the learning process. 

A student who wishes to apply for an Independent Study project must have 
completed a minimum of 60 credits with a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher prior 
to application. An application form, available in the academic department, Advising 
and Registrar's offices, and the Evening Resource Center, should be completed by 
the student. The application must include a comprehensive summary describing the 
nature, objectives, and evaluation format of the study along with approval from the 
faculty supervisor and department chairperson. Completed forms should be submitted 
to the Registrar's Office to be entered on the student's schedule. The deadline for 
submitting such applications is the last day of the Drop/ Add period. 

INTERNSHIP 

An internship is an elective educational experience that offers students the opportunity 
to earn academic credit for experiential learning outside the classroom. Internships 
are designed to enhance a student's professional preparation and career opportunities 
and are available to eligible York College students. To earn academic credit, the 



Academic Affairs Information 65 



internship must be completed at an approved site where the on-site supervisor has 
agreed to provide the intern with structured learning experiences that will assist them 
in achieving specific learning objectives. In addition, the student must complete an 
Internship Application, including detailed learning objectives for the course, and 
receive the approval of the Department sponsoring the internship and from the College 
Internship Coordinator prior to beginning the on-site experience. 

Internship Study is available to matriculated students who have earned 60 or more 
credits and a 2.50 or higher cumulative grade point average at the time of application. 
A minimum of 120 hours on site is required to earn three internship credits: students 
are limited to participation in two different internships for a maximum of six credit 
hours of Internship Study in a baccalaureate program. Internship application forms, 
available in the Career Development Center or department chairs' offices, must be 
completed by the last day of the Drop/Add period for the semester. 

SERVICE LEARNING 

York College is committed to providing service learning opportunities that will allow 
students to contribute to the community while obtaining valuable experience and 
enhanced employment credentials. Volunteer programs at York reflect that students 
can obtain valuable life experience through service learning and that employers 
frequently seek graduates who have been constructively involved in their community. 
Service learning opportunities are available in a variety of organizations and can be 
selected based on a student's major or area of academic interest. Students interested 
in participating in service learning should contact the Career Development Center or 
Student Activities Office. 

FRESHMAN HONORS PROGRAM 

This program focuses on the academically motivated student's first year, as he or she 
transitions to the college environment. It provides incoming students with a smaller 
community of students for that very important first year, giving them the basis for 
finding other supportive student academic and social communities at the college. 
Students use the program as a base from which to branch out into other areas during 
their time at York College. 

The Freshman Honors Program includes the following features: 

Honors Discussion: The heart of the program is a weekly one-credit seminar style, 
discussion-based course each semester. Together, faculty and students will read, listen, 
watch, discuss, write, and respond to and challenge each other to develop, think, and 
create! Previous students of the Honors Program will assist with Honors Discussion, 
contributing their mentorship to incoming freshmen to the Program. 

Enrichment Activities: There are several enrichment activities per semester, 
including cultural events (special exhibitions, concerts, plays), museums, and dining 
experiences. Previous enrichment activities included a trip to the National Aquarium 
in Baltimore, the Maryland Renaissance Faire, the York Symphony, and the Baltimore 
Museum of Art. 



66 Academic Affairs information 



Academics: The program provides several advanced freshman-level courses, including 
Academic Writing and Information Literacy. Additionally, program participants are 
placed together in other specified regular courses, so that they can continue to build 
upon the community fostered by the Freshman Honors Program and Honors Discussion. 
This will not infringe upon courses mandated by declared major programs. 

There is a one-credit additional fee for the program, per semester. That fee will cover 
costs associated with enrichment activities and administration of the Program. 

STUDY ABROAD 

Matriculated students at York College are encouraged to explore the opportunities for 
academic study in another country as part of their degree program. The College has 
established special affiliation agreements with the following institutions: York St. John 
University in York, England; Huron University in London, England; Honam University 
in Kwangju, Korea; Sophia University in Tokyo, Japan; Ponificia Universidad Catolica 
in Quito, Ecuador; and Cemanahuac Educational Community in Cuernavaca, Mexico. 
These affiliations allow students to plan a study abroad with the assurance that courses 
taken at these institutions will be accepted at York College for degree completion. 
Additional study abroad opportunities are sponsored by other institutions with credits 
transferred to York College. Informational packets on these programs are also available 
in the Career Development Office. All students studying abroad must pay a $ 100 study 
abroad fee for the semester and complete an Off-Campus Study Approval form. This 
form must be submitted to the Registrar's Office prior to the study abroad semester. 

ADULT LEARNER EDUCATION 

For the benefit of adult learners, York College offers a full spectrum of credit courses 
in the evenings and throughout the summer. In addition, limited offerings are available 
on Saturdays during the fall and spring semesters. Courses are available to adult 
students who wish to work toward a degree, including associate, baccalaureate, and 
master's, or who wish to continue their education for cultural or vocational reasons. 

All courses offered dre selected from the College Catalog and are taught by 
members of the full-time and adjunct faculty. The schedule of offerings is designed to 
address the educational needs of adult learners who live and work in the surrounding 
communities. Individuals who are involved in business, education, and industry, and 
those wishing to broaden their interests in life through college instruction, benefit 
from the variety of classes and programs available through York College evening and 
summer courses. 

Students are encouraged to earn college credit for these courses, which may be 
applied toward degree requirements or used to enhance employment opportunities. 
An individual may enroll in courses as a matriculated or a non-matriculated student, 
according to York College admission requirements. 

Registration Policy for Part-Time Non-Matriculated Students: Any individual 
who wishes to enroll in courses as a part-time, non-matriculated student and who 
attended high school two years or more preceding the initial proposed date of 



Academic Affairs Information 67 



attendance at York College must have graduated from an approved secondary school 
or have earned a state equivalency diploma prior to enrollment at York College. 
Documentation for GED students must be attached to the course registration form. 
Individuals who have graduated from high school within two years preceding the 
initial proposed date of attendance at York College may enroll in courses only if they 
have been accepted into a degree program at York College or are in good standing at 
another accredited college or university. The Registrar reserves the right to contact the 
indicated institution to verify enrollment or acceptance. 

All college services are available for evening students, including parking, admission 
to all home athletic contests, concerts, financial aid, career services, and the use of the 
Student Union. 

The following majors can be completed through evening and Saturday courses: 

Baccalaureate Associate 

Accounting Business Administration 

Business Administration General Studies 

Computer Information Systems 

Management 

Marketing 

Nursing (RN Completion) 

Master's i 

MBA 

M.S. Nursing (except CRNA) 
M.Ed. 

EVENING RESOURCE CENTER 

Adult students are encouraged to visit the Evening Resource Center, located in the 
Campbell Hall lobby. Room 200. The Center is an adult student's primary resource for 
information and assistance at York College and is open when classes are in session, 
Monday through Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings during the fall and spring 
semesters, and Monday through Thursday evenings during Summer I and Summer II. 
Telephone: 717-815-1208. 

The Evening Resource Center provides the following services and resources to 
adult students: 

Academic advising 

Registration for courses and drop/add 

Payment of tuition and fees 

CLEP information and registration 

Parking stickers 

Many other helpful resources 



68 Academic Affairs Information 



SUMMER SEMESTERS 



Undergraduate and graduate classes are offered during 13 weeks throughout the 
summer, divided into four sessions. These classes are held during the day and in the 
evening. The summer classes are given for the following reasons: 

1 . To accommodate students in good standing at other colleges who desire to 
obtain credits for transfer to their own institutions. 

2. To assist continuing students who desire to accelerate their program toward 
early graduation without the pressure of a full-day schedule. 

3. To provide an opportunity for students to make up work in courses for which 
their performance fell below acceptable standards. 

4. To provide an opportunity for high school graduates who wish to enroll 
in college courses before beginning their first semester in August or 
September. 

5. To facilitate the program of part-time matriculated students who wish to 
further their program through summer study. 

6. To enable those high school students who have completed their junior year 
and who are recommended by their high school principal or high school 
guidance counselor to begin college studies. 

All college services are available to summer students, including parking, library 
services, scheduled summer activities using the gymnasium and swimming pool, 
residence facilities, advising and counseling services, and the use of the losue Student 
Union. 

Summer courses are of the same quality and number of class hours as those in the 
academic year and most are taught by full-time faculty members. Students may enroll 
in up to four credits during the mini-mester and up to a maximum of seven credits 
during Summer I or Summer II. 

Brochures are provided for both the evening and summer semesters. They may be 
obtained by either writing or calling: 

Registrar's Office 

York College of Pennsylvania 

York, PA 17403-3651 

Phone:(717)815-1273 

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

York College offers a variety of non-credit, technical, healthcare, professional, and 
personal development programs focused on company or professional-specific needs. 
These courses and selected credit courses are available on-site or on campus. 

Through the Glatfelter Telecommunications Center, the Office of Community 
Education has the capability to send and receive programs around the world. Included 
is the ability to produce, edit, and complete a video program. 

Funded programs focused on education, training and employment are developed 
and operated through the services of the Office of Community Education. These 
programs are generally formed in partnership with business and industry. 



Academic Affairs Information 69 

Information regarding the Office of Community Education and how it can help 
your business may be obtained by phone, fax, email, or in writing: 

Office of Community Education 
York College of Pennsylvania 
York, PA 17403-3651 
Telephone: (717) 815-1451 
Fax:(717)849-1628 
email: oced@ycp.edu 




PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 71 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 72 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 72 

ACADEMIC MAJORS 76 

ACADEMIC MINORS 77 

DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS AND REQUIREMENTS 78 

DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 79 

Behavioral Sciences I Criminal Justice I Psychology I Recreation and Leisure 
Administration I Sociology 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 101 

Biological Sciences I Nuclear Medicine Technology I Respiratory Care I Secondary 
Education -Biology 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 123 

Master of Business Administration I Accounting I Business Administration I Computer 
Information Systems I Economics I Engineering Management I Entrepreneurship I 
Finance / Management I Marketing 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 1 66 

Master of Education I Elementary Education I Elementary Education and Special 
Education I Secondary Education I General Music Education I Sport Management 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND HUMANITIES 206 

English Literary Studies I Philosophy I Professional Writing I Secondary Education- 
English I Spanish I Theatre 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 223 

History I International Relations I Political Science I Secondary Education— Social Studies 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC, ART, AND COMMUNICATION 237 

Fine Art I Graphic Design I Speech Communication t Mass Communication I Public 
Relations I General Music Education I Music Industry and Recording Technology I Music 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 269 

Master of Nursing I Nursing 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 278 

Chemistry I Clinical Laboratory Science I Computer Science I Engineering (Computer, 
Electrical, Mechanical) I Forensic Chemistry I Mathematics I Secondary Education— 
General Science I Secondary Education— Mathematics 

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 316 

Self-Designed Major I General Studies I Women 's and Gender Studies Minor 



70 




Programs of Study 



INTRODUCTION 



York College is dedicated to serving the needs of its students by providing a quality 
learning experience that prepares graduates for productive roles in society. At York, 
we believe the collegiate experience for students should facilitate both intellectual and 
personal growth, and encourage the development of lifelong learning skills. In support 
of this philosophy, the College offers a program of studies that provides over 50 degree 
options in baccalaureate disciplines, plus associate degree and minor programs. 

SATISFYING PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Students are reminded of their responsibility to monitor degree program requirements 
and to plan their schedule of courses according to the degree program requirements 
in effect at the time of their matriculation into the academic program. Students should 
work with their academic advisors when planning or changing schedules and should 
contact the Office of Academic Advising or the Registrar if they have questions or 
concerns regarding program requirements. While academic advisors and other staff 
make every effort to be conscientious and informed, the student has a personal 
responsibility for ensuring that all graduation standards and requirements will be met 
during their program of study. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Specific requirements and recommended curricula for each baccalaureate degree 
program are described in the Departmental Programs section of this chapter. The 
general requirements for earning a baccalaureate degree at York College, which apply 
to all departmental bachelor's degree programs, are: 

1. Successful completion of at least 124 credit hours and matriculation in a 
specific academic program. To satisfy the College's residence requirement, 
the last 30 of these credits must be earned at York College. 

2. Achievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. In certain 
majors, a higher minimum grade point average may be required for degree 
completion. 

3. Successful completion of the designated program requirements for a specific 
major and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in the major 
as specified by the departmental curriculum in the Departmental Programs 
section of this chapter. 

4. Completion of the General Education Requirements for baccalaureate majors 
and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in these courses as 
specified in the General Education section of this chapter. 

71 



72 Programs of Study 



At the beginning of the semester in which the student hopes to complete all degree 
requirements, the student must submit an application for a degree. This application 
should be obtained from, and returned to, the Records Office during the first three 
weeks of the semester. 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Specific requirements and recommended curricula for each degree program are described 
in the Departmental Programs section of this chapter. The general requirements for 
earning an associate degree at York College, which apply to all departmental associate 
degree programs, are: 

1. Successful completion of at least 62 credit hours and matriculation in a 
specific academic program. To satisfy the College's residency requirement, 
the last 30 of these 62 credits must be earned at York College. 

2. Achievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. In some 
associate degree majors, a higher minimum grade point average may be 
required for degree completion. 

3. Successful completion of the designated program requirements of a specific 
major and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in designated 
courses in the major as specified by the departmental curriculum in the 
Departmental Programs section of this chapter. 

4. Completion of the General Education Requirements for associate degree 
majors and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in these 
courses as specified in the General Education section of this chapter. 

At the beginning of the semester in which the student hopes to complete all degree 
requirements, they must submit an application for a degree. This application should 
be obtained from and returned to the Records Office during the first three weeks of 
the semester. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE 
DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

All baccalaureate degree candidates must complete the Common Core Requirements, 
Area Distribution Requirements, and General Education Elective Requirements for 
the General Education program as described below. Courses used to complete General 
Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

COMMON CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Courses in the common core of study must be completed with a minimum grade of 2.0. 
Based on previous educational performance, students may be required to complete 
additional courses in the core to achieve the required level of competency in each area, 
or they may be exempted through the admissions placement or credit by examination 
process. The mathematics requirement may be satisfied by the completion of MAT 1 1 1 , 
or a higher-level mathematics course. 



Programs of Study 73 

WRTW2 Analytical Reading and Writing (3 credits): 

This course will provide students with guided practice in the types of analytical reading 
necessary for mature academic writing and for success in upper-division courses in 
all disciplines. Students will learn strategies for summarizing and analyzing complex 
reading materials, and for incorporating reading material into their own writing. They 
will also analyze similarities and differences in various academic styles, develop 
processes for producing thoughtfully revised prose, and practice standard conventions 
of the academic writing. 

WHT202 Academic Writing (3 credits): 

Building upon the skills learned in WRT102, this course provides students with guided 
practice in writing academic papers and in using their research toward public modes 
of writing. Students will learn techniques crucial to the writing required in upper- 
division courses and future careers: focusing a topic and line of inquiry; developing 
and following a research plan; incorporating researched materials into a scholarly 
argument; developing a consistent and appropriate style; and revising carefully to 
produce polished documents. Prerequisite: WRT102 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
Students are required to complete WRT202 within the first 45 credits of their program 
of study. 

CM104 Human Communication (3 credits): 

This course will help students learn to use and evaluate effective communication 
behaviors. By using and analyzing the techniques of intrapersonal. interpersonal, small 
group, organizational, public, and mass communication, students will obtain the basic 
competencies required for successful verbal and non-verbal communication. 

MAT! 7 7 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in Mathematics 
(3 credits): 

This course will emphasize the use of mathematics to solve problems and will present 
situations where students develop critical thinking skills. Topics may include problem- 
solving strategies, symbolism and algebra, functions and relations, geometry, discrete 
mathematics, probability and statistics, and deductive proof. 

IFL101 Information Literacy (2 credits): 

The goal of this course is to assist students in developing skills that will enable them 
to function as information-literate individuals capable of using and applying current 
information technology. Students in this course will learn to determine when information 
is required, and will develop skills in acquiring information using library resources 
and computer technologies. Students will learn effective searching, evaluation of 
information, and use of the Internet. They will also discuss the implications of living 
in a digital society. 



74 Programs of Study 



PE Physical Education Courses (2 credits): 

Physical education courses are either 1/2 credit (half of a semester), one credit, or two 
credit hours. Two credit hours of physical education are required for graduation, and 
students should select the course or courses of their choice to fulfill this requirement. 

AREA DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS 

Each student must select courses to satisfy the following Area Distribution Requirements 
from the list developed by the department and approved by the Academic Programs 
Committee (see below). A minimum of 12 credits must be at the 200 level or above. 
Courses may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6 credits) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits) 

Area III: Laboratory Sciences (6-8 credits) 

Area IV: American Civilization/Government; Western Civilization (6 credits) 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language: 

(6 credits in one of these two areas of study ; if language is selected , both courses 
must be in the same language) 

COURSES THAT WILL SATISFY AREA DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS: 

Courses that can be used to satisfy the Area Distribution Requirements of the General 
Education program have been developed by individual departments and approved by 
the Curriculum Committee of the Academic Senate. These courses are marked in the 
Course Descriptions chapter of this catalog, and are presented by course code in the 
list below. 

Area I: Fine Arts and IHumanities: 

ART101.ART112,ART114,ART116,ART202/204,ART203/205, ART210,ART211, 
ART215, ART225, ART240, ART245, ART265, ART266, ART270, ART280, 
ART295, ART315, ART316, ART320, ART330, ART365, ART366. ART370, 
ART380, ART390, ART391, ART392, ART393, ART394, ART395, FLM216, 
FLM220, FLM316, FLM362, HUM230, HUM242, LIT160, LIT200, LIT281, 
LIT282, LIT283, LIT284, LIT285, LIT286, LIT291, LIT323, LIT324, LIT341, 
LIT342, LIT343, LIT344AVGS344, LIT347, LIT382AVGS382, LIT383, LIT390, 
LIT391, LIT395, LIT416, MUS150, MUS151, MUS152, MUS153, MUS154, 
MUS155, MUS160, MUS161, MUS162, MUS163, MUS164, MUS165, MUS166, 
MUS167, MUS168, MUS169, MUS170. MUS171, MUS172, MUS173, MUS174, 
MUS175, MUS176, MUS177, MUS181, MUS182, MUS200, MUS245, MUS250, 
MUS251, MUS252, MUS253, MUS254, MUS255, MUS260, MUS261, MUS262, 
MUS263, MUS264, MUS265, MUS266, MUS267, MUS268, MUS269. MUS270, 
MUS271, MUS272, MUS273, MUS274, MUS275, MUS276. MUS277, MUS281, 



Programs of Study 75 



MUS286, MUS287, MUS288, MUS290, MUS299, MUS300, MUS350, MUS351, 
MUS352. MUS353, MUS354, MUS355, MUS360, MUS361. MUS362, MUS363. 
MUS364, MUS365. MUS366, MUS367, MUS368. MUS369, MUS370, MUS371, 
MUS372, MUS373, MUS374, MUS375, MUS376, MUS377, MUS450, MUS451, 
MUS452, MUS453. MUS454, MUS455. MUS460, MUS461, MUS462. MUS463, 
MUS464, MUS465, MUS466, MUS467, MUS468, MUS469, MUS470. MUS471, 
MUS472, MUS473, MUS474, MUS475, MUS476, MUS477, PHL221. PHL222, 
PHL223 , PHL224, PHL226, PHL23 1 , PHL235 , PHL236, PHL238 . PHL240. PHL32 1 , 
PHL33 1 . PHL341 , PHL342, PHL346, PHL35 1 , PHL380/WGS380, PHL382, PHL390, 
PHL392REL265.REL266,REL268,REL270,REL275,REL369,THE254,THE354. 
THE416, WGS344, WGS380. WGS382 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences: 

ANT220. ANT300. ANT330, ECO200. ECO201. ECO300. G243, G331. G332, 
G336, G341 . G344. G345. G470 through G479. GER312, GER315/215, H224, H225, 
H226, H245, H306, H307, H309, H310, H316, H317, H318, H333. H334, H335, 
H340AVGS340, H342/WGS342. H351. H352. H353, H354, H355, H356, H357, 
H358, H371. H372. H411, H420, H427. H428, H441, H450, H470. H471, H472. 
H473, H474, H475, H476, H477, H478, H479. H483, MGT250/150, OBD325/225, 
PSIOO, PS242. PS260. PS262, PS302, PS303. PS305, PS306, PS312. PS360, PS361. 
PS362, PS363, PS368, PS369, PS370, PS371/H371, PS372/H372. PS471, PS472, 
PS473, PS474. PS475, PS476, PS477, PS478. PS479, PS480, PSYIOO, PSY221/320, 
PSY227, PSY230/341, REClOl, SOCIOO, SOC220, SOC225/WGS225. SOC360, 
WGS200, WGS225, WGS340, WGS342, WGS360 

Area III: Laboratory Sciences: 

BIO110.BIO112,BIO120,BIO122/212,BIO124,BIO128,BIO150,BIO152,BIO206, 
BIO208, BIO210, BI0214, BI0216, BIO220, BI0222, BIO230, BI0232, BIO240, 
CHM102/202, CHM114, CHM116, CHM122, CHM134, CHM136, CHM146, 
CHM234, CHM236, ESS152, ESS154, PHYllO, PHY112, PHY160, PHY162, 
PHY260. PHY262, PSC152, PSC154 

Area IV: Western Civilization, American Civilization, 
and American Government: 

H121,H122,H219,H220,H221,H222,PS141,PS142 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language: 

ARBlOl, ARB102, FRNlOl, FRN102, FRN201, FRN202, FRN203, FRN205, 
FRN315,FRN316,G348,G350,GRM101,GRM102,GRM201,GRM202,GRM301, 
GRM315, GRM316, H227, H228, H233, H234, H250, H303, H305, H330, H332, 
INTlOl, INT143, INT144, INT145, INT146, INT147, INT150, INT201, ITLlOl, 
ITL102. LATlOl, LAT102, PS243, PS244, PS245, PS246, PS247, PS250, RUSlOl, 
RUS102, SPNIOI , SPN102, SPN201 , SPN202, SPN205, SPN206, SPN301 , SPN304, 
SPN315, SPN316, SPN415, SPN416. SPN435, SPN436 



76 Programs of Study 



GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES 

Students must complete a minimum of 12 elective credits. These elective courses may 
be used to complete a minor, but no more than six credits of electives may be satisfied 
by physical education activity courses. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REOUIREMENTS FOR ASSOCIATE 
DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

All associate degree candidates must complete all courses in the Common Core 
Requirements (WRT102, WRT202, CM 104, M AT 1 1 1, IFL 101, Physical Education), 
and achieve a grade of 2.0 or higher in each course. In addition, associate degree 
candidates will complete a minimum of three credits in each distribution requirement 
area, and two of the five courses completed must be at the 200 level or above. 



ACADEMIC MAJORS 



MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

Master of Business Administration 
Master of Education 
Master of Science in Nursing 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

Accounting 

Behavioral Science 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Clinical Laboratory Science 

Computer Engineering 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Economics 

Elementary Education 

Elementary Education / Special 

Education 
Secondary Education: 

Biology 

English 

General Science 

Mathematics 

Social Studies 
Electrical Engineering 



Engineering Management 

English Literary Studies 

Entrepreneurship 

Finance 

Fine Arts 

Forensic Chemistry 

General Music Education 
(K-12) 

Graphic Design 

History 

International Relations 

Management 

Marketing 

Mass Communication 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 

Music (B.A.) 

Music (B.S. with Studies 
in Music Industry and 
Recording Technology) 

Nuclear Medicine Technology 



Programs of Study 77 



Nursing 
Philosophy 
Political Science 
Professional Writing 
Psychology 
Public Relations 
Recreation and Leisure 
Administration 



Respiratory Care 

Self-Designed Major 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Speech Communication 

Sport Management 

Theatre 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Criminal Justice 

Fine Art 

General Studies 



Healthcare Coding 

Mass Communication 

Music 

Physics 

Political Science 

Respiratory Care 



ACADEMIC MINORS 



The academic departments have developed a number of programs leading to an 
academic minor. All students completing a minor must earn a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 or higher in these designated courses, and take a minimum of nine 
credits of coursework in the minor at York College of Pennsylvania to have their minor 
appear on their transcript. The minor must be declared on the baccalaureate degree 
application and will be verified by the department chair at the time of graduation. 
Courses used to complete a minor may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. A minor 
consisting of 15 to 20 credit hours may be obtained in the areas listed below: 



Accounting 
Advertising 
African and African- American 

Studies 
American History 
Anthropology 

Applied Youth Development 
Art History 
Biology 

Business Administration 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Creative Writing 
Criminal Justice 
Criminalistics 



Economics 

Entrepreneurial Studies 

Film Studies 

Finance 

Fine Art 

French 

Geography 

German 

Gerontology 

Hospitality Marketing 

Human Resource Management 

Human Services 

Information Systems 

International Business 

International Management 



78 Programs of Study 



International Studies 
Leadership and Organization 

Development 
Literary Studies 
Management 
Marketing 

Marketing Communication 
Marketing Management 
Mathematics 
Music 

Music Industry 
Operations Management 
Philosophy 
Photography 
Physics 
Political Science 



Professional Writing 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Public Relations 

Quantitative Management 

Religious Studies 

Retailing 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Education 

Speech Communication 

Theatre 

Visual Communication 

Women's and Gender Studies 

World History 



DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS AND REQUIREMENTS 

The programs of study offered at York College are provided through the College's 10 
academic departments: 



Department: 

Behavioral Sciences 

Biological Sciences 

Business Administration 

Education 

English & Humanities 

History & Political Science 

Music, Art, Communication 

Nursing 

Physical Sciences 

Schmidt Library 



Office: 


Chairperson: 


LS315D 


Dr. Joshua Landau 


LS206A 


Dr. Ronald Kaltreider 


BA201 


Dr. Mary Meisenhelter 


A310A 


Dr. Michael McGough 


HUM 160 


Dr. Gabriel Abudu 


HUM 101 


Dr. Peter Levy 


MAC206A 


Dr. Brian Furio 


MKN138 


Dr. Jacquelin Harrington 


C211A 


Dr. David Kaplan 


L204 


Prof. Susan Campbell 




DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Behavioral Sciences 

*he Behavioral Sciences major offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study 
of human behavior. All students in the major must complete a core of courses 
designed to expose them to the concepts, theories, and research methodologies used 
in the behavioral sciences. Beginning in the sophomore year, students, in conjunction 
with their academic advisors, elect to concentrate in one of four areas. Behavioral 
Science majors cannot have a dual major with Sociology. The ai^ea selected will depend 
upon the student's future career or academic aspirations. 
The four concentration areas are: 

• Anthropology 

• Applied Behavioral Sciences 

• Gerontology 

• Human Services 

The major is designed for students who either want to work in a socially oriented 
occupation or desire the ability to combine behavioral sciences with other applied 
disciplines. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Behavioral Science must complete 
a minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not 
be taken on a pass/fail basis, and credits earned in WRTIOO may not be applied to 
degree requirements. Students majoring in Behavioral Sciences may not receive more 
than one in the major core requirements. In addition, 18 credit hours within the major 
must be taken from the York College Behavioral Science major holdings, in residence, 
and students must maintain a 2.0 average. Students will also be required to complete 
a standardized outcomes assessment test. With the exception of the Anthropology 
concentration, a Behavioral Science major may not minor in Sociology. Students with 
an Anthropology concentration may minor in Sociology if they take live Sociology 
courses outside the Behavioral Science core. Students with a concentration in Human 
Services may not minor in Human Services, and students with a concentration in 
Gerontology may not minor in Gerontology. 

The required courses for the Behavioral Sciences major are: 

A core of seven courses (21 credits) will be required of all Behavioral Science majors. 
These courses will expose students to the concepts and theories of the behavioral 

79 



80 Programs of Study 



sciences and deliver the knowledge and experience necessary for either academic or 
applied research. The courses in the core will be: 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

SOC335 Research Methodology 

SOC336 Statistics/Research Methodology II 

BEH490 Behavioral Science Seminar 

One of the following: 

ANT220 Cultural Anthropology 
ANT210 Physical Anthropology 

One of the following: 

SOC230 Development of Sociological Theory 
SOC235 Contemporary Sociological Theory 
PSY243 Social Psychology 

Behavioral Science Concentration Areas 

Majors will select fi-om one of four possible concentration areas: 

• Anthropology 

• Applied Behavioral Sciences 

• Gerontology 

• Human Services 

Each concentration area is composed of six or seven courses (18-21 credits). Students 
will also be required to complete 15 credits of Behavioral Science electives. Thus, the 
major will require 54-57 credits of coursework. 

Anthropology (21 credits) 

Three required courses: 

ANT220 Cultural Anthropology 

ANT210 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 

ANT325 Culture and Personality 

Any four of the following: 

ANT230 Archaeology 

ANT300 Food and Culture 

ANT 302 Applied Anthropology 

ANT3 1 Advanced Physical Anthropology 

ANT330 Anthropology and Religion 

ANT350 Anthropology of Aging 

ANT390 Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology 



Behavioral Sciences Department 81 

ANT 392 Anthropology and Medicine 
BEH495-496 Internship in Anthropology 

Applied Behavioral Sciences (18 credits) 

Four required courses: 

SOC340 Urban Sociology 

SOC355 Program Design and Evaluation 

SOC410 Population Trends 

SOC415 Grant Writing for Nonprofit Agencies 

One of the following: 

S0C3 10 Sociology of Organizations 
PSY363 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 
OBD325 Organizational Behavior 

One of the following: 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 
MGT150 Principles of Management 

Gerontology (18-21 credits) 

Five required courses: 

BEH495 Internship 

GER215 Social Aspects of Aging 

GER3 1 2 Psychological Aspects of Aging 

GER316 Ethical Aspects of Aging 

GER410 Clinical Aspects of Aging 

One or two of the following: 

ANT350 Anthropology of Aging 

BIO106 Introduction to Body Structure and Function 

BIO 11 2 Fundamentals of Human Biology 

, GER320 Working with Older Adults 

GER330 Death, Dying, and Bereavement 

' GER390/39 1/392 Selected Topics in Gerontology 

GER498/499 Gerontology Independent Study 

H300 Oral History: Techniques and Research 

HCC225 Healthcare Insurance Reimbursement 

MGT 1 50 Principles of Management 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

NUR201 Human Development and Health Care 

PS 151 Introduction to Public Administration 

REClOl Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society 

REC400 Therapeutic Recreation and Aging 

RT105 Medical Terminology for Health Care Professionals 



82 Programs of Study 



SOC225AVGS225 The Family 

SOC240 Theory and Policy for the Human Services Professional 

SC0345 Human Service Techniques 

SOC415 Grant Writing for Nonprofit Agencies 

Human Services (21 credits) 

Five required courses: 

SOC240 Theory and Policy for the Human Services Professional 

SOC355 Program Design and Evaluation 

SOC345 Human Services Techniques 

SOC4 1 5 Grant Writing for Nonprofit Agencies 

BEH495 Internship 

One of tlie following: 

PS Y22 1 Child and Adolescent Development 
GER3 1 2 Psychological Aspects of Aging 

One of the following: 

SOC305 Working with Children and Youth 
GER320 Working with Older Adults 
C J A 1 1 Juvenile Delinquency (with permission of instructor) 



Behavioral Science (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Human Conmiunication 

Information Literacy 

Critical Thinking/Prob. Solv. Math 

General Psychology 

Introduction to Sociology 

Area 1 Distribution Requirements 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
6 
6 
_2 
31 



Sophomore Year 

Anthropology 

Academic Writing 

Behavioral Science Elective 

Sociological Theory 

Area III Distribution Requirements 

Concentration Course 

Elective Courses 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6-8 
3 

12 

33-35 



Behavioral Sciences Department 83 



Junior Year Credits 

Social Psychology 3 

Research Methodology I 3 

Statistics/Research Methodology II 3 

Concentration Courses 9 

Behavioral Science Electives 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Electives Courses 6 

30 

Senior Year Credits 

Concentration Courses 6 

Behavioral Science Electives 9 

Area V Distribution 3 

Behavioral Science Seminar 3 

Electives Courses 9 

30 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice 

The Criminal Justice curriculum is designed to: (1) provide students with a 
basic understanding and comprehensive overview of the criminal and juvenile 
justice systems and security/asset protection lield; (2) encourage a theoretical 
and informed inquiry into justice and security practices and policies; (3) develop 
introductory skills in research methodology and statistics; and to (4) prepare 
students for professional careers in criminal justice and private security as well as 
to provide a foundation for the advanced study of criminal justice, law, or other 
graduate studies. 

Experiential learning (internship) opportunities are available with various 
agencies within the criminal justice system. Experiential learning is arranged through 
the Criminal Justice faculty. The application process must be completed prior to the 
semester when the experiential learning is to commence. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Criminal Justice must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Criminal Justice must maintain a 2.0 average 
in all required courses, and will be required to complete a standardized outcome 
assessment test. Students cannot have more than two Criminal Justice courses with a 
grade less than 2.0. 



84 Programs of Study 



The required courses for all Criminal Justice majors are: 

PSYIOO General Psychology* 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology* 

SOC320 Criminology 

CJAlOl Introduction to Criminal Justice* 

CJA 1 1 Juvenile Delinquency 

CJA203 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 

CJA295 Criminal Justice Research Methods I* 

CJA302 Criminal Law 

CJA334 Policing in America 

CJA336 Judicial Process 

CJA337 Punishment/Corrections 

CJA360 Experiential Learning in Criminal Justice 

CJA396 Criminal Justice Statistics* 

CJA491 Senior Seminar 

In addition, students must select a minimum of nine credits from the 300/400 level 
Criminal Justice electives listed below: 

CJA303 Gender and Crime 

CJA304 Legal Standards Asset Protection 

CJA305 Criminal Investigation 

CJA310 Victimology 

CJA3 1 1 Crime Prevention and Physical Security 

CJA323 Fire and Explosion Investigation 

CJA341 Criminal Procedure 

CJA347 Community Based Corrections 

CJA348 Juvenile Justice 

CJA349 Comparative Criminal Justice 

CJA362 Crime Scene Processing 

CJA364 Policing Communities 

CJA380 Special Topics in Criminal Justice 

CJA383 White Collar Crime 

CJA386 Death Investigation 

CJA401 Security Planning and Supervision 

CJA403 Conflict Analysis and Management 

CJA405 Substance Abuse and the Criminal Justice System 

CJA498 Independent Study 



*A grade of 2.0 or higher is required. 



Behavioral Sciences Department 85 



Criminal Justice (suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year 


Credits 


Analytical Reading and Writing 


3 


Academic Writing 


3 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


General Psychology 


3 


Introduction to Criminal Justice 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 


Physical Education 


2 


Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 


3 


Juvenile Delinquency 


3 


Area 1 Distribution Requirement 


3 


Free Electives 


3 




31 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 


3 


Criminal Justice Research Methods I 


3 


Area II Distribution Requirements 


6 


Area III Distribution Requirements 


6-8 


Criminal Justice Statistics 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Human Communication 


3 


Free Electives 


3 




30-32 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Criminology 


3 


Area IV Requirements 


6 


Free Electives 


3 


Criminal Law 


3 


Policing in America 


3 


Judicial Process 


3 


Punishment and Corrections 


3 


Experiential Learning in Criminal Justice 


3 


Criminal Justice Elective 


3 




30 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 


Criminal Justice Electives 


; 6 


Area I Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Free Electives 


16-18 



31-33 



86 Programs of Study 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology 

The Psychology major at York College of Pennsylvania is designed to provide students 
with the necessary background to pursue a number of professional careers within and 
related to psychology. Core and Area Requirements have been designated to provide 
the integral background for further educational and professional growth. Electives, 
both within and outside the psychology field, allow the student to concentrate on his 
or her individual career goals and needs. 

The selection and sequencing of these courses must be done with the advisement 
of the Psychology faculty. The Psychology faculty are prepared to assist each student 
in preparing for his or her career and graduate school goals. It is important that each 
Psychology major meet with an advisor at least once a semester. A program advising 
guide is available from advisors or is available online at http://faculty.ycp.edu/~cstrassl/ 
Advising/ Advising%20guides .htm. Students who wish to declare Psychology as a 
major after the first semester of the freshman year must see the Psychology Program 
Coordinator before scheduling courses. Contact the Administrative Assistant for 
Behavioral Sciences Department (717) 815-1375 to be connected with the Psychology 
Coordinator. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Psychology must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, complete the General Education Requirements of 
the College and complete graduating outcome assessments. Courses used to complete 
General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. No more than 
two courses in the major may be completed with a grade of 1 .0 or lower. 

Requirements for Major/Minor in Psychology: 

1 . To complete a major in Psychology, a minimum of 24 credit hours, including 
PSY370, PSY472, PSY490, and 15 credits of Psychology courses at the 200 
level or above must be completed at York College. 

2. A minor in Psychology requires 18 credit hours; a minimum of 12 credit 
hours must be completed at York College. 

3. 100-level or 200-level transfer courses in Psychology cannot be used to 
satisfy 300- or 400-level Psychology course requirements . These courses will 
be transferred as free electives. 

4. Child and Adolescent Development (PSY221), Adult Development 
(PS Y222), Abnormal Psychology (PSY230), and Psychological Aspects of 
Aging (PSY312) do not satisfy Psychology major requirements and will be 
given credit as free electives. 

5. 1 2 free elective credits must be outside the major area of Psychology. 

6. Psychology majors who have a Special Education minor should take PSY365 
Psychological Testing instead of SPE364 Educational Assessment. 

7. No more than two courses in the major may have a grade of 1 .0 or lower. 



Behavioral Sciences Department 87 



The required courses for all Psychology Majors are: 

PSYCHOLOGY CORE REQUIREMENTS 

PS Y 100 General Psychology 

PSY200 Essential Skills and Tools in Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

PS Y270 Design and Analysis I 

PS Y27 1 Design and Analysis II 

PS Y370 Design and Analysis III 

PSY472 History and Systems 

PSY490 Psychology Seminar 

PSYCHOLOGY AREA REQUIREMENTS 
PSY210 Fundamentals of Biopsychology 
PSY243 Social Psychology 
PSY307 Cognitive Psychology 
PSY321 Developmental Science 
PSY330 Adult Psychopathology 

The following are the Psychology electives. These courses are designed to assist the 
students in meeting their career goals. A minimum of three courses (nine credit hours) 
must be completed in Psychology electives. Students are to confer with their advisor 
concerning these courses. Please see the prerequisites for each course. 

PS Y227 Psychology of Exceptional Children 

PS Y309 Theories of Learning 

PSY310 Brain and Behavior 

PSY331 Child Psychopathology ■ 

PSY354 Sensation and Perception 

PSY363 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

PSY365 Psychological Testing* 

PSY375-399 Special Topics in Psychology (Topics vaty as available, 
individual topics are offered infrequently.) 

PSY381 Adult Psychopathology and the Media 

PSY421 Psychology Cooperative Internship** 

PSY422 Psychology Cooperative Internship** 

PS Y43 1 Senior Teaching Practicum* * * 

PSY432 Senior Teaching Practicum*** 

PSY440 Personality 

PSY441 Counseling Theories in Psychology 

PSY498 Independent Study in Psychology**** 

PSY499 Independent Study in Psychology**** 



♦Psychology majors who have Special Education minors should take PSY365 instead of SPE364. 

**A maximum of six credits is permitted for internship. 

***A maximum of two credits is permitted for senior teaching practicum. 

****A maximum of six credits is permitted for independent study in Psychology. 



88 Programs of Study 



Psychology Major (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 
1 St Semester 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3 

General Psychology 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

Physical Education 1 
2nd Semester 

Essential Skills and Tools of Psychology - 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Human Communication 3 
Choose one of the following: 

Social Psychology 3 or 

Fundamentals of Biopsychology 3 or 

Psychology of the Exceptional Child 3 

30 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Design and Analysis I and II 6 
Psychology Area Requirements and/or 

Electives 9 

Area Distribution Requirements 12-13 

Free Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 





31-32 


Junior Year ' 


Credits 


Design and Analysis III 
Psychology Area Requirements 
and/or Electives 


3 
9 


Area Distribution Requirement 
Free Electives 


6 

12-13 




30-31 


Senior Year 


Credits 


History and Systems of Psychology 
Psychology Seminar 
Psychology Elective 
Free Electives 


3 (1st semester) 

3 (2nd semester) 

3 

15-16 


Area Distribution Requirement 


6-7 



30-32 



Behavioral Sciences Department 89 



When selecting courses: Please consult the Psychology curriculum worksheet which 
was in effect when you declared the Psychology major, meet with your academic 
advisor, and review the advising guides available at http://faculty.ycp.edu/~cstrassl/ 
Advising/Advising%20guides .htm. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Recreation and Leisure Administration 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Recreation is accredited by the National Recreation 
and Park Association Council on Accreditation. 

Recreation and Leisure Administration Mission Statement: 

The Recreation and Leisure Administration Program at York College of Pennsylvania 
is designed to provide students with the necessary background to pursue a variety 
of professional careers within and related to the field. Core and Area Requirements 
have been designed to provide the integral background for further educational and 
professional growth. Electives, both within and outside the Recreation and Leisure 
Program, allow the students to concentrate on their individual career goals and needs. 

Recreation and Leisure Administration Program Goals 

The faculty of the Recreation and Leisure Administration Program intends that 
graduates of the Program will: 

a. Demonstrate the knowledge of Recreation and Leisure Administration needed 
to successfully pursue graduate education in the field; 

b. Possess the technical and conceptual skills required for entry-level professional 
careers in Recreation and Leisure service occupations; 

c. Be successful in utilizing their degree to obtain the appropriate certification 
for their emphasis area within the recreation and leisure field; 

d. Demonstrate leadership skills required for successful career advancement in 
recreation and leisure service occupations. 

Two areas of emphasis are available. The Community Recreation emphasis is 
geared toward professional preparation for careers in federal, state, and local public 
recreation and park agencies, private and voluntary agencies, armed forces, industrial 
recreation . commercial recreation . church recreation , and travel and tourism . Flexibility 
within this option will permit students to focus on a specific type of agency or setting. 
The Therapeutic Recreation emphasis prepares students for careers in health care and 
human service programs that serve individuals with disabilities. Examples include 
hospitals, treatment centers, specialized schools/camps, and long-term care facilities. 

Upon successful completion of all college and certification requirements . graduates 
with a Therapeutic Recreation emphasis are eligible to apply to take the examination 
for certification as a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist from the National 
Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification. Graduates with either emphasis are 
eligible to apply to take the examination as a Certified Park and Recreation Professional 
through the National Certification Board. 



90 Programs of Study 



The selection and sequencing of courses should be done through advisement by 
the Recreation and Leisure Administration faculty. Majors should see their advisor 
each semester. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Recreation must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Recreation must earn a 2.0 or higher in each of 
the major requirements, and may be required to complete a standardized outcomes 
assessment test. 

Thie required courses for all Recreation and Leisure Administration 
students are: 

PS Y 100 General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

REClOl Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society 

REC103 Leadership and Group Dynamics 

REC210 Recreation Programming 

REC22 1 Experiential Learning in Recreation 

REC3 1 1 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 

REC42 1-423 Directed Field Experience in Community Recreation 

and Leisure (9 credits) OR 

REC425-427 Directed Field Experience in Therapeutic Recreation 
and Leisure (9 credits) 

REC450 Recreation Administration 

REC49 1 Seminar in Recreation and Leisure 

Community Recreation Emphasis 

REC333 Organizing Community Recreation 

REC40 1 Management of Recreation and Park Facilities 

Selected Elective 

Choose one from: (BUS150, CM221, CM304, MGT150, MGT315, 
MKTIOO, MKT325, OBD380, PHL342, SOC415) 

OR 

Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis 

REC33 1 Leadership in Therapeutic Recreation 
REC343 Organizing Therapeutic Recreation 
REC400 Therapeutic Recreation and Aging 



Behavioral Sciences Department 91 



Recreation Electives (two courses from the following list): 
REC250 Special Events Planning 



REC310 

REC380-384, 393-394 

REC385-389 and REC392 

REC424 or REC428 

REC498 

SOC345 



Outdoor Recreation 

Selected Topics in Community Recreation 

Selected Topics in Therapeutic Recreation 

Recreation Directed Field Experience 

Independent Study 

Human Services Techniques 



Therapeutic Recreation Emphasis majors may also select from Community Recreation 
Emphasis requirements listed above. 

Community Recreation Emphasis majors may also select from Therapeutic Recreation 
Emphasis requirements listed above. 

Therapeutic Recreation Certification eligibility requires in addition to 
the above: 

PSY230 Abnormal Psychology 
NUR20 1 Human Development in Health Care 

One of the following Biology I Laboratory courses: 

BIO220/22 1 Human Anatomy and Physiology I/Laboratory OR 
BI0222/223 Human Anatomy and Physiology II/Laboratory 

Recreation and Leisure Administration Major (suggested course 
sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

(Both Community and Therapeutic Emphases) 

Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society 3 

Leadership and Group Dynamics — 3 

Analytical Reading and Writing ■. 3 

General Psychology ' 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Area I Distribution Requirements ; 3 

Area II Distribution Requirements 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Electives , ^ 

32 



Sophomore Year Credits 

(Both Community and Therapeutic Emphases) 

Recreation Programming 3 

Experiential Learning in Recreation 3 



92 Programs of Study 



Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 3 

Human Communication 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 
++(choice from above for therapeutic 

certification) OR Elective 3 

Physical Education 2 

Academic Writing 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 3-4 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Elective 3 

32-33 

Junior Year Credits 

(Therapeutic Emphasis) 

Area I Distribution Requirements 3 

Area II Distribution Requirements 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 3-4 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Recreation Electives 3 

-i~i-(choice from above for therapeutic 

certification) OR Elective 6 
Leadership in Therapeutic Recreation 
OR 

Organizing Therapeutic Recreation 3 

Therapeutic Recreation and Aging 3 
OR 

(Community Emphasis) 

Area I Distribution Requirements 3 

Area II Distribution Requirements 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 3-4 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Organizing Community Recreation 3 

Community Recreation Emphasis Elective 3 

Recreation Electives 3 

Electives 6 

30-31 

Senior Year Credits 

(Therapeutic Emphasis) 

Recreation Seminar 3 

Recreation Administration 3 

Recreation Elective 3 

Electives 7-9 



Behavioral Sciences Department 93 



Organizing Therapeutic Recreation OR 

Leadership In Therapeutic Recreation 3 

Directed Field Experience 9 



OR 


28-30 


(Community Emphasis) 
Recreation Seminar 


3 


Recreation Administration 


3 


Recreation Elective 


3 


Electives 

Recreation and Parks Facilities Management 

Directed Field Experience 


7-9 

3 
9 



28-30 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Sociology 



Sociology is the study of human behavior and group life. As a science, it examines how 
human experience is shaped by social forces. Sociologists use both quantitative and 
qualitative methods of social research in an effort to understand, generalize, and predict 
human behavior within society. Sociologists are also interested in developing and 
testing theories regarding how the social world is organized. Specifically, sociologists 
examine how social order is maintained, the origins of social conflict and social change, 
and the human assignment of meaning to objects, relationships, and events in everyday 
life. A major in Sociology is designed to provide preparation for pursuing graduate 
study and/or entry into vocations where sociological training is desirable (e.g. social 
agencies, personnel work in business, social planning in governmental agencies, and 
organizations in which survey research is conducted). Internships may be available 
with local agencies that allow selected students to apply theory to realistic situations. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Sociology must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Sociology must maintain a 2.0 average in 
all major requirements, and will be required to complete a standardized outcomes 
assessment test. 

Tlie required courses for the Sociology Major are: 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology , .u. , 

BEH490 Behavioral Science Seminar 

SOC220 American Social Problems 

SOC230 Development of Sociological Theory 

SOC235 Contemporary Sociological Theory 



94 Programs of Study 



SOC335 Research Methodology I 
SOC336 Statistics/Research Methodology II 



Seven of the following. ■ 



GER215 

PSY243 

SOC201 

SOC210 

SOC225/WGS225 

SOC240 

SOC301 

SOC302 

SOC305 

SOC310 

SOC315 

SOC320 

SOC330 

SOC340 

SOC345 

SOC355 

SOC360AVGS360 

SOC410 

SOC415 

SOC420-422 

SOC495-496 

SOC498-499 



Social Aspects of Aging 

Social Psychology 

Sociology of Family Violence 

Drug and Alcohol Addiction 

The Family 

Theory/Policy Human Services 

Environmental Sociology 

Sociology of Health and Illness 

Working w/Children and Youth 

Sociology of Organizations 

Ethnic and Minority Relations 

Criminology 

Sociology of Religion 

Urban Sociology 

Human Services Techniques 

Program Design and Evaluation 

Gender and Society 

Population Trends 

Grant Writing for Nonprofit Agencies 

Selected Topics in Sociology 

Sociology Internship* 

Independent Study* 



Sociology Major (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Human Communication 

Information Literacy 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 

General Psychology 

Introduction to Sociology 

Area I Distribution Requirements 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
6 
6 
2 
31 



Sophomore Year 
American Social Problems 
Sociology Elective 



Credits 

3 
3 



*See advisor prior to scheduling these courses. 



Development of Sociological Theory 
Contemporary Sociological Theory 
Academic Writing 
Area III Distribution Requirement 
Elective Courses* 



Junior Year 

Research Methodology I 

Statistics/Research Methodology II 

Sociology Electives 

Area III Distribution Requirement 

Area V Distribution Requirements 

Elective Courses* 



Behavioral Sciences Department 95 



3 

3 

3 

3-4 

15 



33-34 

Credits 
3 
3 



3-4 
6 
6 



30-31 



Senior Year 

Sociology Courses 

Behavioral Science/Sociology Seminar* 

Elective Courses* 



Credits 

9 

3 

18 

30 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

Associate of Science Degree in Criminal Justice: 

To be eligible for graduation, students must complete a minimum of 65 credits. In 
addition, students must maintain a 2.0 average in all major requirements, earn a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the College's residence requirements, 
and complete the Associate Degree General Education Requirements of the College. 

The required courses for the Criminal Justice Associate Degree are: 

CJ A 1 1 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJAllO Juvenile Delinquency 

CJA203 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 
AND 18 credits of 100/200-level courses in Accounting, Anthropology, Behavioral 
Sciences, Criminal Justice, Geography, Information Systems, Management, Political 
Science, Psychology, or Sociology 



Criminal Justice (suggested course sequence) 

Freshmen Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 



Credits 
3 
3 



*It is especially important to see your advisor before scheduling these courses. 



96 Programs of Study 



Critical Thinking & Problem Solving 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

Juvenile Delinquency 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 3 

Area II Distribution Requirements 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements _3 

29 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 2 

Ethical Issues 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Electives 7 

i , Criminal Justice Electives \5^ 

33 

Behavioral Sciences Department Minors: 

Students majoring in Criminal Justice may not minor in Criminal Justice but may 
minor in Criminalistics. However, with the exception of CJAlOl , none of the courses 
required for the Criminalistics minor may be used to fulfill requirements for the major 
or another minor. 

Anthropology Minor (18 credits) 

ANT2 1 Physical Anthropology 

ANT220 Cultural Anthropology 

ANT310 Advanced Physical Anthropology 

ANT325 Culture and Personality 

Any two of the following courses: 

ANT300 Food and Culture 

ANT302 Applied Anthropology 

ANT330 Anthropology of Religion 

ANT350 Anthropology of Aging 

ANT390, ANT391 Selected Topics Anthropology 

ANT392 Anthropology and Medicine 

INT 101 Introduction to Indo-European 

Languages and Folklore 

LIT320 Introduction to Linguistics 

BEH495, BEH496 Behavioral Sciences Cooperative Internship* 

ANT498 , ANT499 Independent Study in Anthropology 



'■Only special anthropological internships apply; see advisor six weeks prior to registration. 



Behavioral Sciences Department 97 



Applied Youth Development Minor (15 credits) 

BEH200 Introduction to Applied Youth Development 

Select six credits from the following: 

CJAllO Juvenile Delinquency 

CJA348 Juvenile Justice 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education 

SPE205 ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder 

PE134 Concepts of Physical Activity and Wellness 

PS Y22 1 Child and Adolescent Development OR 

PSY321 Developmental Science 

SOC305 Working with Children and Youth 

SOC345 Human Service Techniques 

WGS/SOC225 The Family 

Select six credits from the following: 

ART396 Art Education for Elementary Teachers 

ART397 Art in Recreation: Beyond Arts and Crafts 

ED307 Responding to Emergencies 

ED309 Principles of Athletic Coaching 

REC103 Leadership and Group Dynamics 

REC250 Special Events Management 

REC390 Meeting Children's Needs Through Movement 

REC393 Selected Topics in Community Recreation 

Criminal Justice (18 credits) 

CJ A 1 1 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

Five other courses in Criminal Justice, of which a minimum of nine credits 

must be at the 300/400 level. 

Criminalistics Minor (16 or 17 credits) 

CJAlOl Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CJA230/FCM200 Introduction to Criminalistics 

CJA305 Criminal Investigation*** 

CJA362/FCM362 Crime Scene Processing*** 

And one of the following: 

CJA323 Fire and Explosion Investigation*** 
CJA386 Death Investigation*** 
FCM410 Forensic Body Fluid Analysis* 

Gerontology Minor (18 credits) 

GER215 Social Aspects of Aging 
GER3 1 2 Psychological Aspects of Aging 



*There are three prerequisites for this course: CJA230/FCM200. BIO150. CHM134. 
***Course cannot be used for both Criminalistics minor and Criminal Justice elective. 



98 Programs of Study 



GER410 Clinical Aspects of Aging 
Any three of the following courses: 

ANT350 Anthropology of Aging 



BEH495,BEH496 

GER316 

GER320 

GER330 

GER390. GER391 , GER392 

GER498,GER499 



Behavioral Science Cooperative Internship" 
Ethical Aspects of Aging 
Working with Older Adults 
Death, Dying, and Bereavement 
Selected Topics in Gerontology 
Gerontology Independent Study 



Human Services Minor (18 credits) 

SOC240 Theory and Policy for the Human Services Professional 

SOC355 Program Design and Evaluation 

SOC415 Grant Writing for Nonprofit Agencies 

SOC345 Human Services Techniques 

REC 103 Leadership and Group Dynamics 

One of the following courses: 

SOC305 Working with Children and Youth 

GER320 Working with Older Adults 

C J A 1 1 Juvenile Delinquency (with permission of instructor) 

PS Y22 1 Child and Adolescent Development OR 

PSY321 Developmental Science 

Psychology Minor (18 credits) 

PS Y 1 00 General Psychology and 

from the following advanced Psychology courses: 



Select five courses 

PSY200 
PSY210 
PSY221 
PSY321 
PSY222 
PSY227 
PSY230 
PSY330 
PSY243 
PSY270 
PSY271 
PSY307 
PSY309 



Essential Skills and Tools 

Fundamentals of Biopsychology 

Child and Adolescent Development OR 

Developmental Science** 

Adult Development 

Psychology of Exceptional Children 

Abnormal Psychology OR 

Adult Psychopathology*** 

Social Psychology 

Design and Analysis I 

Design and Analysis II 

Cognitive Psychology 

Theories of Learning 



*Only special gerontology internships apply; see advisor six weeks prior to registration. 

**Students may take PSY22I or PSY32i but may not take both courses for credit in the Psychology minor. 

***Students may take PSY230 or PSY330 but may not take both courses for credit in the Psychology minor. 



Behavioral Sciences Department 99 



PSY310 Brain and Behavior 

PS Y3 1 2 Psychological Aspects of Aging 

PSY321 Developmental Science OR 

PS Y22 1 Child and Adolescent Development* 

PSY330 Adult Psychopathology OR 

PSY230 Abnormal Psychology** 

PSY331 Child Psychopathology 

PS Y35 1 Biological Bases of Behavior 

PSY354 Sensation and Perception 

PSY363 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

PSY365 Psychological Testing 

PSY370 Design and Analysis III 

PSY375-399 Special Topics 

PSY38 1 Adult Psychopathology and the Media 

PSY42 1-422 Psychology Internship 

PS Y43 1 -432 Teaching Practicum 

PSY440 Personality 

PSY441 Counseling Theories in Psychology 

PSY472 History and Systems in Psychology 

PSY498-499 Psychology Independent Study 

Note: To complete a minor in Psychology, a minimum of 12 credit hours must be 
completed at York College of Pennsylvania. 



Sociology Minor (18 credits) 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 
SOC220 American Social Problems 

One course selected from the following: 

SOC230 Development of Sociological Theory 
SOC235 Contemporary Sociological Theory 

Select three courses from the following: 



PSY243 
SOC201 
SOC210 
SOC225/WGS225 
SOC240 
SOC301 
SOC302 
SOC305 
SOC310 



Social Psychology 
Sociology of Family Violence 
Drug/Alcohol Addiction 
The Family 

Theory/Policy Human Services 
Environmental Sociology 
Sociology of Health and Illness 
Working with Children and Youth 
Sociology of Organizations 



*Students may take PS Y22 1 or PSY32 1 but may not take both courses for credit in the Psychology minor. 
**Students may take PSY230 or PSY330 but may not take both courses for credit in the Psychology minor. 



100 Programs of Study 



SOC315 
SOC320 
SOC330 
SOC340 
SOC345 
SOC355 
SOC360/WGS360 
SOC410 
SOC415 



Ethnic/Minorities 

Criminology 

Sociology of Religion 

Urban Sociology 

Human Services Techniques 

Program Design and Evaluation 

Gender and Society 

Population Trends 

Grant Writing for Nonprofit Agencies 



'p^^^ 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



The Department of Biological Sciences offers baccalaureate degree programs in 
«., Biology, Secondary Education-Biology, and the Allied Health fields of Nuclear 
Medicine Technology, Respiratory Care, and Healthcare Coding. The Biology 
program is broad-based, and designed to prepare students for graduate studies or for 
professional programs in a variety of fields, including medicine or other health-related 
career. Graduates may seek employment immediately in biology-related areas such as 
environmental science or biotechnology. The Secondary Education-Biology program 
prepares students for certification as secondary education biology teachers. The Allied 
Health programs are professionally accredited, and prepare students for careers as 
nuclear medicine technologists or respiratory therapists. The Department also offers 
associate degree programs in Biology, Respiratory Care, and Healthcare Coding. A 
Healthcare Coding Specialist certificate and a minor in Biology are also available. 

Allied Health Programs 

York College offers a number of programs for students interested in the health fields, 
and these majors are offered through different departments of the College. All these 
programs provide students with the training to obtain employment in their respective 
medical fields immediately upon graduation or, in some cases, following their 
completion of certification examinations required in certain specialties. Four-year 
baccalaureate programs include Respiratory Care and Nuclear Medicine Technology 
in the Biological Sciences Department, and Clinical Laboratory Science in the 
Physical Sciences Department. The Nursing Program is housed in its own department. 
Associate degree programs are offered through Biology in Respiratory Care and 
Healthcare Coding, as well as a certificate program in Healthcare Coding. Information 
concerning these programs can be found within each department. 

Students interested in health careers requiring postgraduate work (medicine, 
physical therapy, etc.) typically major in Biology or Chemistry and are advised by the 
Committee for the Health Professions of the College. Consult the respective departments 
and/or the Committee for the Health Professions at the College for more information. 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Biological Sciences 

The Biology Program provides the student with a solid and rigorous foundation in 
biology, emphasizing a balance between the molecular/cellular and organismal/ 
population areas of the field. Recognizing the many subspecialties in biology, the 
curriculum is also flexible, allowing the student to design an area of emphasis that 
matches their unique interests and goals. Students are given numerous opportunities 
to expand their writing and speaking abilities, not only through their laboratory and 
classroom experiences, but also in selected courses such as Introduction to Scientific 
Research and Senior Thesis. The Biology Program has a strong chemistry and physics 
component. Many Biology majors acquire a minor in Chemistry by taking one 
additional chemistry course, qualifying graduates for jobs that require skills in biology 
and chemistry. 

While mastery of subject matter is of prime importance, the curriculum also 
emphasizes the process of scientific inquiry through laboratory experimentation. Students 

101 



102 Programs of Study 



design and conduct experiments both within their courses and outside of the classroom. 
Students are encouraged either to participate in undergraduate research projects with 
York College faculty or to arrange a summer research experience with faculty at other 
institutions around the country. York College faculty offer a wide range of research 
opportunities for the student. Students, with their faculty mentors, may present their 
research findings at state and national scientific meetings. Papers have recently been 
presented by student-faculty teams in the areas of oncology, neurophysiology, exercise 
physiology, ornamental horticulture, plant development, animal behavior, microbial 
physiology and environmental microbiology. Additional research opportunities 
are available for students in molecular and cellular biology, genetics, toxicology, 
biochemistry, marine and terrestrial ecology, and reproductive physiology. 

Many students earn credit through an internship or independent study by working 
in a learning environment off-campus. Examples include biotechnology companies, 
local hospitals , environmental firms , nature centers , or pharmaceutical laboratories . The 
skills and attitudes acquired in the workplace not only enhance the educational process 
at the college, but also provide a potential place of employment after graduation. 

A college-wide Committee for the Health Professions exists on campus 
specifically to advise students interested in Medicine, Veterinary Science, Optometry, 
Physical Therapy, and other professional careers based in the sciences. There is no 
pre-professional major at the College since professional schools prefer that applicants 
major in a traditional undergraduate discipline, such as Biology or Chemistry, rather 
than follow a specific program geared to one profession, such as pre-med. The 
Committee forms a second tier of advisors for pre-professional students in addition 
to their major advisor. Committee members assist students in designing a course 
sequence and in choosing other related activities that will strengthen their professional 
school applications. They work closely with students from their freshman year until 
the application process is completed. 

In addition to supportive advising, students who wish to pursue clinical careers 
may also choose to participate in courses offered through the Department of Biological 
Sciences in collaboration with York Hospital. These courses permit students to gain 
first-hand experience in a clinical setting by allowing them to shadow physicians in 
various departments, take part in weekly hospital grand rounds, participate in clinical 
research, and pursue an advanced study of human anatomy and disease. 

The Department of Biological Sciences is a member of the Marine Science 
Consortium at Wallops Island, Virginia. This consortium of colleges in Pennsylvania 
was formed to provide a field station for students to study and conduct research in 
the marine sciences. The Marine Biology and Oceanography courses conduct their 
laboratory component at this site. York College students may also choose from a wide 
array of courses offered at the station during the summer. Biology majors may take 
these courses as upper-division electives for the major. Some courses are designed 
for non-science majors as well. The student must apply for credit to both the College 
and the Consortium in order to participate in these courses. Additional fees to the 
Consortium are required to cover food and lodging. A catalog describing the courses 
is available on the Consortium webpage. 



Department of Biological Sciences 103 



Requirements for Graduation: 



To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Biology must complete a minimum 
of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in all Biology 
courses, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students transferring into Biology must complete at least four Biology courses 
at York College in order to graduate as a Biology major. Acceptable courses are 
determined by the major advisor and the department chair. 

r/ie required courses for the Biological Sciences Major are: 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II 

PHYllO General Physics I 

PHY 112 General Physics II 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

CHM236 Organic Chemistry II** OR Biochemistry 

BEH260 Statistics OR MAT250 Statistics 

BIO150 Biology I 

BI0152 Biology II 

BIO200 Intro, to Scientific Research 

BIO240 Genetics 

BIO300 Ecology 

BIO400 Senior Thesis 

Upper-Division Biology Electives: 20 credits 

Students must choose one course from the cellular/subcellular category and one course 
from the organismal/population category of the upper-division biology electives. The 
remaining 12 required credits must also be chosen from these categories. 

Cellular/Subcellular 

BIO330 Biology of Microorganisms 

BIO350 Biochemistry I 

BI0352 Biochemistry II 

BI0354 Immunology . . 

BI0356 Reproduction and Developmental Biology 

BI0358 Cell and Molecular Biology 

Organismal/Population 

BIO302 Zoology 
BIO304 Botany 



**Many graduate programs in biological science and most medical-related post-baccalaureate programs require 
both Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. Check the requirements of those institutions and programs. 



104 Programs of Study 



BIO306 Animal Behavior 

BIO308 Animal Physiology 

BI03 1 Plant Morphology 

BI03 1 2 Plant Systematics 

BI0324 Marine Ecology of the Chesapeake Bay 

BIO370 Evolutionary Biology 

BI04 1 2 Adv. Seasonal Flora 



Students have the option of taking ONE course at the Wallops Island Marine Science 
Consortium (courses with YMS prefix), which will fulfill an organismal/population 
elective. 

Free Electives 17 credits (Science electives are recommended) 



Biology (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Information Literacy 

Academic Writing 

Physical Education 

Applied Calculus 

Biology I & II 

Human Communication 

General Chemistry I & II 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
8 
3 
_^ 
32 



Sophomore Year 

Area I Distribution Requirements 

Area II Distribution Requirements 

Free elective 

Genetics 

Introduction to Scientific Research 

Organic Chemistry I & II 
(or Organic Chemistry I and 
Biochemistry during junior year) 

Statistics 

Upper-Division Biology Elective 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
4 
3 



3 
34 



Junior Year Credits 

Area I Distribution Requirements 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 

Area V Distribution Requirements 

Ecology 



Department of Biological Sciences 105 

General Physics I & II 8 

Upper-Division Biology Elective 4 

sT 

Senior Year Credits 

3 Upper-Division Biology Electives 12 

Free electives 14 

Senior Thesis 1 

27 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology 

A Nuclear Medicine Technology major will prepare the student for a professional 
career as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Nuclear Medicine is a specialty area of 
medical practice that uses radioactive substances and sensitive instrumentation to help 
diagnose and treat certain diseases. This specialty is directed by a nuclear physician 
who receives added training, beyond medical school, in the proper use and handling 
of radioactive substances. The Nuclear Medicine Technologist is an individual v/ho 
receives training to perform the many patient procedures that will assist the nuclear 
physician in diagnosis and treatment. This individual is trained in the use of gamma 
cameras, uptake probes, and other specialized instrumentation to obtain information 
about virtually every major organ system of the body. Upon successful completion 
of the program and the registry examination for Nuclear Medicine Technology, the 
individual is certified as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. 

Students pursuing the bachelor of science degree in Nuclear Medicine Technology 
spend three years at York College followed by a clinical year at one of the affiliated 
hospitals* of the Lancaster General College of Nursing and Heahh Sciences. Admission 
to York College does not guarantee admission to the hospital clinical year. Students 
follow the prescribed courses of study for the first three years at the College. The 
student must earn a minimum of 2.0 in each of the required supporting courses with an 
average of 2.5 in science and mathematics as well as a cumulative grade point average 
of 3.0 or higher in order for the College to recommend the student for the clinical year. 
At the end of the fall semester of the junior year, the student applies for the clinical 
year through the Coordinator of Nuclear Medicine at York College. The Admissions 
Committee of the Lancaster General College of Nursing and Health Sciences decides 
which students can be accepted into the clinical year and also designates the hospital 
assignment. The student will then be required to complete the required number of 
shadowing hours at the assigned hospital. 

The clinical year begins in August and is 12 months in duration. Three days per 
week are devoted to clinical practice and one day per week is spent in classroom 



* Program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Nuclear Medicine Technology. The 
affiliated hospitals are Lancaster General Hospital, York Hospital. Memorial Hospital. Washington County 
Hospital. Reading Hospital and Medical Center. Good Samaritan Hospital of Lebanon, Levvistown Hospital 
Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Grand View Hospital, and Carlisle Regional Medical Center. 



106 Programs of Study 



instruction. This will involve commuting one day a week to Lancaster General College 
of Nursing and Health Sciences for classroom instruction and commuting to the 
affiliate hospital three days per week. 

Upon successful completion of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program, a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Nuclear Medicine from York College and a Certificate 
in Nuclear Medicine Technology from the Lancaster General College of Nursing 
and Health Sciences will be awarded. This qualifies the individual to take one of the 
national registry examinations** in order to become a Certified Nuclear Medicine 
Technologist. 

In addition, an individual with training from another field or another degree such 
as Clinical Laboratory Science, Nursing, Biology, etc., may apply for the clinical year 
as a student with advanced status. This individual would receive a certificate after 
successfully completing the Program and would also be eligible to take one of the 
national registry examinations for Certified Nuclear Medicine Technologists. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Nuclear Medicine Technology 
must complete a minimum of 129 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Nuclear Medicine Technology must earn a 
minimum grade of 2.0 in all major requirements with an average of 2.5 in science, 
math, and required major courses. 

Thie required courses for the Nuclear Medicine Teciinoiogy Major are: 



BIO150 


Biology I 


CHM134 


General Chemistry I 


CHM136 


General Chemistry II 


CHM234 


Organic Chemistry I 


BIO220 


Human Anatomy & Physiology I 


BI0222 


Human Anatomy & Physiology II 


BIO230 


Microbiology 


BI0354 


Immunology 


BIO350 


Biochemistry 


PHY112 


General Physics II 


HCC215 


Medical Terminology 


BEH260 


Statistics 


MAT 120 


Applied Calculus 


BIO 100 


Introduction to Allied Health 



Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB), and American Registry of Radiologic 
Technologists (ARRT). 



Department of Biological Sciences 107 



It is suggested that students take more than the required credits needed for graduation 
by taking: 

CHM338 Instrumental Analysis 
IFS105 Personal Productivity Computing 

Clinical Year: 30 Credits 

The fourth year of courses (30 credits) consists of a hospital practicum at one of the 
hospitals of the Lancaster General College of Nursing and Health Sciences. 

A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher is necessary in order for 
the College to recommend the student to the Advisory Committee of the Lancaster 
General College of Nursing and Health Sciences for the clinical year. The College 
cannot guarantee the student a position at a hospital for the clinical year. 

Nuclear Medicine Technology (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Biology I 4 

General Chemistry I and II 8 

Applied Calculus 3 

Medical Terminology 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Electives 6 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Allied Health 1 

36 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 2 

Organic Chemistry I 4 

Human Anatomy & Physiology 8 

Physics II 4 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Statistics 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements _3^ 

33 

Junior Year Credits 

Biochemistry 4 

Immunology 4 

Microbiology 4 

Area II Distribution Requirements 6 



108 Programs of Study 



Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Free Electives _6 

30 

Senior Year Credits 

(Clinical Practician) 

Nuclear Medicine Theory 14 

Nuclear Medicine Practicum 2^ 

30 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Respiratory Care 

This Respiratory Care Program (registry level) prepares the student for a professional 
career as a respiratory therapist. Respiratory Care is an allied health specialty 
instrumental in the diagnosis, treatment, management, and preventive care of patients 
with cardiopulmonary problems. Respiratory Care offers persons interested in caring 
for others an opportunity to serve as vital members of the health care team. 

Applicants to the Respiratory Care programs must have graduated from high 
school or have earned a state equivalency diploma and must exhibit evidence of a strong 
background in a college preparatory program. A minimum "C" average is required 
in high school biology, chemistry, and algebra. Applicants must tour a Respiratory 
Care department. Applicants may be asked to attend an interview with the Respiratory 
Care Program Director, Clinical Coordinator, or Medical Director. Size of the classes 
is limited. Transfer students will be considered for admission to the Program on an 
individual basis. 

Respiratory Care students should be prepared for expenses in addition to those 
identified as tuition, fees, and room and board costs. Most additional expenses relate 
to costs for uniforms, supplies such as a stethoscope, medical insurance, textbooks, 
membership in professional organizations, and other supplies. 

Classroom, laboratory, and clinical facilities at the York Hospital will be utilized 
for the Respiratory Care courses. Students will also receive clinical education at 
secondary clinical affiliates. Students will be responsible for their own transportation 
to and from Respiratory Care classes, laboratories, and clinical experience. 

To remain in and progress through the Respiratory Care major, a 2.0 or higher 
must be obtained in each respiratory (RT#) course. In addition, the student must carry a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or greater. A student who receives less than a 2.0 
in any Respiratory course will be permitted to repeat the course only one time. Since 
course sequencing is essential, a failed course will necessitate the student stepping out 
of the Program until the course is offered again the following year. All students who 
interrupt the suggested progression of courses for any reason must submit a letter of 
intent to the Respiratory Care Program Director at least two months prior to the start 
of the semester for which they desire reinstatement. Reinstatement into the Program 
is not guaranteed and will be evaluated on an individual basics as space is available. 
An interview with the Program staff and testing of base knowledge will be required to 
determine which courses will need to be repeated, possibly including some that were 



Department of Biological Sciences 109 

already passed. A student may not fail more than one Respiratory course. A second 
failure will result in dismissal from the Program. 

Successful completion of the two year Respiratory Therapist Program qualifies the 
individual to take the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) examination administered 
by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). Successful completion of the 
three- or four-year Respiratory Therapist Program qualifies the individual to take the 
CRT and Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) examinations administered by the 
NBRC. 8310 Nieman Rd.. Lenexa. KS 66214. Phone: (913) 599-4200. www.nbrc.org. 

The clinical courses in Respiratory Care may not be scheduled according to 
conventional semester scheduling and may include clinical scheduling during evenings 
and nights. 

All Respiratory Therapy Programs are fully accredited by the Commission 
on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). 1361 Park St.. 
Clearwater. PL 33756. Phone: (727) 210-2350. www.caahep.org. They are also 
accredited by the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), 1248 
Harwood Rd.. Bedford. TX 76021. Phone: (817) 283-2835. www.coarc.com. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Respiratory Care must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not 
be taken on a pass/fail basis. A 2.0 or higher grade must be attained earned in each 
Respiratory Care course. 

In addition, students majoring in Respiratory Care must maintain a 2.0 average in all 
major requirements. 

The required courses for the Respiratory Care IVIajor are: 

General 

BIO150 Biology I 

BIO220 Human Anatomy & Physiology 

BI0222 Human Anatomy & Physiology 

BIO230 Microbiology 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 

CHM 136 General Chemistry II 

PHY 110 General Physics I 

Respiratory Care Required Courses 

RTIOO Basic Science for Resp. Ther. 

RT105 Medical Technology 

RT 1 1 Oxygen Therapy & CPR 

RT 1 1 5 Bronchopulmonary Hygiene 



110 Programs of Study 



RT120 


Mechanical Ventilation 


RT125 


Pulmonary Funct. Testing 


RT130 


Pulmonary Disease 


RT135 


Pediatric Resp. Therapy 


RT210 


Eval . Patient Pulmonary Dis 


RT320 


Pulmonary Physiology 


RT330 


Cardiac Physiology 


RT410 


Independent Study 


RT450 


Resp. Therapy Seminar 


Clinical Courses* 




RT150 


Clinical Prac. I 


RT160 


ClinicalPrac.il 


RT225 


Clinical Prac. IV 


RT260 


Clinical Prac. V 


RT270 


Clinical Prac. VI 


RT350 


Clinical Prac. VIII 


RT415 


Clinical Prac. IX 


RT420 


Clinical Prac. X 



Respiratory Care (suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year (Fall) 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 


Credits 
3 
3 


General Chemistry I 

Area I Distribution Requirement 

Physical Education 


4 
3 

1 
14 


Freshman Year (Spring) 
Academic Writing ' 


Credits 
3 


Human Communication 


3 


Information Literacy 
General Chemistry II 
Medical Terminology 


2 
4 
1 


Physical Education 


1 
14 


Summer 


Credits 


Basic Science for Respiratory Care (10 weeks) 
Biology I 


3 
4 
7 



*RT280 Clinical Practice VII may be substituted for RT350, RT415, and RT420. 



Department of Biological Sciences 111 



Sophomore Year (Fall)** Credits 

Anatomy and Physiology I 4 

Pulmonary Diseases 3 

Bronchopulmonary Hygiene 3 

Oxygen Therapy and CPR 3 

Clinical Practice I _1 

14 

Sophomore Year (Spring) Credits 

Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

Pulmonary Function Testing 2 

Mechanical Ventilation 4 

Pediatric Respiratory Care 2 

Clinical Practice II _2 

14 

(Summer) Credits 

Patient Evaluation (10 weeks) 2 

Clinical Practice IV (10 weeks) 1 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 



Junior Year (Fall) Credits 

General Physics I 4 

Pulmonary Physiology 3 

Clinical Practice V 1 

Area IV Distribution Requirement , 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement _3 

14 

Junior Year (Spring) Credits 

Microbiology . - 4 

Cardiac Physiology 2 

Clinical Practice VI 1 

Free Electives ' _6 

13 

(Summer) ,,,, ;. .. ,.. , , Credits 

Clinical Practice VIII (5 weeks) ^ j_ 

, 1 

Senior Year (Fall) Credits 

Respiratory Therapy Seminar 2 

Clinical Practice IX 1 



**For progression to the sophomore year of the Respiratory Care Program, students must have an earned grade 
point average of 2.50 or higher and a minimum of 2.0 in each freshman course. 



112 Programs of Study 



Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Electives 4 

13 

Senior Year (Spring) Credits 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Electives 6 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Independent Study for Respiratory Care 1 

Clinical Practice X 1 

14 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education-Biology 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-Biology must 
complete all requirements including a minimum of 139 credits, achieve cumulative 
grade point average of 3 .0 or higher, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher 
in each of the following five Common Core courses— two English courses (WRT102, 
WRT202), the Human Communications course, and two math courses (specific course 
names are specified on the appropriate Education worksheet). 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-Biology: 

Discipline Certification Requirements- 



MAT250 


Statistics 


CHM134 


General Chemistry I 


CHM136 


General Chemistry II 


CHM234 


Organic Chemistry 


CHM236 


Organic Chemistry OR 


BIO350 


Biochemistry 


PHY 110 


General Physics I 


ESS152 


Earth & Space Science 


gy Required 


Courses- 


BIO 150 


Biology I' 


BI0152 


Biology ir 


BIO200 


Introduction to Scientific Research 


BIO240 


Genetics 


BIO300 


Ecology 


BIO330 


Biology of Microorganisms 


BIO400 


Senior Thesis 


BIO 


Biology Elective 



Department of Biological Sciences 113 



Pre-Professional Education Courses- 



ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

PS Y 100 General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses- 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education^ 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE35 1 Teaching Strategies 

SE354 Teaching Science 

SE360 ReadingAVriting across the Curriculum 

SE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience-^ 

Student Teaching Semester-"* 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies OR 

SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

-Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

'SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

■•Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

'Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

Secondary Education-Biology (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing , ■ , 3 

Applied Calculus • , : 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Sociology . ^ . 3 

Biology I and 11 8 

.- ; : General Chemistry I and II ^ 8 

Area V Distribution Requirement '■"-' _3 

.-..-:, •=,,' .,..., .' ,^. '■ . .. ■■ . ... ,,:■ 36 

Sophomore Year ' - - Credits 

Introduction to Scientific Research 3 

Genetics 4 

Physical Education 2 
Organic Chemistry I and II 

(or Organic Chemistry I and Biochemistry) 8 

Introduction to American Education 3 



114 Programs of Study 



General Psychology 


3 


Area I Distribution Requirements 


6 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Instructional Technology 


3 




35 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Ecology 


4 


Biology of Microorganisms 


4 


General Physics I and Earth/Space Science 


7 


Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 


3 


Statistics 


3 


Secondary School Experience 


"^3 


Teaching Strategies 


3 


Free Elective 


6 


Teaching General Science 


3 




36 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Senior Thesis 


1 


Biology Elective 


4 


Community and Legal Issues in Education* 


3 


Free Electives 


6 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 
ReadingAVriting across Curriculum 


6 

1 



Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 

Practicum in Student Teaching SE412 1 

Selected Topics SE4 13 1 

Student Assistance Seminar SE310 (1 credit elective) 

Student Teaching SE404 OR 10 

Focused Studies SE405 

34 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Two Respiratory Therapy Associate Degree programs are offered in 
Cooperation with York Hospital 

The advanced (registry level) Respiratory Therapist program is three years in length. 
Graduates receive an associate degree. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Respiratory Therapy must complete 
a minimum of 99 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not 



Department of Biological Sciences 115 



be taken on a pass/fail basis. A 2.0 or higher grade must be attained earned in each 
Respiratory course. 

In addition, students majoring in Respiratory Therapy must maintain a 2.0 average 
in all major requirements. 

The required courses for the Respiratory Therapist Associate degree are: 

General 



BIO150 


Biology I 


BIO220 


Human Anatomy & Physiology 


BI0222 


Human Anatomy & Physiology 


BIO230 


Microbiology 


CHM134 


General Chemistry I 


CHM136 


General Chemistry II 


PHYllO 


General Physics I 


Respiratory Care Required Courses 


RTIOO 


Basic Science for Resp. Ther. 


RT105 


Medical Terminology 


RTllO 


Oxygen Therapy & CPR 


RT115 


Bronchopulmonary Hygiene 


RT120 


Mechanical Ventilation 


RT125 


Pulmonary Funct. Testing 


RT130 


Pulmonary Disease 


RT135 


Pediatric Resp. Therapy 


RT210 


Eval. Patient Pulmonary Disease 


RT320 


Pulmonary Physiology 


RT330 


Cardiac Physiology 


Clinical Courses* 




RT150 


Clinical Prac. I ' 


RT160 


Clinical Prac. II 


RT255 


Clinical Prac. IV 


RT260 


Clinical Prac. V 


RT270 


Clinical Prac. VI 


RT280 


Clinical Prac. VII 



Respiratory Therapist (three-year) Associate Degree (suggested course 
sequence) 



Freshman Yea?- (Fall) 
Analytical Reading and Writing 
Critical Thinking/Prob. Solv. Math 
General Chemistry I 
Area I Distribution Requirement 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 



*RT250 Clinical Practice III may be substituted for RT255 and RT260. 



116 Programs of Study 



Physical Education 


1 
14 


Freshman Year (Spring) 
Academic Writing 
Human Communication 
Information Literacy 
General Chemistry II 
Medical Terminology 
Physical Education 


Credits 
3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 
14 


Summer 

Basic Science for Respiratory Care (10 weeks) 

Biology I 


Credits 
3 
4 
7 


Sophomore Year (Fall) 
Anatomy and Physiology I 
Pulmonary Disease 
Bronchopulmonary Hygiene 
Oxygen Therapy and CPR 
Clinical Practice I 


Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
14 


Sophomore Year (Spring) 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
Pulmonary Function Testing 
Mechanical Ventilation 
Pediatric Respiratory Care 
Clinical Practice II 


Credits 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
14 


Summer 

Patient Evaluation (10 weeks) 
Clinical Practice IV (10 weeks) 
Area II Distribution Requirement 


Credits 
2 
1 
3 
6 


Junior Year (Fall) 

General Physics I 

Pulmonary Physiology 

Clinical Practice V 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 

Area V Distribution Requirement 


Credits 
4 
3 
1 
3 
3 
14 



Department of Biological Sciences 117 



Junior Year (Spring) Credits 

Microbiology 4 

Cardiac Physiology 2 

Clinical Practice VI 1 

Free Electives 6 

13 

Summer Credits 

Clinical Practice VII ( 10 weeks) 3 

3 

The entry level (certification level) Respiratory Therapist Associate 
Degree in cooperation with York Hospital (Prior Technician Program) 

This Respiratory Therapist Program is two years in length. Graduates of the Program 
receive an associate degree. A Certified Respiratory Therapist delivers services such as 
administration of medications and humidity, providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 
training patients in self-care skills, administration of oxygen, testing of lung functions, 
and helping patients breathe with the use of ventilators. 

Students completing this program are qualified to take the Certified Respiratory 
Therapist (CRT) examination administered by the National Board for Respiratory 
Care (NBRC). 

Requirements for Certification: 

To be eligible for certification students must complete a minimum of 74 credits. 
In addition, students must maintain a 2.0 average in all major requirements, earn a 
cumulative GPA of 2.0, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete 
the General Education Requirements of the College. A 2.0 or higher grade must be 
attained earned in each Respiratory course. 

The required courses for the two-year Respiratory Therapist Associate 
Degree are: 

General 

BIO150 Biology I 

BIO220 Human Anatomy & Physiology 

BI0222 Human Anatomy & Physiology 

Respiratory Care Required Courses 

RTIOO Basic Science for Resp. Then 

RT105 Medical Terminology 

RTllO Oxygen Therapy & CPR 

RT115 Bronchopulmonary Hygiene 

RT120 Mechanical Ventilation 

RT125 Pulmonary Funct. Testing 



118 Programs of Study 



RT130 


Pulmonary Disease 


RT135 


Pediatric Resp. Therapy 


Clinical Courses 




;, RT150 


Clinical Prac. I 


: RT160 


ClinicalPrac.il 


RT250 


Clinical Prac. Ill 



Respiratory Therapist (two-year) Associate Degree 
(suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year (Fall) 


Credits 


Analytical Reading and Writing 


3 


Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Physical Education 


1 


Biology I 


4 




14 


Freshman Year (Spring) 


Credits 


Academic Writing 


3 


Human Communication 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 


Area II Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 


Medical Terminology 


1 
15 


Summer 


Credits 


Basic Science for Respiratory Care (10 weeks) 


3 


Area I Distribution Requirement 


3 


Physical Education, 


1 


Free Elective 


3 




10 


Sophomore Year (Fall) 


Credits 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


4 


Pulmonary Disease 


3 


Bronchopulmonary Hygiene 
Oxygen Therapy and CPR 


3 

3 



Clinical Practice I _}_ 

14 

Sophomore Year (Spring) Credits 

Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

Pulmonary Function Testing 2 



Department of Biological Sciences 119 



Mechanical Ventilation 
Pediatric Respiratory Care 
Clinical Practice II 



Summer 

Clinical Practice III (13 weeks) 

Free Elective 



4 

2 

_2 

14 

Credits 
4 
3 
7 



The required courses for Biological Sciences Associate Degree are: 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II 

BIO150 Biology I 

- BI0152 Biology II 

BIO240 Genetics 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

Two Biology electives at the 200 level or above 

Biology Associate Degree (suggested course sequence) 



Freshmen Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

Applied Calculus 

Biology I & II 

General Chemistry I & II 

Human Communication 

Area I Distribution Requirement 



Sophomore Year 

Information Literacy 

Genetics 

Organic Chemistry 

Area II Distribution Requirement 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 

Area V Distribution Requirement 

Biology Electives 

Physical Education 

Free Electives 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



3 
_3 
31 

Credits 
2 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
8 
2 
_6 
35 



120 Programs of Study 



Associate Degree in Healthcare Coding 

The associate of science degree in Healtlicare Coding prepares students to be 
employed in hospitals, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, insurance companies, 
and other settings where diagnostic and procedural data are coded for reimbursement 
purposes. The Healthcare Coding curriculum combines an understanding of medical 
terminology, human anatomy, and disease processes with healthcare reimbursement 
and ICD-9-CM. CPT, and HCPCS coding principles. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students must complete a minimum of 62 credits. In 
addition, students must earn a 2.0 grade in all Healthcare Coding required courses, earn 
a cumulative GPA of 2.0, satisfy the College's residence requirements, and complete 
the General Education Requirements of the College for associate degree programs. 

The required courses for the Healthcare Coding Associate Degree are: 

BIO 106 Introduction to Body Structure and Function 

HCC2 1 5 Medical Terminology 

HCC220 HCPCS Coding 

HCC221 CPT Coding 

HCC222 Health Classifications and Reimbursement Systems (ICD-9-CM) 

HCC225 Healthcare Insurance Reimbursement 

HCC230 Concepts in Pharmacology 

HCC235 Pathophysiology 

HCC240 Coding Practicum 

Healthcare Coding Associate Degree (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Body Structure and Function 3 

Medical Terminology 3 

HCPCS Coding 1 

Healthcare Insurance Reimbursement 3 

Coding Practicum 3 

Pathophysiology 4 

Health Classifications (ICD-9-CM) 3 

Concepts in Pharmacology 1 

CPTCoding _1 

30 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

Personal Computing 3 



Department of Biological Sciences 121 

Physical Education 2 

Human Communication 3 

Area I: Arts & Humanities 3 

Area II: Social & Behavioral Science 3 

Area III: Laboratory Science 3-4 

Area IV: American Civilization 3 

Area V: Foreign Language/Intercultural Studies 3 

Free Elective 6 

32-33 

Non-degree Healthcare Coding Specialist (30 credits) 

The Healthcare Coding Specialist Program is designed to allow students to complete 
a minimum of 30 credits of required courses in healthcare coding and reimbursement 
and be awarded a Healthcare Coding Specialist certificate. Students completing this 
certificate program are eligible to apply for the associate of science degree program in 
Healthcare Coding. 

Requirements for Specialist: 

To be eligible for the Healthcare Coding Specialist certificate, the student must complete 
a minimum of 30 credits. In addition, students must earn a minimum 2.0 grade in all 
Healthcare Coding required courses and earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. 

The required courses for the Healthcare Coding Specialist are: 

BIO 106 Introduction to Body Structure and Function 

HCC2 1 5 Medical Terminology 

HCC220 HCPCS Coding 

HCC221 CPT Coding 

HCC222 Health Classifications and Reimbursement Systems (ICD-9-CM) 

HCC225 Healthcare Insurance Reimbursement 

HCC230 Concepts in Pharmacology 

HCC235 Pathophysiology 

HCC240 Coding Practicum 

Healthcare Coding Specialist (suggested course sequence) 

First Semester Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Body Structure and Function 3 

Medical Terminology _3 

14 



122 Programs of Study 



Second Semester Credits 

HCPCS Coding 1 

Healthcare Insurance Reimbursement 3 

Coding Practicum 3 

Pathophysiology 4 

Health Classifications (ICD-9-CM) 3 

Concepts in Pharmacology 1 

CPT Coding J_ 

16 

DEPARTMENTAL MINOR 
Minor in Biology 

Requirements for the minor (17-20 credits): 

BIO 150 Biology I 
BIO 152 Biology II 
Plus three additional Biology lab courses, 200 level or greater 






DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



"^"^he mission of York College's Department of Business Administration is to establish 
i and deliver distinctive, high-quality academic programs, facilitate linkages 
between academic and business communities, and to encourage ongoing scholarship. 
The Department's main purpose is to facilitate student learning and prepare students/ 
graduates at the associate, baccalaureate, and graduate levels to best meet their goals 
and the needs of the business community. 

To accomplish this mission, the Department offers a diverse array of majors 
that are linked together by the Common Professional Component (CPC). The 
CPC describes the competencies and experiences that are necessary for successful 
performance in the complex, global, and flexible workplace of the 21st century. 
All business students take courses in Accounting, Economics. Finance, Information 
Systems, Management, Marketing, Operations Management, and Statistics. The 
CPC also includes a capstone course designed to integrate all areas of a student's 
learning into a business strategy, policy making, and analysis framework. The 
Common Professional Component provides a solid base for specialized courses in 
each major, and provides opportunities for students to interact with members of the 
business community. 

York College of Pennsylvania , through its Department of Business Administration , 
is nationally accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and 
Programs to offer the following business degrees: 

• The Master of Business Administration Degree (MBA) 

• The Bachelor of Science Degree (BS) with majors in Accounting, Business 
Administration, Computer Information Systems, Economics, Engineering 
Management, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Management, and Marketing 

• The Associate of Science Degree (AS) with a major in Business Administration 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 

The York College MBA is designed to meet the needs of both practicing and potential 
managers. Coursework in the MBA Program integrates theory with practice and offers 
participants the opportunity to develop their personal managerial skills along with 
their knowledge base. Course methods are purposefully varied between lecture, case 
analysis, presentations, outside research, and group work. MBA courses incorporate 
the advantages of both the conventional and virtual classrooms. This multiple 
method approach emphasizes organizational diagnosis, analysis, and decision- 
making processes. The York College MBA considers both manufacturing and service 
enterprises and, as such, is beneficial to students with a wide variety of undergraduate 
and career experiences. 

The MBA curriculum is based on a lO-course core covering the fundamental 
areas of business administration and allows students to choose a concentration in one 
of the following areas: Accounting, Finance, General Business, Human Resource 
Management, Management, or Marketing. To earn an MBA, students must successfully 
complete the 10 core courses and three courses in the concentration area for a total 
of 39 graduate credit hours. Students who do not have a thorough background in a 

123 



124 Programs of Study 



business-related field will be required to complete additional courses as foundation 
courses to the MBA courses. 

Admission requirements and detailed program information are available in the 
Graduate Studies Catalog. Catalogs can be obtained from the MBA Office, Department 
of Business, or the Evening Resource Center in Campbell Hall. Information about the 
MBA Program is also available by visiting www.ycp.edu/mba. 

Baccalaureate/MBA Dual Degree Program 

The Dual Degree Program is designed to provide high-achieving undergraduate 
students with the opportunity to begin their graduate studies while in the senior year 
of undergraduate coursework. Dual Degree students are permitted to take up to nine 
credits of graduate coursework and apply those credits to the baccalaureate degree, 
generally as free electives. Those nine credits also count again toward fulfilling the 
MBA degree requirements. 

Admission to the Dual Degree Program is open to eligible students in any 
undergraduate discipline. Pursuing the MBA is an excellent opportunity for students 
in many of the baccalaureate programs offered at York College. Current Dual Degree 
students come from diverse fields such as art, communications, engineering, and 
music. Undergraduates interested in the Dual Degree Program should talk with their 
advisor and plan a program of study to facilitate admission into the MBA Program. 
Detailed information about the Dual Degree Program and its admission requirements 
can be found in the Graduate Studies Catalog or at www.ycp.edu/mba. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Baccalaureate degree programs are available in Accounting, Business Administration, 
Computer Information Systems, Economics, Engineering Management, 
Entrepreneurship, Finance, Management, and Marketing. Minors may also be earned 
in many of these programs. An associate degree program is offered in Business 
Administration. 

Normally, a student will take a minimum of 24 semester credits in the major 
component subject area for a baccalaureate degree (15-18 credits are required for 
a minor). The associate degree in Business Administration requires a student to 
complete a program of 33 credits in business. Each major program also requires the 
completion of General Business Component courses. In some cases these departmental 
requirements also serve to fulfill the General Education Requirements of the College. 
Each student should consult with the assigned faculty advisor every semester and 
review the program requirements and progress toward graduation. 

Business Department Policies 

• Enrollment in 300-400 level Business courses is restricted to students of 
at least junior status unless specifically exempted by the requirements in a 
particular program or the instructor of the course. All required 100-200 level 
courses in the College Common Core and General Business Component 
must be completed before enrolling in 300-400 level Business courses unless 



Department of Business Administration 125 



specifically exempted by the faculty advisor. 

• Courses that serve as prerequisites to subsequent Business courses must 
be completed with a grade of 2.0 or higher. If a student is not successful 
in attaining a 2.0 in a prerequisite course, the course may be repeated an 
additional two times (maximum 3 attempts). Withdrawing from a course 
during the normal withdrawal period will not be counted as an unsuccessful 
attempt. Students receiving lower than a 2.0 in any prerequisite course should 
consult with their advisor. Because many of the upper-level Business courses 
require prerequisites, failure to attain a 2.0 or higher on the first attempt of a 
prerequisite course may delay the intended date of graduation. If a student is 
unsuccessful in attaining a 2.0 in a prerequisite course after three attempts, a 
change in major may be necessary. 

• Credits transferred from a two-year institution will normally not be accepted 
as satisfying 300-400 level Business course requirements unless verification of 
competency is achieved. This verification, as determined by the chair, advisor 
or program coordinator, may require satisfactory completion (a 2.0) or higher 
in a higher-level course in the same or similar area or Credit By Examination. 
Transfer students need to complete a "Transfer Evaluation Form" in order to 
have 300-400 level credits considered for transfer. These forms are available 
in the Business Department Office. For transfer students, at least four 300- 
400 major subject area component courses, as determined by the advisor or 
program coordinator, must be completed at York College. 

• The Department of Business Administration believes in the integration of writing 
and communication skills throughout the business student's curriculum. Each 
baccalaureate degree business major is required to take writing/communications- 
focused courses during the sophomore (200 level), junior (300 level), and 
senior (400 level) years as partial fulfillment of graduation requirements. The 

: sophomore-level courses will include two case studies, an organizational 

analysis report (library research) , and oral presentation . The junior-level courses 

; : will require writing assignments geared to descriptive or technical writing. 
Descriptions of a business process or a business transaction are examples of this 
type of writing. In addition, case studies and oral presentations may be included. 
The senior-level courses require writing assignments of the type that a student 
with a particular major is likely to do after graduation as well as a major research 
project and presentation. 

To earn a degree, students must meet the following criteria: 

• All Business students must establish Information Technology (IT) competency 
by passing IFSIOO IT Competency Exam or IFS105 Personal Productivity 
Computing within the first 30 credits completed at York College. Students 
who do not receive a passing grade on the competency exam must complete 
IFS105 Personal Productivity Computing as part of their requirements for 
graduation. In some cases, adding IFS105 to the curriculum will increase the 
minimum number of credits required for graduation. Information technology 
competency for transfer students will be evaluated on an individual basis. 



126 Programs of Study 



• Satisfactorily complete all General Education Requirements of the College 

• Earn a 2.0 or higher in all courses that are prerequisite to any Business course 

• Earn a cumulative 2.0 average in all General Business Core courses 

• Earn a cumulative 2.0 average in the major component courses 

• Earn a cumulative 2.0 average in all courses taken at York College 

• Satisfy the College's residency requirements 

• Satisfactorily complete communication-focused courses in business at the 
sophomore, junior, and senior levels 

• Take a comprehensive examination in business as part of the Business Strategy 
(BUS495) course in the senior year. Students must earn a grade of 2.0 or 
higher in their major's senior capstone course— BUS495 or ENT495. 

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Accounting 

The Accounting Major provides the academic background for students considering 
accounting as a career field. The knowledge, skills, and techniques learned are used by 
our graduates working for CPA firms, private industry, and not-for-profit organizations. 
In addition to taking a full range of courses in financial accounting, all accounting 
students are also exposed to introductory-level courses in managerial accounting and 
taxation. Students may select advanced level courses in these topics as electives. As 
a result of the evolving nature of the accounting profession, the Accounting Program 
undergoes a constant review so that a balance of general business and advanced 
training in accounting is received by the student. 

Students with the goal of attaining the CPA license should be aware that in some 
states regulations have been passed that require successful completion of 150 credit 
hours prior to receiving permission to take the CPA exam. York College has two 
options for students who will be living in states that require 150 credit hours: 1) obtain 
a double major at the undergraduate level; or 2) obtain a BS/MBA through the Dual 
Degree Program. Students should research their home state's requirements and discuss 
them with their advisor, so that the curriculum is planned accordingly. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Accounting must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete the General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 
Students majoring in Accounting must maintain a 2.0 average in the General 
Business Component Courses, a 2.0 average in the Accounting Component Courses, 
and successfully complete IPS 100 or IPS 105 within the first 30 credits at the College. 
In addition, students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a 
prerequisite to a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section 
of this catalog for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses 
may lengthen the time to graduation. Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or higher 
in the senior business capstone course (BUS495). Students graduating with a declared 
major in Accounting may not simultaneously declare a minor in Accounting. 



Department of Business Administration 127 



The required courses for the Accounting Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 



MAT 120 


Applied Calculus* 


MKTIOO 


Principles of Marketing 


MGT150 


Principles of Management** 


ECO200 


Principles of Economics-Macro* 


ECO201 


Principles of Economics-Micro* 


ACC220 


Financial Accounting 


ACC225 


Managerial Accounting 


MGT220 


Human Resource Management 




OR 


OBD225 


Organizational Behavior 


QBA260 


Business Statistics I 


FIN300 


Managerial Finance I 


IFS305 


Management Information Systems 


QBA265 


Business Statistics II OR 


QBA310 


Management Science 


BUS345 


Business Law I 


MGT350 


Operations Management 


BUS495 


Business Strategy and Policy** 



International Business Elective 

Accounting Component Courses 

• ACC305 Taxation I 

ACC320 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACC325 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACC330 Intermediate Accounting III 

BUS346 Business Law II 

ACC4I0 Auditing** 

ACC420 Advanced Accounting 

Two of the following: , 

ACC315 Introduction to Financial Fraud 

ACC375 Advanced Managerial Accounting ' 

ACC395 Taxation II oy. , 

IBS415 International Accounting > 

ACC425 Special Topics in Accounting 

Required Electives-12 credits (These elective credits must be taken outside of the 
Department of Business Administration.) 



*Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



128 Programs of Study 



Accounting (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 
IT Competency Exam OR 

Personal Productivity Computing 0-3 

Applied Calculus 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Human Communication 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Financial Accounting 3 

32-36 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Business Statistics I 3 

Management Science OR Business Statistics II 3 

Principles of Economics 6 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Human Resource Management or Organizational Behavior 3 

Intermediate Accounting I 3 

30-31 

Junior Year Credits 

Taxation I 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Business Law I and II 6 

Managerial Finance I 3 

Intermediate Accounting II and III 6 

Management Info. Systems 3 

Accounting Elective 3 

Operations Management 3 

Physical Education _2 

32 

Senior Year Credits 

Advanced Accounting 3 

Auditing 3 

Business Policy 3 

Accounting Elective 3 



Department of Business Administration 129 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Required Electives 12 

International Business Elective 3 

30 

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Business Administration 

A major in Business Administration provides a broad-based education in all business 
disciplines but with sufficient depth that students engage in higher-level learning in 
key disciplines . This major provides the education required for "generalist" managerial 
positions. These are managers who understand how an organization functions, 
how it relates to its external environment and how people within the organization 
behave. Management generalists are not tied to a particular functional area, which 
means they can occupy a wide range of positions within an organization in a wide 
array of organizations in business, government, and the non-profit sector. A degree 
in Business Administration is also beneficial to students who want to own/operate a 
small business, enter corporate management training programs, or perform analytical 
work and projects within an organization. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Business Administration must 
complete a minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or 
higher, and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used 
to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Business Administration must maintain a 2.0 average in the 
General Business Component Courses and successfully complete IFSIOO or IPS 105 
within the first 30 credits at the College. In addition, students must attain a 2.0 or 
higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to a subsequent Business course. 
(Refer to the course description section of this catalog for specific prerequisites.) 
Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen the time to graduation. 
Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in the senior business capstone course 
(BUS495). Students graduating with a declared major in Business Administration may 
not simultaneously declare a Business Administration minor. 

The required courses for the Business Administration Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MATI20 Applied Calculus* 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management** 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro* 

ECO20 1 Principles of Economics-Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 



*Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

**Course is desianated as a vvriting/communications-intensive course. 



130 Programs of Study 



OBD280 Leadership and Change 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

QBA265 Business Statistics II OR 

QBA310 Management Science 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 

BUS495 Business Strategy and Policy** 

International Business Elective (choose one) 

IBS370 International Marketing 

IBS375 International Management 

IBS400 International Economics 

IBS405 International Finance 



Additional Business Electives (21 credits) 

Students must select at least one course and no more than two courses from each 
discipline area. Students must also complete at least six credits of 400-level courses 
(including the International Business elective). Internships and independent studies 
may be approved as additional elective choices but will not count toward the six credits 
of 400-level coursework. 



Accounting 

ACC305 
ACC315 
ACC320 

ACC375 

Economics 

ECO360 
ECO350 
ECO390 

Finance 

FIN320 
FIN330 
FIN340 

Management 

OBD225 
MGT220 

MGT445 
MGT460 



Taxation I 

Introduction to Financial Fraud 
Intermediate Accounting I 
Advanced Managerial Accounting 



Intermediate Macroeconomics 
Intermediate Microeconomics 
Managerial Economics 



Investments 
Risk Management 
Financial Institutions 



Organizational Behavior 
Human Resource Management 
Ethical Leadership 
Advanced Operations Management 



*Course is designated as a vvriting/communications-intensive course. 



Department of Business Administration 131 



Marketing 

MKT335 

MKT350 
MKT380 



New Product Planning 
Business Marketing 
Sales Manasement 



MKT410 Marketing Ethics 

Required Electives 16-18 credits (Twelve of these elective credits must be taken 
outside of the Department of Business Administration. The remaining electives may 
be used to complete a minor.) 



Business Administration (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

IT Competency Exam OR 

Personal Productivity Computing 

Applied Calculus 

Principles of Management 

Principles of Marketing 

Area III Distribution Requirement 

Area I Distribution Requirements 

Area V Distribution Requirement 

Information Literacy 

Human Communication 



Credits 
3 
3 

0-3 
3 
3 
3 

3-4 
6 
3 
2 

3 

32-36 



Sophomore Year 

Financial Accounting 

Managerial Accounting 

Principles of Economics • 

Leadership and Change 

Statistics 

Management Science OR Business Statistics II 

Physical Education 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 

Required Electives 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
6 

31 



Junior Year 
Managerial Finance I 
Management Information Systems 
Business Law I 
Operations Management 
Business Electives 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 



132 Programs of Study 



International Business Elective 3 

Required Electives 6 

Physical Education ^ 

31 

Senior Year Credits 

Business Strategy and Policy 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Business Electives 12 

Required Electives 9 

30-31 

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major In Computer Information 
Systems 

All organizations and businesses, whether they are government or non-government, 
for profit or not-for-profit, large or small, local or global, utilize information systems 
and information technologies. These information systems are often large, expensive, 
highly integrated, very complex, and essential to both the daily operations and long- 
term strategy of the organizations that employ them. These organizations require a 
highly specialized staff of technologists that can bridge the gap between organizational 
needs and computerized technologies. These socio-technologists must understand not 
only the technology but also the environment into which it is being integrated. 

Whatever the environment may be — globalized networking, finance, marketing, 
process control, sales, or organized operations of any nature— it requires individuals 
proficient in computer and networking technologies as well as software, database, and 
web-based development and application . These individuals must be as equally proficient 
with the organizational functions of accounting, finance, management, marketing, and 
operations as they are with the technologies of programming, software development, 
networking, operating systems, database and web technology implementation. 

The individual seeking a degree in Computer Information Systems must understand 
the difference between a degree in Computer Information Systems and a degree in 
Computer Science. While the Computer Science degree focuses on the products, 
methods, inventions, and standards used to develop and produce information systems, 
the focus of the Computer Information Systems degree is on the implementation, 
integration, application, management, and maintenance of information systems in all 
types of environments. As new technologies and information systems emerge, they must 
be appropriately applied across a broad range of organizations in support of specific 
operations. Computer Information System graduates combine their strong technology 
background with an equally strong understanding of organization, communication, 
and management skills to ensure the appropriate fit and application of technology 
within these organizations. 

The Computer Information Systems degree provides the combination of course work 
that prepares a student to meet this very complex and challenging role. The General 
Education coursework helps build the student's people skills and problem-solving skills. 



Department of Business Administration 133 



The General Business Component coursevvork builds the student's understanding of 
modern organizations and the specilic types of problems these organizations must solve 
using information systems. The Computer-related Component provides the student 
with a deep understanding of computer technologies, such as requirement analysis, 
programming, networking, database and web development. Finally, the student takes 
integrative coursevvork in management of information systems, business system 
analysis and design, project management, business analytics, and data mining. This 
combination of technological and organizational training produces highly competent 
cross-trained graduates that can apply information systems in the ever-growing job 
market of business and organizational information systems. Additionally, our students 
are encouraged to participate in internships that provide experiential exposure to the 
practical application of these principles. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Computer Information Systems 
must complete a minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0 or higher, and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. 
Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a 
pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Computer Information Systems must maintain a 2.0 average 
in the General Business Component courses, a 2.0 average in the Computer Information 
Systems Component courses, and successfully complete IFSIOO or IPS 105 within the 
first 30 credits at the College. In addition, students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each 
course that serves as prerequisite to a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course 
description section of this catalog for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in 
a prerequisite course may lengthen the time to graduation. Students must also earn 
at least a 2.0 in their senior capstone course, BUS495. Students graduating with a 
declared major in Computer Information Systems may not simultaneously declare a 
minor in Information Systems. 

The required courses for the Computer Information Systems Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MAT 120 Applied Calculus* 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management** ' ' 

IBS200 Introduction to International Business 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro* 

ECO20 1 Principles of Economics-Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 



*Course fulfills a General Education or Area Distribution Requirement. 
**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



134 Programs of Study 



QBA265 Business Statistics II 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 

BUS495 Business Strategy and Policy ** 

Computer Information Systems Component Courses 

IFS 175 Information Systems Development Fundamentals 

IFS225 Programming for Business Applications 

IFS285 Introduction to Database 

IFS320 Web Development 

IFS325 Introduction to Networks 

IFS335 Network Services Design 

IFS425 E-Commerce 

IFS435 Project Management 

IFS465 Business Analytics and Data Mining 

IFS475 Information Security and Ethics 

Computer Information Systems (suggested course sequence) 

Credits 
3 

3 

0-3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 

3 

32-35 



Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

IT Competency OR(AND) 

Personal Productivity Computing 

Applied Calculus 

IS Development Fundamentals 

Principles of Marketing 

Principles of Management 

Information Literacy 

Human Communication 

Area I Distribution Requirement 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 

Area V Distribution Requirement 



Sophomore Year 

Principles of Economics 

Financial Accounting 

Managerial Accounting 

Business Statistics I and II 

Programming for Business Applications 

Intro to Database 

Area I Distribution Requirement 



Credits 
6 

3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 



**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



Department of Business Administration 135 



Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Physical Education 1_ 

31-32 

Junior Year Credits 

Operations Management 3 

Business Law I 3 

Managerial Finance 3 

Introduction to Networks 3 

Management Information Systems 3 

Network Services Design 3 

Web Development 3 

Introduction to International Business 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1_ 

31-32 

Senior Year Credits 

Project Management 3 

Data Mining 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

E-Commerce 3 

Info Security and Ethics 3 

Business Strategy and Policy 3 

Required Electives 12 

30-31 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics 

The Economics Major equips students with the necessary skills to understand economic 
developments within our industrialized society. As globalization and politics continue 
to increase the complexity of nearly every industry in the world economy, there is 
increasing demand for professionals with both quantitative and communication skills 
to analyze and forecast business and economic trends. The Economics Major provides 
the knowledge and develops the skills needed to attain decision-making positions 
within government, academia, the financial sectors, and industry. It also serves as a 
strong foundation for graduate studies. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Economics must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Economics must maintain a 2.0 average in the General 
Business Component Courses, a 2.0 average in the Economics Component Courses, 



136 Programs of Study 



and successfully complete IFSIOO or IFS105 within the first 30 credits at the College. 
Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in the senior business capstone course 
(BUS495). In addition, students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves 
as a prerequisite to a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description 
section of the catalog for specific prerequisites). Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite 
courses may lengthen the time to graduation. Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or 
higher in their senior capstone course, BUS495. Students graduating with a declared 
major in Economics may not simultaneously declare a minor in Economics. 

The required courses for the Economics Major are: 

General Business Component Courses — v 

MAT120 Applied Calculus* 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MGT 1 50 Principles of Management* * 

ECO200 Principles of Economics - Macro* 

ECO201 Principles of Economics - Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 

QBA265 Business Statistics II 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

QB A3 1 5 Research Methods in Business 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 

BUS495 Business Policy** 

Economics Component Courses 

ECO360 Intemiediate Macroeconomics 
Intermediate Microeconomics 
Money and Banking 



ECO350 

ECO370 

IBS400 

ECO450 



International Economics 
Economics and Finance Seminar 



Choose five elective courses from: 

ECO300 Economic Perspectives 

EC0325 Mathematical Economics 

ECO340 Economic Development 

EC0375 History of Economic Thought 

ECO390 Managerial Economics 

FIN3 1 Real Estate Finance 



*Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



Department of Business Administration 137 



FIN340 Financial Institutions and Markets 

BUS346 Business Law II OR EC0492/493 

ECO490/491 Economics and Finance Internship 

BUS498/499 Independent Study 

PS352 Introduction to Public Finance 

SOC220 American Social Problems 



Economics (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

IT Competency Exam OR (AND) 

Personal Productivity Computing 

Applied Calculus 

Information Literacy 

Human Communication 

Principles of Marketing 

Principles of Management 

Area I Distribution Requirement 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 



Sophomore Year 
Principles of Economics 
Financial Accounting 
Managerial Accounting 
Business Statistics I and II 
Elective 

Area V Distribution Requirement 
Area III Distribution Requirement 
Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 

6 

32-35 

Credits 
6 
3 
3 
6 
3 
6 
3-4 

\ 

31-32 



Junior Year '" , 

Business Law I 

Management Information Systems 
Managerial Finance I 
Money and Banking 
Intermediate Macroeconomics 
Intermediate Microeconomics 
Area III Distribution Requirement 
Operations Management 
Research Methods In Business 
Economics Elective 
Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3-4 
3 
3 
3 

1 

31-32 



138 Programs of Study 



Senior Year Credits 

International Economics 3 

Business Strategy and Policy 3 

Economics and Finance Seminar 3 

Economics Electives 12 

Electives _9 

30 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering Management 

The Engineering Management program combines core courses in both engineering 
and management fields with advanced business courses to provide the graduate the 
ability to design, improve, and solve problems with the business processes that create 
and deliver value to customers. 

Engineering Management majors begin their studies in an engineering discipline, 
developing the fundamental analysis, critical thinking, and creative problem-solving 
skills traditionally associated with an Engineering discipUne. Engineering Management 
majors then take advanced business courses and apply those analysis, critical thinking, and 
creative problem-solving skills to integrate business processes with the human element of 
management, to design and improve these processes throughout the supply chain. 

Requirements For Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Engineering Management must 
complete a minimum of 133 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. In addition, students majoring in 
Engineering Management must earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in every course in the 
Engineering Component and maintain a 2.0 average in the Management Component. 
Students must also earn a 2.0 or higher in their senior capstone course, BUS495. 

The required courses for the Engineering Management Major are: 

Common Core Requirements (17 credit hours) 

WRT 1 02 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
M ATI 71 Calculus I (4) 

Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements (18 credit hours) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 
Area IV: AmericanAVestern Civilization and Government (6) 
Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 



Department of Business Administration 139 



Free Electives (12 credits) 



Math/Science Component (18 credits) 

MAT 172 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 

MAT272 Differential Equations 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics)* 

PHY260 Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism)* 

PHY261 Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) Lab"^ 

Business Component (45 credits) 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macroeconomics** 

ECO201 Principles of Economics-Microeconomics** 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management 

MGT355 Business Process Management 

BUS495 Business Strategy and Policy 

IBS International Business Elective (300-400 level only) 

Choose two electives from the following: 

MGT310 Lean Systems 

QBA310 Management Science 

IBS361 Global Supply Chain Management 

IFS435 Project Management 

MGT495 Continuous Improvement Consulting 

Engineering Component (22-24 credits) 

EGRIOO EPADSI 

ME250 Statics 

ME264 Strength of Materials 

ME265 Materials and Solids Lab 

ECE280 Electrical Circuits 

ECE281 Electronic Measurement and Signal Processing 

EGR305 Statistical Design & Process Control 

ME320 Thermodynamics 

Choose one elective from the following: 

ME260/261 Materials Science and Lab 

ME252 Dynamics & Vibration 



♦Physics courses fulfill Area III Distribution Requirement. 
**Economics courses fulfill Area II Distribution Requirement. 



140 Programs of Study 



EGR342/ME35 1 Systems Modeling and Lab 

ME360/361 Fluid Mechanics and Lab 

ME480 Independent Study 

EGR49 1 Co-Operative Learning 

Engineering Management (suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year 


Credits 


Analytical Reading and Writing 


3 


Academic Writing 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 


Calculus I and II 


8 


EPADS I 


2 


Human Communication 


3 


Area Distribution Requirements 


3 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


Principles of Management 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




31 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Engineering Physics 


5 


Free Elective 


3 


Differential Equations 


4 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


Financial Accounting 


3 


Principles of Economics 


6 


Area Distribution Requirement 


3 


Statics 


3 


Statistical Design and Process Control 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




34 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Business Law I 


3 


Operations Management 


3 


Managerial Finance 


3 


Management Information Systems 


3 


Area Distribution Requirements 


6 


Free Elective 


3 


Strength of Materials and Lab 


4 


Foundation of Electrical Engineering and Lab 


4 


Engineering Physics 


4 




33 



Department of Business Administration 141 



Senior Year Credits 

Business Process Management 3 

International Business Elective 3 

Business Electives 6 

Business Strategy 3 

Area Distribution Requirements 6 

Thermodynamics 4 

Engineering Elective 3-4 

Free Electives 6 

34-35 

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Entrepreneurship 

The Entrepreneurship Major offers a curriculum that will prepare students to start their 
own businesses and/or to become project managers in a large business. According 
to the Small Business Administration (SB A), small businesses in the United States 
provide approximately 75% of the net new jobs added to the economy, represent 
99.7% of all employers and employ 50.1% of the private work force. The bachelor's 
degree in Entrepreneurship will provide students with the basic foundations of business 
administration while focusing on the unique factors that shape the entrepreneurial or 
small business endeavor. Coursework includes case studies, team projects, and real- 
world business consulting integrating such topics as principles of Internet use and 
web design, sources of financing, and the global marketplace— all designed to provide 
students with the tools necessary for entrepreneurial success. Students will develop 
business competency in effective business communication methods, problem-solving 
techniques, and critical thinking. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Entrepreneurship must complete 
a minimum of 1 24 credits , achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2 .0 or higher, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Entrepreneurship must maintain a 2.0 average in the 
General Business Component courses, a 2.0 average in the Entrepreneurship 
Component courses, and successfully complete IFSIOO or IFS105 within the first 30 
credits at the College. In addition, students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course 
that serves as a prerequisite to a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course 
description section of this catalog for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 
in prerequisite courses may lengthen the time to graduation. Students must also earn 
a grade of 2.0 or higher in the senior capstone course, ENT495. Students graduating 
with a declared major in Entrepreneurship may not simultaneously declare a minor 
in Entrepreneurship. 



142 Programs of Study 



The required courses for the Entrepreneurship Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MAT120 Applied Calculus* 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management** 

ECO200 Principles of Economics - Macro* 

ECO201 Principles of Economics - Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 

QBA265 Business Statistics II 

OBD280 Leadership and Change 

IFS305 Management Information Systems** 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 

IBS410 International Entrepreneurship 

ENT495 Business Plan Writing** 

Entrepreneurship Component Courses 

ENT150 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 

ENT220 Entrepreneurial Marketplace 

ENT260 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 

ENT340 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Entrepreneurship 

ENT360 Financing Entrepreneurship Ventures 

ENT450 Small Business Consulting 

Entrepreneurship Electives — three of the following 

ENT280 Gender and Minority Issues in Entrepreneurship 

ENT320 Introduction Franchising 

ENT490 Entrepreneurship Internship 

MKT335 New Product Planning & Marketing 

MKT355 Internet Marketing 

Entrepreneurship (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 
IT Competency Exam OR (AND) 

Personal Productivity Computing 0-3 

Applied Calculus 3 



*Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



Department of Business Administration 143 



Information Literacy 


2 


Human Communication 


3 


Introduction to Entrepreneurship 


3 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


Principles of Management 


3 


Area I Distribution Requirement 


6 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 




32-35 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Principles of Economics 


6 


Financial Accounting 


3 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


Business Statistics I and II 


6 


Leadership and Change 


3 


Entrepreneurial Marketplace 


3 


Entrepreneurship and Small Business 


3 


Area III Distribution Requirement 


3-4 


Physical Education 


1 




31-32 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Business Law I 


3 


Managerial Finance I 


3 


Legal and Ethical Aspects of Entrepreneurship 


3 


Management Information Systems 


3 


Financing Entrepreneurship Venture 


3 


ADR III Distribution Requirement 


3-4 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Operations Management 


3 


Elective 


3 


Physical Education ' 


1 




31-32 


Senior Year 


Credits 


International Entrepreneurship 


' 3 


Business Plan Writing 


3 


Small Business Consulting 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Entrepreneurship Electives 


9 


Electives 


9 



30-31 



144 Programs of Study 



Bachelor of Science with a Major in Finance 

The Finance major provides students with the academic background essential for 
pursuing careers in all areas of finance. The focus of study is a program in which 
students are exposed to decision-making in the corporate finance world, risk-return 
tradeoffs in the investments world, financial planning in financial intermediaries, and 
the importance of global markets. The Finance major requires students to develop 
technical skills and apply them to solve problems faced by financial managers. The 
Finance major prepares students for careers in corporate finance, commercial and 
investment banking, financial planning, financial analysis, and risk management. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Finance must complete a minimum 
of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, and complete 
the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General 
Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Finance must maintain a 2.0 average in the General Business 
Component courses, a 2.0 average in the Finance Component courses, and successfully 
complete IFSIOO or IFS105 within the first 30 credits at the College. In addition, 
students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to a 
subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in their senior 
capstone course, BUS495. Students graduating with a declared major in Finance may 
not simultaneously declare a minor in Finance. 

The required courses for the Finance Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MAT120 Applied Calculus* 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management** 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro* 

ECO20 1 Principles of Economics-Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 

QBA265 Business Statistics II 

QB A3 1 5 Research Methods in Business 

FIN300 Managerial Finance 

IFS305 Management Info Systems 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 



*Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



Department of Business Administration 145 



BUS495 Business Strategy and Policy*^ 
Finance Component Courses 



FIN320 


Investments 


FIN340 


Financial Institutions 


ECO390 


Managerial Economics 


IBS405 


International Finance 


FIN410 


Managerial Finance II 


FIN450 


Finance Seminar** 


)ur elective courses chosen from the following: 


ACC305 


Taxation I 


ACC320 


Intermediate Accounting I 


BUS346 


Business Law II 


IBS400 


International Economics 


FIN310 


Real Estate Finance 


FIN330 


Risk Management and Insurance 


PS352 


Introduction to Public Finance 


FIN420 


Derivative Securities 


ECO490/491 


Finance Internship OR EC0492/493 


BUS498/499 


Independent Study 



Required Electives-12 credits (These elective credits must be taken outside of the 
Department of Business Administration.) 



Finance (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

IT Competency Exam OR 

Personal Productivity Computing 

Applied Calculus 

Area III Distribution Requirement 

Area I Distribution Requirements 

Information Literacy 

Human Communication 

Area V Distribution Requirement 

Principles of Marketing 

Principles of Management 



Credits 
3 
3 

0-3 
3 
3-4 
6 
2 
3 
3 
3 

3 

32-36 



Sophomore Year 
Financial Accounting 
Managerial Accounting 



Credits 
3 
3 



**Course is designated as a writing/communications-intensive course. 



146 Programs of Study 



Principles of Economics 6 

Statistics 6 

Physical Education 1 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Required Elective _3 

31 

Junior Year Credits 

Business Law I 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Management Information Systems ~"^3 

Research Methods in Business 3 

Investments 3 

Managerial Finance I 3 

Financial Institutions 3 

Managerial Economics 3 

Financial Elective 3 

Operations Management 3 

Physical Education _1 

31 

Senior Year Credits 

Business Strategy and Policy 3 

Managerial Finance II 3 

International Finance 3 

Finance Electives 9 

Finance Seminar 3 

Required Electives _9 

30 

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Management 

Management is the process through which work is accomplished with and by the human 
resources in organizations. Broadly, it encompasses the major functions of setting 
organizational objectives and developing plans, organizing work, allocating resources, 
directing and leading others, and evaluating organizational and human performance. 
The courses offered in the Management area encompass all of these functions, and 
Management majors take at least one basic introductory course that covers each 
function. The Management major allows students to choose a minor in Human 
Resource Management, Leadership and Organization Development, or Operations 
Management. Students who do not choose a minor may pursue other courses within 
the Management area that fit their personal, academic, and career goals. 



Department of Business Administration 147 



Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Management must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Management must maintain a 2.0 average in the General Business 
Component courses, a 2.0 average in the Management Component courses, and 
successfully complete IPS 100 or IPS 105 within the first 30 credits at the College. In 
addition, students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite 
to a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Pailure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in their senior 
capstone course. BUS495. Students graduating with a declared major in Management 
may not simultaneously declare a minor in Management. 

The required courses for tfie Management Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MAT 120 Applied Calculus* 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro* 

ECO201 Principles of Economics-Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 

QBA265 Business Statistics II 

OBD280 Leadership and Change in Organizations 

IPS 305 Management Information Systems 

PIN300 Managerial Finance I 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 

BUS495 Business Strategy and Policy** 

Management Component Courses 

BUS150 Introduction to Business 

QBA315 Research Methods in Business 

IBS375 International Management 

MGT445 Ethical Leadership & Social Responsibility in Organizations** 

Management Electives Sequence: choose one option 



^Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

*'*Course is designated as a vvriting/communications-intensive course. 



148 Programs of Study 



Human Resource Minor 

MGT220 Human Resource Management 

MGT315 Human Resource Development 

OBD225 Organizational Behavior 

MGT330 Labor Relations OR 

MGT420 Employment Law 

MGT435 Recruitment and Selection in HR 

Leadership and Organizational Development Minor 

MGT220 Human Resource Management 

OBD225 Organizational Behavior 

BUS 350 Management of Not-for-Profit Organizations 

OBD345 Organization Theory 

OBD385 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

Operations Minor 

MGT310 Lean Systems 

MGT349 Service Operations 

IBS361 Global Supply Chain Management 

MGT460 Advanced Operations Management 

MGT495 Continuous Improvement Consulting 

Management Elective Sequence 

MGT220 Human Resource Management 
OBD225 Organizational Behavior 
Three additional Management electives with at least one course at the 400-level 

Required Electives- 16- 18 credits (Twelve of these elective credits must be taken 
outside of the Department of Business Administration. The remaining electives may 
be used to complete a minor.) 

Management (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Introduction to Business 3 
IT Competency Exam OR 

Personal Productivity Computing 0-3 

Applied Calculus 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 6 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 6 

32-35 



Department of Business Administration 149 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Principles of Economics 6 

Financial Accounting 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 

Business Statistics I and II 6 

Leadership and Change 3 

Human Communication 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Physical Education _J^ 

31 

Junior Year Credits 

Managerial Finance I 3 

Management Information Systems 3 

International Management 3 

Business Law I 3 

Management Electives 6 

Operations Management 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Required Electives 6 

Physical Education _\_ 

31 

Senior Year Credits 

Research Methods In Business 3 

Business Strategy and Policy 3 
Ethical Leadership & Social Responsibility 

in Organizations 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 3-4 

Management Electives 9 

Required Electives • 9 

30-31 

Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Marketing 

The bachelor of science degree with a major in Marketing is designed to meet the 
needs of students planning a career in marketing. The wide range of marketing courses 
and electives offered by the Department mirrors the wide range of occupations open 
to the professional marketer. Businesses employ individuals with skills and expertise 
in marketing as advertising copywriters, advertising strategists, brand managers, 
global marketing strategists, logistics managers, market analysts, market researchers, 
merchandise managers, professional salespeople, retail buyers, retail store managers, 
and sales managers. 



150 Programs of Study 



Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Marketing must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Students majoring in Marketing must maintain a 2.0 average in the General 
Business Component courses, a 2.0 average in the Marketing Component courses, and 
successfully complete IFSIOO or IFS105 within the first 30 credits at the College. In 
addition, students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite 
to a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students must also earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in their senior 
capstone course, BUS495. Students graduating with a declared major in Marketing 
may not simultaneously declare a minor in Marketing. 

The required courses for the l\/larl<eting Major are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MAT 1 20 Applied Calculus* 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MGT 1 50 Principles of Management 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro* 

ECO201 Principles of Economics-Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

QBA260 Business Statistics I 

OBD280 Leadership and Change in Organizations 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

QBA265 Business Statistics II OR 

QBA310 Management Science 

BUS345 Business Law I 

MGT350 Operations Management** 

BUS495 Business Strategy and Policy** 

Marketing Component Courses 

MKT2 10 Market Measurement and Analysis** 

IBS370 International Marketing 

MKT450 Marketing Research 

MKT475 Marketing Policies and Strategies** 



*Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 

**Course is designated as a vvriting/communications-intensive course. 



Department of Business Administration 151 



Marketing Elective Sequence: Choose one of the following options 

Retailing Minor 

MKT230 Retailing 

MKT320 Retail Buying and Merchandising 

MKT355 New Product Planning 

Two Marketing Electives from: 

MKT220 Personal Selling 

MKT310 Fashion Marketing 

MKT340 Logistics 

MKT360 Consumer Behavior 

Marketing Communication Minor 



MKT220 


Personal Selling 


CM221 


Introduction to Public Relations 


MKT330 


Advertising 


MKT355 


Internet Marketing 


One Marketing Elective 


Marketing Manag 


ement Minor 


MKT340 


Logistics 


MKT350 


Business Marketing 


MKT355 


Internet Marketing 


MKT380 


Sales Management 



One Marketing Elective , 
Hospitality Marketing Minor 

;i 

CM22I Introduction to Public Relations j 

CM324 Event Marketing 

MKT325 Hospitality Marketing : 

MKT345 Tourism Marketing 

IBS370 International Marketing | 

ji 

Marketing Elective Sequence: ji 

Five Marketing electives with at least three courses at the 300-level or above. j 

Required Electives 16-18 credits (Twelve of these elective credits must be taken 

outside of the Department of Business Administration. The remaining electives may I 

be used to complete a minor.) ( 

Marketing (suggested course sequence) i 

■) 

Freshman Year Credits j 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 i 

Academic Writing 3 

IT Competency Exam OR 

Personal Productivity Computing 0-3 



152 Programs of Study 



Applied Calculus 3 

Information Literacy " 2 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Human Communication 3 

Required Elective 3 





32-35 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Principles of Economics 


6 


Financial Accounting 


3 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


Business Statistics I 


3 


Management Science OR Business Statistics II 


3 


Market Measurement and Analysis 


3 


Marketing Elective or Intro to Pub. Relations 


3 


Area III Distribution Requirement 


3-4 


Required Elective 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




31-32 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Business Law 


3 


Marketing Electives 


6 


International Marketing 


3 


Required Elective 


3 


Management Information Systems 


3 


Operations Management 


3 


Managerial Finance 


3 


Area I Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




31 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Business Strategy and Policy 


3 


Marketing Research 


3 


Marketing Policies & Strategies 


3 


Area III Distribution Requirement 


3-4 


Required Electives 


9 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Marketing Elective 


6 



30-31 



\ Department of Business Administration 153 



ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

Associate of Science Degree with a Major in Business Administration 

The associate of science degree with a major in Business Administration is viewed as 
the first step toward a baccalaureate degree in business. Courses in the associate degree 
program fulfill many of the General Business Component Courses in the baccalaureate 
programs offered by the Department of Business Administration. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Business Administration must 
complete a minimum of 67 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 
or higher, and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses 
used to complete general education requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 
Students majoring in Business Administration must successfully complete IPS 100 or 
IPS 105 within the first 30 credits at the College. In addition, students must attain a 2.0 
or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to a subsequent Business course. 
(Refer to the course description section of this catalog for specific prerequisites.) 
Pailure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen the time to graduation. 

The required courses for tfie Business Administration IVIajor are: 

General Business Component Courses 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MGT150 Principles of Management 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro* 

ECO20 1 Principles of Economics-Micro* 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

Business Administration Component Courses 

QBA260 Business Statistics I , 

BUS345 Business Law I 

Three Business Electives (A Business elective is any course offered in the Department 
of Business Administration with the following prefixes- ACC, BUS, ECO, FIN, IBS, 
IFS, MGT, MKT, OBD, and QBA.) Before enrolling in a course as a Business elective, 
students must meet the prerequisites and conditions of the course as outlined in the 
course description. 

Required Electives-six credits 



•"Course fulfills a General Education Requirement. 



154 Programs of Study 



Business Administration (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 
IT Competency Exam OR 

Personal Productivity Computing 0-3 

Applied Calculus 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Human Communication 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Required Electives 6 

32-36 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Principles of Economics 6 

Financial Accounting 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 

Business Statistics I 3 

Business Law I 3 

Business Electives 9 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Physical Education 2 

35 

DEPARTMENTAL MINORS 

Minor in Accounting 

The minor in Accounting provides students with a theoretical understanding of 
accounting. This background is useful for students majoring in related fields such as 
Finance, Informatics, or Business Administration. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students graduating with a declared major in Accounting may 
not simultaneously declare a minor in Accounting. 

Requirements of the Accounting Minor (18 credits}: 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

ACC225 Managerial Accounting 

ACC320 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACC325 Intermediate Accounting II 



Department of Business Administration 155 



Two Accounting Electives [An Accounting elective is any course beginning with an 
ACC prefix (or IBS415) that is not required in the Accounting minor and for which 
the prerequisite is met.] 

Minor in Advertising 

The Advertising minor provides students with the opportunity to explore the full 
range of the advertising process including advertising theory, advertising strategy, ad 
copywriting. media planning, and ad production. Pursuing an Advertising minor is 
especially beneficial to students planning careers in advertising, public relations, or 
any area of marketing communication. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements in Advertising Minor (18 credits): 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MKT330 Advertising 

MKT360 Consumer Behavior 

MKT390 Advanced Advertising 

Two courses chosen from the following: 

ARTllO Concepts of Design 

ART134 Concepts of Computer Graphics 

ART215 Drawing I 

ART246 Digital Photography 

CM 120 Broadcast Performance I 

Minor in Business Administration 

The minor in Business Administration provides non-business students with an 
opportunity to explore basic business courses and supplement their major field of study. 
Non-business majors interested in pursuing an MBA would benefit by completing this 
minor as a foundation for most MBA programs. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to a 
subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog for 
specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen the 
time to graduation. This minor is not available to students selecting any of the majors 
offered by the Department of Business Administration, including Informatics. 

Requirements of the Business Administration Minor (18 credits): 

BUS 1 50 Introduction to Business 
MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 
ACC220 Financial Accounting 



156 Programs of Study 



ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro (can be used to satisfy ADR II) 

BUS345 Business Law I 
One Business Elective (A Business elective is any course beginning with prefixes 
ACC, BUS. ECO, ENT, FIN, IPS, MGT, MKT, OBD, QBA that is not required for 
the minor and for which the prerequisite is met. ) 

Minor in Economics 

The Economics minor provides students with the ability to analyze a broad range 
of socioeconomic phenomena and policy. Regulation, environmental protection, 
economic growth and development, the distribution of income, inflation, and the level 
of employment are the basics of economics. Economics contains the theoretical core 
for business finance, accounting, and marketing and provides a solid foundation for 
graduate work in business administration and law. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements of the Economics Minor (18 credits): 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro 

ECO201 Principles of Economics-Micro 

ECO360 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

ECO390 Managerial Economics 

ECO400 International Economics 

Plus one of the following: 

ECO300 Economic Perspectives 

ECO350 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ECO490 Economic Internship 

BUS498 Independent Study 

Minor in Entrepreneurship (21 credits) 

The minor in Entrepreneurial Studies focuses on topics such as innovation, change, 
the development of new business firms and formulating new business plans. Students 
planning to pursue careers in small business, whether a family-owned business or a 
new venture, will find this minor beneficial. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

ENT 150 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 
MKT 100 Principles of Marketing 
MGT150 Principles of Management 



Department of Business Administration 157 



ENT220 The Entrepreneurial Marketplace 

ENT260 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 

One courses selected from the following: 

ENT280 Gender and Minority Issues in Entrepreneurship 
ENT320 Introduction to Franchising 

Minor in Finance 

The minor in Finance provides the student with some specialization in the area of 
financial services. This growing service area includes careers in banking, brokerage 
firms, investments, and insurance. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students graduating with a declared major in Finance may not 
simultaneously declare a minor in Finance. 

Requirements of the Finance D/linor (15 credits): 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro 

ECO20 1 Principles of Economics-Micro 

FIN300 Managerial Finance I 

FIN320 Investments 

FIN410 Managerial Finance II 

One course selected from the following: 

ACC305 Taxation I 

ACC320 Intermediate Accounting I 

BUS346 Business Law II 

FIN310 Real Estate Finance , ,;- 

FIN330 Risk Management and Insurance 

FIN420 Derivative Securities 

BUS498 Independent Study 

Minor in Hospitality Marketing 

The Hospitality Marketing minor covers the basics of marketing in the hospitality 
industry. This industry is one of the fastest growing segments of the service economy. 
The Hospitality Marketing minor is designed for students interested in a career in any 
aspect of the hospitality industry including lodging, restaurants, clubs, resorts, and 
events like concerts or sports contests. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 



158 Programs of Study 



Requirements for Hospitality Marketing Minor (18 credits): 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

CM22 1 Introduction to Public Relations 

MKT325 Hospitality Marketing 

CM 3 24 Event Marketing 

MKT345 Tourism Marketing 

IBS370 International Marketing 

Minor in Human Resource Management 

The Human Resource Management minor emphasizes the skills and abilities needed 
by professionals who work in human resource or training and development units of 
organizations. Topics covered in these courses include recruitment, selection, and 
training of human resources, employment law, and labor relations. A student declaring 
a Human Resource minor may not also declare a Management minor. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements of tfie IHuman Resource Minor (18 credits): 

MGT 1 50 Principles of Management 

OBD225 Organizational Behavior 

MGT220 Human Resource Management 

MGT315 Human Resource Development 

MGT330 Labor Relations OR 

MGT420 Employment Law 

MGT435 Recruitment/Selection of Human Resources 

Minor in Information Systems 

The minor in Information Systems provides a foundation in information systems, 
which along with the chosen major enables a student to pursue entry-level information 
systems career opportunities in specialized fields of expertise. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to a 
subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog for 
specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen the 
time to graduation. Students graduating with a declared major in Computer Information 
Systems may not simultaneously declare a minor in Information Systems. 

Requirements of the Information Systems Minor (18 credits): 

One 100-level course 

(Choose from IFS105, IFS160, IFS175, IFS180) 
One 200-level course 

(Choose from IFS200, IFS205, IFS225) 



Department of Business Administration 159 



Two 300-level courses 

(Choose from IFS305. IFS320. IFS325, IFS335, IFS350) 
Two 400-level courses 

(Choose from IFS410, IFS435. IFS440, IFS460, IFS465, IFS475, 

IFS490,IFS491) 

Minor In International Business 

The minor in International Business is designed to add international business acumen 
to students acquiring a non-business degree. Whether majoring in Business or not, 
students in all majors will be confronted with marketing their skills and interacting 
with business in a globally competitive environment. Students planning to apply their 
non-business degree in an international setting will find this minor beneficial whether 
marketing themselves, their ideas, or their abilities. The International Business 
minor allows the non-business major to add both insight into business and in-depth 
international experiencee to their chosen degree. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements of the International Business Minor (18-24 credits): 

BUS 150 Introduction to Business 
IBS200 International Business 

Choose one of the following three course sequences: (6 credits) 

Marketing Sequence 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 
IBS370 International Marketing 

Management Sequence 

MOT 1 50 Principles of Management 
IBS375 International Management 

Law Sequence 

BUS345 Business Law I 
PS 307 International Law 

One course from the following (3 credits) 

PS 302 International Relations 
G344 Economic Geography 

Language Competency (See section below International Management minor for 
definition of Language Competency.) (6 credits) 

Study Abroad Experience or International Studies (regional) Course (See section 
below International Management Minor for Study Abroad Information.) (3 credits) 



160 Programs of Study 



(International Studies course selections are: INT 101, INT 143, INT 144, INT 145, 
INT146,INT147,INT150) 

Minor in International Management 

For the Business minor, the International Management minor rounds out their strong 
comprehensive Business curriculum by adding an in-depth international exposure that 
combines both cultural and practical experiencee. The International Management 
minor deepens the Business degree major's understanding of how organizations 
function in an intensely integrated global environment while broadening the cultural 
understanding via foreign language, coursework involving international relations or 
economic geography, and the opportunity to study abroad. 

In addition to Business Department coursework, International Management 
minors will be required to satisfy a language competency and complete either a study 
abroad experience or international coursework. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation or preclude a student from completing this minor. 

Requirements of the International Management Minor (18-24 credits): 

IBS370 International Marketing 
IBS375 International Management 
IBS400 International Economics 

Select one course from the following 

PS 302 International Relations 
G344 Economic Geography 
Language Competency (0-6 credits) (See the Language Competency section below for 
more information.) 

Select one of the following options: 

Study Abroad Experience (See section below the International Management Minor 
for Study Abroad Information.) 

International Business Course: IBS405, IBS415, PS307 

International Studies (regional) Course: INTlOl ,INT143,INT144,INT145,INT146, 
INT 147, INT 150. The course selected must be related to the geographic area in which the 
language from the student's language competency coursework is the primary language. 

Language Competency Requirement Explanation 

All International Business and International Management minors must demonstrate 
a language competency in English and at least one other language. Language 
competency may be fulfilled by 1) successful completion of at least two successive 
college-level courses in a foreign language (advanced placement credits are 
acceptable for this competency), 2) residency in another country that resulted 



Department of Business Administration 161 

In language competency; or 3) demonstrated competency from another source, 
e.g., the language was spoken and written at home to the level that the student is 
competent. Verification of language competency other than successful completion 
of two successive college-level courses or advanced placement must be obtained 
from the English and Humanities Department's language coordinator. Verification 
of language competency by the English and Humanities Department can only be 
granted for languages taught at York College. Competency in English, for those 
students not having English as their primary language, will be assumed upon 
successful completion of WRT102, WRT202, and CM 104 in the Common Core 
Requirements. Demonstration of language competency, English or foreign, does 
not exempt students from ADR V requirements. It is strongly recommended that 
students demonstrating language competency take either advanced language courses 
or fulfill the ADR V requirement by taking an additional language. 

Study Abroad Experience or International Regional Coursework 
Requirement Explanation: 

All students minoring in International Business or International Management must 
either complete a semester abroad or fulfill three credits of international coursework. 
Students opting to study abroad must complete and transfer back at least three credits 
to satisfy this requirement. Study abroad is recommended in the latter half of the 
student's sophomore or junior year. The student may attend any foreign college or 
university approved by the study abroad advisor. A grade of 2.0 or better must be 
obtained in any course taken abroad in order for credit to transfer back to York College. 
U.S.- born students attempting either of these minors must have a valid passport by the 
start of their sophomore year with an expiration date extending beyond the planned 
study abroad semester. International students must make certain they have all travel 
documentation required to complete the study abroad requirement. The study abroad 
option is preferred for both minors. 

Minor in Leadership and Organization Development 

Students completing the minor in Leadership and Organization Development will 
be equipped with the tools necessary to identify organizational vision and values, 
align structure with environment and vision, identify and strengthen communication 
networks, articulate and measure results, build teams, aid in conflict management, 
and develop performance enhancement strategies. This minor will provide students 
with the opportunity for cross-disciplinary study and is an excellent foundation for 
students who desire a graduate degree in either Human Resource Management or 
Organizational Behavior and Development. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 



162 Programs of Study 



Requirements of the Leadership and Organization Development Minor 
(18 credits): 

MGT150 Principles of Management 

OBD225 Organizational Behavior 

OBD280 Leadership and Change 

OBD345 Organizational Theory and Processes 

BUS350 Management of Not-for-Profit Organizations 

MGT445 Ethical Leadership 

Minor in Management 

The minor in Management affords students the flexibility to tailor their management 
coursevvork to fit their chosen career goals. For example, students can choose a 
course from each facet of management such as operations, human resource/labor 
relations, and small business, or can choose two courses in operations and two courses 
in human resources. The minor, along with the chosen major, enables a student to 
pursue management career opportunities in specialized fields. A student declaring a 
Management minor may not also declare a Human Resource or Operations minor. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students graduating with a declared major in Management may 
not simultaneously declare a minor in Management. 

Requirements of the IVIanagement Minor (18 credits): 

MGT150 Principles of Management 

MGT220 Human Resource Management 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

IBS375 International Management 

IFS435 Project Management 

MGT445 Ethical Leadership & Social Responsibility in Organizations 

Minor in Marketing 

The Marketing minor is designed to be of benefit to students planning a career in 
a field related to marketing. Since the opportunities in marketing are so broad, the 
requirements for the minor are designed to give the student as much flexibility as 
possible. The Marketing minor would be especially beneficial to individuals planning 
to seek positions as advertising copywriters, advertising strategists, brand managers, 
global marketing strategists, logistics managers, market analysts, market researchers, 
professional salespeople, public relations specialists, and sales managers. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. Students graduating with a declared major in Marketing may 
not simultaneously declare a minor in Marketing. 



Department of Business Administration 163 



Requirements of the Marketing Minor (15 credits): 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MKT350 Business Marketing 

MKT360 Consumer Behavior 

MKT410 Marketing Ethics 

One course chosen from the following: 

MKT210 Market Measurement and Analysis 

MKT220 Personal Selling 

MKT230 Retailing 

MKT3 10 Fashion Marketing 

MKT320 Retail Buying/Merchandising 

MKT325 Hospitality & Tourism Marketing 

MKT330 Advertising 

MKT335 Internet Marketing 

MKT355 New Product Planning & Marketing 

MKT340 Logistics 

IBS370 International Marketing 

MKT380 Sales Management 

MKT390 Advanced Advertising 

MKT410 Marketing Ethics 

MKT450 Marketing Research 

MKT475 Marketing Policy & Strategy 

MKT490 Marketing Internship 

Minor in Marketing Communication 

The Marketing Communications minor is designed for students interested in a career 
in the promotion aspects of any organization that requires communicating with the 
various publics of an organization. The minor covers how to communicate with the 
various publics using traditional and non-traditional media and methods available 
to marketing departments and organizations. A student interested in a career as a 
spokesperson or in the communications department of a business organization would 
find the Marketing Communications minor to be especially beneficial. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements for Marlceting Communications Minor (18 credits): 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MKT2 1 Market Measurement and Analysis 

CM221 Introduction to Public Relations 

MKT220 Personal Selling 

MKT355 Internet Marketing 



164 Programs of Study 



Minor in Marketing Management 

The minor in Marketing Management is designed to provide the tools for managing 
some aspect of the marketing function. The minor examines how to manage key 
elements of marketing including product management and distribution. It includes 
special emphasis on marketing in the B2B market, and students planning on a career 
marketing to business or government clients will find the Marketing Management 
minor to be especially useful. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements for Marketing Management Minor (18 credits): 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

MGT 1 50 Principles of Management 

MKT340 Logistics 

MKT350 Business Marketing 

MKT355 New Product Planning 

MKT380 Sales Management 

Minor in Operations Management 

In the Operations Management minor, students study the transformation process where 
inputs and the efforts of human resources combine to create a product or service. Here, 
topics of importance include advanced operations, inventory management, purchasing, 
and logistics. The Operations Management minor prepares students for entry-level 
positions such as a production planner, buyer, or inventory analyst. A student declaring 
an Operations Management minor may not declare a Management minor. Non-business 
majors will require extensive prerequisite work above these 21 credits. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements for Operations Management Minor (21 credits): 

MGT 150 Principles of Management ^ 

MGT310 Lean Systems 

MGT349 Service Operations 

MGT350 Operations Management 

IBS361 Global Supply Chain Management 

MGT460 Advanced Operations Management 

IFS435 Project Management OR 

MGT495 Continuous Improvement Consulting 

BUS498 Independent Study 



Department of Business Administration 165 

Minor in Quantitative Management 

The minor in Quantitative Management is designed for students who want to develop 
quantitative skills to supplement their major and career fields. This minor would be 
especially advantageous to students interested in quantitative research, engineering, 
operations research, or computer science. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements for Quantitative IVIanagement l\/linor (18 credits): 

MAT 120 Applied Calculus OR 

MAT171 Calculus 

MAT260 Elem. Linear Algebra 

QBA260 Business Statistics I OR 

MAT250 Elements of Statistics 

QBA265 Business Statistics II 

QBA310 Management Science 

EGR305 Statistical Design and Process Control 

Minor in Retailing 

The minor in Retailing is designed to be of benefit to students planning a career in or 
related to retailing. Retailing careers fall into two broad areas. The first is operations, 
which would include department management, store management, and district 
management. The other area of retailing is merchandising, which would include 
merchandise buying, merchandise display, and merchandise planning. 

Students must attain a 2.0 or higher in each course that serves as a prerequisite to 
a subsequent Business course. (Refer to the course description section of this catalog 
for specific prerequisites.) Failure to attain a 2.0 in prerequisite courses may lengthen 
the time to graduation. 

Requirements for Retailing Minor (18 credits): 

MKTIOO Principles of Marketing 

MKT230 Retailing 

MKT320 Retail Buying 

MKT355 Internet Marketing 

Two courses chosen from the following: 

MKT220 Personal Selling 

MKT3 1 Fashion Marketing 

MKT340 Logistics 

MKT360 Consumer Behavior 




DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



TRANSFORMING THE FUTURE BY INSPIRING 
EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION 

As professional educators, members of the Department of Education believe that 
the quintessential challenge in education is the quality preparation of candidates 
for a profession in education. To achieve this goal, the mission of the Department 
is to develop skills in critical thinking, decision-making, and cognitive and affective 
development. The Department is committed to the preparation of students who are 
highly skilled in the dynamics of human growth, a receptiveness to change and 
innovation, and the ability to empower learners with the requisite knowledge, skills, 
and attitudes to become lifelong learners. As well, the Department seeks to educate 
future teachers who are committed to their own lifelong learning. 

The Department of Education currently offers a baccalaureate degree in Elementary 
Education (K-6), Elementary Education (K-6)/Special Education (N-12), Music 
Education (K-12), as well as degrees in several secondary certification programs (7- 
12) in cooperation with other academic departments. Secondary certification options 
include: Biology, English, General Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies. These 
certification programs are also available to individuals already holding an undergraduate 
or graduate degree in another discipline. In addition, it provides an option through 
the Alternate Program for careers other than the traditional K- 1 2 classroom teaching 
setting. The Department also offers a master of education degree with concentrations 
in Educational Leadership or Reading Specialist. Additionally, it serves as a center 
for professional development offering courses, workshops, and other educational 
experiences that meet Pennsylvania Department of Education mandates under Act 48 
for continuing educational certification. 

QUALITY OF INSTRUCTION 

Each year, York College Education majors take the PRAXIS exams, a series of four to 
six tests administered by the Educational Testing Service. Successful completion of these 
exams is a requirement for certification in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as well as 
many other states. They are also an indication of the strength of the instructional program. 
York College students are well prepared for successful careers as classroom teachers. 

PROGRAM PRINCIPLES 

Teachers will play an increasingly central role in the social and cognitive development 
of youth. Accordingly, we believe that these professionals must serve as intellectual 
and personal models to their students. It is in this spirit that the Teacher Education 
Program commits itself to the following Principles of Effective Teaching: 

1 . Effective teaching demands a dedication to learning and development. 

2. Effective teaching requires an understanding of how learning occurs and the 
interpretation of student needs to assure continuous progress in learning. 

3. Effective teaching is an ongoing process of assessing needs, planning 
instruction, and evaluating results. 



166 



Department of Education 167 



4. Effective teaching requires the utihzation and integration of knowledge 
derived from many academic areas. 

5. Effective teaching requires teachers who are intellectual and personal models 
for students. 

GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

The prospective teacher will: 

1. Demonstrate effective communication skills in oral, written, and nonverbal 
behavior; 

2. Demonstrate knowledge of human development and its implications for the 
teaching-learning situation; 

3. Be able to define the roles and responsibilities of teachers and other school 
staff members; 

4. Be able to describe the American educational system with respect to its 
historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations as well as its functions 
in today's society; 

5. Demonstrate an acceptable degree of skill in applying educational principles 
in an instructional setting; and 

6. Demonstrate the characteristics of a professional. 

ADMISSION, ADVANCEMENT, AND RETENTION IN 
TEACHER EDUCATION* 

The Teacher Education Program at York College reflects the research and practices 
that have been identified as fostering excellence in teaching. We strive to advance 
only the highest caliber teacher candidates at each level of the preparatory program. 
The minimum grade point average required of our students in order to advance to the 
professional semester reflects our belief that teachers must serve as intellectual models 
for their students. In addition to a demonstrated level of intellectual competence, we 
consider certain attributes to be associated with the caliber of teacher we desire to 
graduate from our program. (See section tided Advancement to Student Teaching.) 

Admission to Degree Program 

Elementary Education, Elementary Education/Special Education, Music Education, 
and Secondary Certification students must meet the general admission requirements of 
the College. Admission to the Education Program does not guarantee advancement 
to the Pre-Professional Educator Status in the Teacher Education Program nor to 
Student Teaching Semester. 

The York College Department of Education requires that all education majors 
provide a clear Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Record Check (Act 34), a clear 
Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History Clearance (Act 



*The York College Department of Education is approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) as 
a certifying agency. From time to time PDE enacts new regulations or mandates that supersede the requirements 
listed in the York College catalog. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisors on a regular basis to keep 
abreast of any changes or modifications in state regulations. 



168 Programs of Study 



151), and a clear Federal Criminal History Record (Act 114). These clearances must 
be submitted to the Department of Education prior to participation in any Field 
Experience and as a requirement to obtain PPES (Pre-Professional Educator Status). It 
is also required that all three clearances be updated and submitted to the York College 
Department of Education prior to entering the Student Teaching Semester, EE/SE/ 
SPE404. The updated clearances must be requested and dated no more than six 
months prior to the first day of student teaching. Clearances are only accepted by the 
Department of Education if they show the following status: 

• A clear Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Record Check must have a status 
of "No Record." 

• A clear Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse History 
Clearance must state "No Record Exists." 

• A clear Federal Criminal History Record must read, "A search of the fingerprints 
on the above individual has revealed no prior arrest." 

If a record exists at any of the above referenced points the student will be refused 
permission to move forward in York College's Teacher Preparation Program and may 
not be readmitted until the record has been expunged and all clearances have been 
resubmitted to the York College Department of Education. 

Freshmen normally schedule general education classes and not education courses. 
With the exception of ED22 1 Introduction to American Education, ED200 Instructional 
Technology, and early placement in a Field Experience, freshmen do not normally 
participate in coursework in the professional education block (designated by an EE or 
SE prefix). 

At the time of admission to the College, students enter as pre-candidates and are 
assigned a faculty advisor. 

Advancement to Pre-Professional Educator Status (PPES) 

Application for Pre-Professional Educator Status in the Teacher Education Program is 
made after satisfactory completion of the following criteria: 

1 . An overall GPA of 2.80 for those admitted on or after July 2, 2008 and within 
the first 48 credits at York College of Pennsylvania. 

2. Successful completion of WRT102, WRT202, CM104, two math courses, 
and ED221 with a minimum grade of 3 in each course. 

3. Acceptable performance on the PRAXIS I PPST reading, writing, and 
mathematics exams. (This includes transfer students.) 

4. Evidence of successful completion of 30 hours of Field Experience must 
be provided by the applicant by presenting the appropriate copies of the 
Attendance and Evaluation Forms. . 

Field Experience j 

The importance of being in the K-12 classroom prior to student teaching is confirmed 
through the opportunities provided by the Field Experience Program. Specifically, there 
is a mandatory in-school experience required of all those who seek teacher certification. 



Department of Education 169 



Each candidate is to accumulate a minimum of 150 hours of Field Experience time. 
This entails working with students in a classroom setting as an instructional assistant, 
or minimally, as an observer. In this setting, students are encouraged to become 
actively involved in the teaching process. Each candidate is expected to have had five 
such experiences (of 30 hours each) prior to the Student Teaching Semester. Three of 
these five settings must be in a pubHc school classroom environment and at least one 
of these in an urban public school. 

Retention in the Program 

Retention in the Program is based upon the following criteria: 

1 . An overall GPA of 2.80 for those admitted on or after July 2, 2008, and at the 
time of Pre-Professional Educator Status. 

2. Compliance with, and successful progression toward, completion of Field 
Experience requirements (as specifically outlined in the Field Experience 
Handbook.) 

3. Possession of the personal and professional attributes that are consistent with 
effective teaching. 

4. Compliance with the Academic Integrity Policy of York College. Violation of 
this policy v/ill result in dismissal from the Program. 

Advancement to Student Teaching 

One year prior to the academic term of the Student Teaching Semester students will 
complete an application form. All applications for student teaching must be submitted 
one year prior to the Student Teaching Semester. At the end of the semester when 
application is made, students must have a GPA of 3.00 or higher, have completed 
a minimum of 120 hours of Field Experience, have successfully completed the 
PRAXIS I PPST Writing, Reading and Mathematics Exams and been approved for 
Pre-Professional Educator Status. Applicants" records are reviewed by the Coordinator 
of Field Experience. 

Qualifications for Release of Student Teaching Placement: 

1. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 

2. Successful completion of 150 hours of Field Experience 

3. Successful completion of all professional courses as designated on 
departmental checklists. (All ED, EE, SPE and SE courses, English and 
Speech, PSY221 , ED370, MUS291, ART396, Science and Math, Literature 
and other required courses must be taken for a grade, 2.0 or higher, and may 
not be taken on a pass/fail basis.) 

4. Affirmation by the Coordinator of Field Experience, based upon 1-3 above, 
and demonstration of the requisite professional and personal attributes 
consistent with effective classroom teachers. The latter consists of: 
Competence in written and oral expression 

Professional attitude 



170 Programs of Study 



Personal enthusiasm 

Ethical, moral character 

Personal organization 

Ability to meet deadlines 

Good interpersonal skills 

Ability to accept and profit from constructive criticism 

Personal maturity 

Use of prudent judgment 

Class attendance 

Demonstrated interest in educational activities 

(special events, Student Education Association, etc.) 

(Note: Students who have not removed deficiencies in their professional or academic 
specialization courses and those who are on academic or disciplinary probation 
cannot be granted permission to enroll in the Student Teaching Semester.) 

If there are any circumstance(s) (geographical, family, economical, physical, or 
psychological) of which the Department of Education should be made aware, which 
may affect the safety of the candidate or that of the student(s) with whom he/she 
shall be working, it (they) should be shared with the Coordinator of Field Experience 
(written and in a sealed envelope). 

A review process exists for students who wish to appeal a decision made by the 
Coordinator of Field Experience or the Department of Education and is detailed in the 
Pre-Education and Education Major Handbook. 

THE STUDENT TEACHING SEMESTER 

The Student Teaching Semester consists of two courses and student teaching. One 
course is completed within a four-week period; another (Student Teaching Practicum) 
continues throughout the semester. Student teaching begins the first day of the semester 
and continues to the end of the academic term. During the first four weeks, student 
teachers will be in their assigned classrooms every day, Monday through Thursday, 
and attend class on campus during Friday afternoons (afternoons that they do not 
have class, the student teacher should remain in their classroom). Beginning the fifth 
week, student teachers will be in the assigned classrooms all day. There is a stipulation 
that students take no additional coursework during the Student Teaching Semester. 
Additionally, students are strongly advised not to hold a job, coach, be involved in 
an organization, or be involved in any extracurricular activities during the Student 
Teaching Experience. 

Student Teaching 

The Department of Education endeavors to make suitable arrangements for students 
admitted to the Student Teaching Semester. It cannot guarantee assignments. It should 
be noted that student teachers adhere to the district calendar, policies, and practices 
adopted by the school to which they are assigned. York College provides liability 
insurance for its student teachers. 



Department of Education 171 



Removal from Student Teaching 

A student teacher may be removed from student teaching for a variety of academic, 
personal, health, and/or professional reasons. The decision to remove a student teacher 
is made jointly by the cooperating teacher, building principal, college supervisor, 
Coordinator of Field Experience, and the chair of the Department of Education. The 
student teacher is then placed in EE/SE/SPE405; Focused Studies in Education (see 
course description, pages 359, 362, and 364). 

Return to the Department of Education following 
Removal from Student Teaching 

A former student teacher wishing to return for a second chance may not submit an 
application for readmittance to the Department of Education until a minimum of 
one semester has passed. The student will have to meet all current requirements and 
coursework in effect at the time of reapplication. The student will have to provide 
evidence of growth and maturity and the student will have to submit to an interview 
with the faculty of the Department of Education. The department faculty will evaluate 
all the preceding information and rule on the request for readmittance. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Students must meet all of the graduation requirements set by the College and by the 
certification area in which they are enrolled. 

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS 

a. Students who wish to receive Pennsylvania certification must submit an application 
to the York College Department of Education for that certification. 

b. Teacher candidates must meet all requirements set by the Pennsylvania Department 
of Education. These include: 

1 . Successful completion of a baccalaureate degree with a cumulative GPA of at 

least 3.0. 

2. Successful completion of the Pennsylvania-required PRAXIS II Examinations 
administered by Educational Testing Service. 

3. Successful completion of a YCP Teacher Certification Program, including the 
student teaching experience. 

C. Students who desire a specific out-of-state certification must contact the appropriate 
state Department of Education for requirement information and procedures. 

Policy for Transfer Students 

If students wish to transfer into the Teacher Education Program from another college/ 
university, they must submit a letter of interest and transcript, have earned a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 2 .8 , have a 3 .0 or higher in each of WRT 1 02 , WRT202, 
CM 104, two math courses, and ED221 (must be taken at York College), successfully 
completed the PRAXIS I PPST Reading, Writing and Mathematics Exams, and submit 



172 Programs of Study 



a minimum of two written letters of recommendation from professional people. If the 
student has less than a 3.0 in any of the six courses or has not yet completed the six 
courses, the student must enter York College as an undeclared student, complete the 
remaining coursework, and then transfer into the desired Education major. Students 
wishing to transfer into the Teacher Education Program from another program within 
York College must obtain an Application to Transfer into Education, submit a written 
letter of approximately 300 words, a minimum of two letters of recommendation 
from persons qualified to describe the student's qualifications, and a copy of a current 
transcript indicating a minimum 2.8 grade point average. Additionally, the student 
must meet the current Education coursework minimum grade requirements, earn a 
3.0 or higher in each of WRT102, WRT202, CM 104, two math courses, ED221 , and 
successfully complete the PRAXIS I PPST Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Exams. 
Applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Submission of the proper 
materials does not guarantee acceptance. Students will be notified at the end of their 
interview of the disposition of their application. Students who are rejected two times 
must wait one semester to reapply. 

No Education courses beginning with the prefix EE or SE may be scheduled 
until the student is officially accepted as an Education major. ED221 Introduction 
to American Education, ED200 Instructional Technology, SPE coursework, and a 
few selected other courses may be scheduled by any non-major. 

The Department of Education reserves the right to determine which courses 
will transfer and be accepted. Currently, several courses must be completed at York 
College of Pennsylvania, such as ED221 Introduction to American Education. Please 
check with the Department of Education for the most current list. Once the above 
requirements have been met, students will be conditionally accepted as matriculated 
Education students for two semesters. Prior to, or during the second semester after 
acceptance, students must also submit the Pre-Professional Educator Status (PPES) 
application. 

If students meet the PPES requirements, they will be accepted into the Teacher 
Education Program as a candidate. These individuals must continue to comply with the 
retention, advancement, graduation, and certification requirements for completion of the 
Teacher Education Program. If any individuals do not meet these requirements, they will 
be dismissed from the Teacher Education Program. 

Education Degree without Certification — "Alternate Program" | 

Teacher Certification may be achieved through the successful acquisition of a 
baccalaureate degree in Elementary Education, Elementary Education/Special 
Education, Music Education, or, for secondary candidates, completing a baccalaureate 
in a designated major with an education core (See Secondary Education). A 
baccalaureate degree may be obtained without certification by those individuals who 
have expressed interest in the broader concept of "education" (as it refers to related 
careers and interests) but who do not desire work in a public school classroom setting. 
Reflective of this option, students elect to schedule Directed Professional Educational 
Experience (EE/SE/SPE416) for a maximum of four credits. This experience is tailored 



Department of Education 173 



to meet the personal and career goals of the individuals. Accordingly, the experience 
might include a combination of coursevvork and research activity that responds to the 
student's particular needs. Those electing, or being recommended for, this option may 
seek career paths that include work experiences dealing with people and education 
in a variety of settings other than the classroom. Examples of career paths served by 
this non-certification degree are: positions involving training and development in a 
variety of businesses and corporations; educational specialists within social services 
or governmental agencies; administrators of community agencies; careers in public 
relations and banking; and youth organizations. Students opting for this program must 
officially apply one year prior to entering their Student Teaching Semester. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREE 

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) Program at York College of Pennsylvania is a 
professional preparation program designed to build the leadership capacity of regional 
public and private schools. A result of years of discussion and planning, the M.Ed. 
Program was developed in collaboration with school district personnel and regional 
advisory groups. After a thorough analysis of local needs, two areas of specialization 
were identified: Reading Specialist and Educational Leadership. 

The M.Ed. Program at York College prepares graduates to assume leadership 
roles in public and private schools. Candidates in the M.Ed. Program may specialize 
in Educational Leadership, leading to Pennsylvania Department of Education 
Certification as a K- 12 Principal, or in Reading Specialist, leading to a Pennsylvania 
Department of Education Certification as a K-12 Reading Specialist. 

There is also a K-12 Principal Certification or a K-12 Reading Specialist 
Certification track for those students who currently possess a master's degree and 
wish to work in a school-based position requiring Pennsylvania Principal or Reading 
Specialist Certification. In addition to the M.Ed. Program, professional development 
courses are available as a means by which educators can enhance and extend their skills 
and knowledge in a variety of areas. These courses are wide-ranging and designed to 
meet an array of personal and professional needs. Professionals wishing to enroll in 
one or more graduate level professional development courses will register through the 
M.Ed. Program as a non-degree student. 

The program is oriented toward working professionals. All courses are offered in 
the evening hours, Monday through Thursday, during the regular academic year and 
in both day and evening classes each summer. Core courses are offered throughout 
the academic year. Courses are taught by a faculty comprised of full-time and adjunct 
professors in classes where enrollment has been managed to allow for constructive 
individual attention. The members of the M.Ed, full-time faculty have held positions 
in public and/or private education and continue to be engaged in ongoing educational 
consultation. Most of the M.Ed, adjunct professors are currently working in their 
chosen fields and, therefore, are a valuable resource to the Program. By design, the 
York College M.Ed, model creates continuous opportunities for collaboration and 
mentoring. Course and field experiences are authentic and directly applicable to the 
realities of education today. 



174 Programs of Study 



The Educational Leadership degree/K-1 2 Principal Certification program includes 
12 credit hours of core courses, 21 credit hours of specialization courses, and an 
administrative internship. 

The K-12 Principal Certification sequence includes one core course (specific 
course to be determined in consultation with the Educational Leadership Coordinator), 
21 credit hours of specialization courses, and an administrative internship. 

The Reading Specialist degree/K-1 2 Reading Specialist Certification program 
includes 12 credit hours of core courses and 24 credit hours of reading specialization 
courses, including two clinical practicum experiences. 

The K-12 Reading Specialist Certification sequence includes one core course. 
Advanced Educational Psychology, and 24 credit hours of reading specialization 
courses, including two clinical practicum experiences. 

Certification for Individuals Possessing an 
Undergraduate or Graduate Degree 

Please contact the Department of Education for further details as specific coursework and 
other experiences are necessary for candidates to be recommended for certification. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education/Special Education 
Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education (English, Social Studies) 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education (Biology, 

General Science, Mathematics) 
Bachelor of Science in Music Education 
Bachelor of Science in Sport Management 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Elementary Education must 
complete all program requirements including a minimum of 131 credits, achieve the 
appropriate grade point average, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher 
in each of the following four Common Core courses — two English courses, the Human 
Communications course, and two math courses (specific course names are specified 
on the appropriate Education worksheet). Moreover, a 2.0 or higher must be achieved 
in all remaining Common Core courses. A cumulative York College of Pennsylvania 
grade point average of 3.0 must be achieved in order to student teach and graduate. 
Students seeking certification in Elementary Education will be required to have 150 
hours of Field Experience prior to the Student Teaching Semester and meet specific 
requirements as noted in the Pre-Education and Education Major Handbook. 



Department of Education 175 

Required Courses in Elementary Education: 

Required Major Coursework Meeting Certification Standards 

BIOllO General Biology' 

BIO 120 Field Natural History ' OR 

BIO 124 Oceanography ' OR 

BIO 150 Biology II 

BIO 152 Biology II 'OR 

BIO206 Freshwater Ecology' 

BIO208 Biology of Animals ' OR 

BIO210 Marine Biology' OR 

BI0212 Environmental Biology' OR 

BI0216 Microbes: Unseen Life on Earth' OR 

BI0232 Plant Taxonomy ' OR 

BIO300 Ecology AND 

Any Physical Science Recommended: ESS 152 Earth/Space Science' 
OR PSC152 OR PSC154 Physical Science' 

LIT XXX Literature Elective (Any American or British) 

G243 Introduction to Geography 

H22 1 History of American Civilization I OR 

H222 Histor> of American Civilization II 

M AT2 1 5 Sets and Number Systems II 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

PSY221 Developmental Psychology' 

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology 

Pre-Professional Education Coursework 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education { must be taken at York College ) 

ART396 Art Education for Elementary Teachers 

MUS29 1 Educational Experience in Music^ 

ED370 Psychology of Teaching/Elementary Education 

Professional Preparation Courses^ 

EE300 Teaching Elementary Language Arts 

EE301 Foundations of Reading Instruction 

EE302 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 

EE304 Teaching Elementary Social Studies 

EE3 10 Physical Education/Health in the Elementary Classroom' 

EE3 1 5 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 

EE3 16 Teaching Science in the Elementary School 

EE380 Topics in Children's Literature 

EE390 Seminar in Curriculum 



176 Programs of Study 



EE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education^ 

EE403 Educational Evaluation 

EE430 Professional Development 

SPE333 Specific Learning Disabilities 

SPE340 Behavioral Design and Intervention 

Student Teaching Semester ^■'* 

EE404 Student Teaching 

EE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

EE413 Selected Topics in Education 

OR Alternate Professional Semester 
EE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience^ 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

-Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

'EE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the fall or spring term immediately prior to 

the Student Teaching Semester. 

■^Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

■^Taken as an option to EE404 by students seeking the degree vvithout certification. 

Elementary Education (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Sets and Number Systems I & II 6 

Information Literacy 2 

General Psychology 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

Introduction to American Education (ED221) 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1 

Instructional Technology (ED200) 3 

33 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Laboratory Science' 6-8 

Introduction to Geography 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 6 

Educational Experience in Music (MUS291) 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Literature 3 

History of American Civilization 3 



Department of Education 177 



Art Education for Elementary Teachers 



33-35 



Junior Year 

Teaching Elementary Language Arts (EE300) 

Diagnostic & Remedial Reading (EE302) 

Area V Distribution Requirement 

Developmental Psychology 

Psychology of Teaching/Elem. Ed. (ED370) 

Foundations of Reading (EE301) 

Physical Education 

Teaching Elementary Social Studies (EE304) 

Teaching Elementary Math (EE315) 

Physical Education/Health in the Elementary 

Classroom (EE3 10) 

Seminar in Curriculum (EE390) 

Educational Evaluation (EE403) 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

3 
3 

_3 
34 



Senior Year 

Topics in Children's Literature (EE380) 

Teaching Elementary Science (EE3 16) 

Professional Development (EE430) 

Specific Learning Disabilities (SPE333) 

Behavioral Design Intervention (SPE340) 

Elective (outside the major) 

Community and Legal Issues in Education (EE402)* 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
_3 
20 



Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 

Student Teaching (EE404) 

Selected Topics (EE4 13) 

Practicum in Student Teaching (EE412) 

OR 

Alternate Professional Semester 

Directed Professional Educational Semester (EE416) 

Other selected academic courses 



12 



1-4 
8-11 

21-27 



♦Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 



178 Programs of Study 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education and Special 
Education (Dual Certification) 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Elementary Education/Special 
Education (dual certification) must complete all program requirements, including a 
minimum of 157 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher 
in each of the following four Common Core courses— two English courses, the Human 
Communications course, and one math course (specific course names are specified on 
the appropriate Education worksheet). Moreover, a 2.0 or higher must be achieved 
in each of all remaining Common Core courses. Students seeking certification in 
Elementary Education/Special Education will be required to have 150 hours of 
Field Experience prior to the Student Teaching Semesters (90 hours in Elementary 
Education and 60 hours are directed through Special Education coursework) and meet 
specific requirements as noted in The Handbook for Teacher Certification Students. 
Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the 
Student Teaching Semester. 

Required Courses in Elementary Education/Special Education:** 

Courses Meeting Certification Standards 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

M AT2 1 5 Sets and Number Systems II 

PS Y 1 00 General Psychology 

PSY221 Developmental Psychology' 

G243 Introduction to Geography 

H22 1 History of American Civilization I OR 

H222 History of American Civilization II 
Literature Elective (must be American or British Literature) 

Sciences 

Three credits are to be chosen from BIOllO, BIO120, BI0124, BIO150, BI0152, 
BIO206, BIO208, BIO210, BI0212, BI0216, and BI0232 and three credits chosen 
from ESS152, PSC152, PSC154, or any other Physical Science lab course. 

Pre-Professional Education Coursework 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 



**Subject to change based on Pennsylvania Department of Education Requirements. 
'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 



Department of Education 179 



ED370 Psychology of Teaching/Elementary Education 

ART396 Art Education for Elementary Teachers 

MUS291 Educational Experience in Music 

PS Y227 Psychology of Exceptional Children 

SPE205 ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder 

SPE364 Educational Testing 



Professional Preparation Courses 

EE300 Teaching Elementary Language Arts 

EE30 1 Foundations of Reading Instruction 

EE302 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 

EE304 Teaching Elementary Social Studies 

EE3 10 Physical Education/Health in the Elementary Classroom 

EE3 1 5 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 

EE316 Teaching Elementary Science 

EE380 Topics in Children's Literature 

EE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education* 

SPE206 Emotional Support 

SPE302 Assistive Technology 

SPE303 Mental Retardation 

SPE333 Assessment and Instruction Design: Specific Learning Disabilities 

SPE338 Assessment and Instructional Design: Mild, Moderate, and Severe 

Disabilities 

SPE340 Behavioral Design/Intervention and Classroom Management 

SPE351 Transitions in Special Education 

Elementary Education Student Teaching Semester 

EE404 Student Teaching 

EE412 Student Teaching Practicum 

EE413 Selected Topics in Education 

Special Education Student Teaching Semester 

SPE412 Student Teaching Practicum/Special Education 
SPE404 Student Teaching/Special Education 
SPE451 Analysis of Research: Senior Seminar 

Elementary Education/Special Education {suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year 

Human Communication (CM 104) 
General Psychology (PS Y 100) 
Analytical Reading and Writing 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



*Community and Legal issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to tiie Student Teaching Semester. 



180 Programs of Study 



Academic Writing 3 

Information Literacy (IFL 101) 2 

Sets and Numbers (MATl 15 and MAT215) 6 

Introduction to Sociology (SOCIOO) 3 

Introduction to American Education (ED221) 3 

Instructional Technology (ED200) 3 

Physical Education 1 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

33 

Summer Credits 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 
History of American Civilization I (H121) OR 

History of Western Civilization (H221) 3 

6 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Psychology of Exceptional Children (PS Y227) 3 

Art Education for Elementary Teachers (ED396) 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 6 

Educational Experiences in Music (MUS291) 3 

Introduction to Geography (G243) 3 

Physical Education 1 

Literature 3 

Emotional Support (SPE 206) 3 

Mental Retardation (SPE 303) 3 

ADHD/ Autism Spectrum Disorder (SPE205) _3 

34 

Summer Credits 

Laboratory Science (BIO) 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

6 

Junior Year Credits 

Developmental Psychology (PSY221) 3 

Foundations of Reading (EE30 1 ) 3 

Teaching Elementary Language Arts (EE300) 3 

Assessment and Instructional Design: SLD (SPE333) 3 
Physical Education/Health in the Elem. Classroom (EE3 10) 3 

Teaching Elementary Mathematics (EE315) 3 

Teaching Elementary Social Studies (EE304) 3 



Department of Education 181 



Diagnostic and Remedial Reading (EE302) 3 

Assistive Technology (SPE302) 2 

Topics in Children's Literature (EE380) 3 

Psychology of Teaching/ Elementary Education (ED370) 3 

32 

Summer Credits 

Lab Science (Physical Science) 3 

Elective (outside the major) 2 

5 

Senior Year Credits 

Teaching Elementary Science 3 

Assessment and Instructional Design: Mild. Mod. Sev. (SPE338) 3 

Community and Legal Issues in Education 3 

Transitions in Special Education (SPE351) 3 

Educational Assessment (SPE364) 3 

Behavior Design/Intervention and Classroom Mgt. (SPE340) 3 

Is 

Elementary Education Student Teaching Semester 12 

Student Teaching (EE404) 

Practicum in Student Teaching (EE412) 

Selected Topics (EE4 13) ■ ^ :'>..:. 

Special Education Student Teaching Semester 12 

Student Teaching Special Education (SPE404) 
Practicum in Student Teaching (SPE4 12) 
Analysis of Research: Senior Seminar (SPE451) 

Bachelor's Degrees in Secondary Education 

Certification programs are offered in a variety of academic disciplines. This provides 
the candidate opportunity to teach at the junior high, middle school, and/or high school 
level. (General Science certification is primarily oriented to the junior high and middle 
school.) Students pursuing certification in Secondary Education must complete the 
discipline certification requirements of the respective academic department. (Please 
review all notations at the end of each program of study.) 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Secondary Education-English 

The Secondary Education-English Program is designed to prepare students for a career 
in teaching English at the secondary school level. The program includes course work 
in the following areas: General Education Requirements, English and Humanities 



182 Programs of Study 



Department requirements , specialization courses or English elective courses , professional 
preparation courses, and a professional semester of student teaching. This program 
provides instruction and practical experiences in determining effective instructional 
approaches in the teaching of particular components of the secondary school curriculum: 
language study, reading, literature, writing, listening, and speaking. Students develop an 
awareness of the many responsibilities faced by secondary English teachers and learn 
how to work within today's school environment to improve instructional effectiveness 
and efficiency. The education courses focus on the effectiveness of the teacher's methods 
and on the value of the students' learning experiences. 

Coursework for the Secondary Education-English program emphasizes study of 
literature, writing, language and linguistics, and drama or film. It includes 12 credit 
hours of English electives, with two courses chosen from literature, one of which must 
be multicultural. 

Students must apply for admission into the Teacher Education Program according 
to the Education Department's guidelines. In addition, students must complete 150 
hours of Field Experience and pass the Praxis I PPST Reading, Writing and Mathematics 
exams and the English PRAXIS exam. (See Department of Education for a complete 
description of teacher preparation requirements.) 

In addition, students must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to 
begin the Student Teaching Semester and must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher in each 
WRT102, WRT202, CM 104, MATlll, a second math course, and ED221. Students 
must pass all remaining core courses with a 2.0 or higher and may not take any of the 
courses offered by the Department on a pass/fail basis. 

Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education-English 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-English 
must complete all program requirements including a minimum of 125 credits, 
achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher in each of WRT102, 
WRT202, CM104, MATlll, a second math course, and ED221. Students must pass 
all remaining core courses with a 2.0 or higher and may not take any of the courses 
offered by the Department on a pass/fail basis. 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-English: 

Discipline Certification Requirements^ 

LIT200 Perspectives on Literature 

THE205 Text Performance 

THE254 Introduction to Theatre OR 

FLM2 1 6 Introduction to Film 

LIT28 1 American Literature to 1 885 ' OR 



Department of Education 183 



LIT282 American Literature after 1885' 

LIT283 British Literature to 1750' OR 

LIT284 British Literature after 1750' 

LIT310 Language and Linguistics 

WRT3 1 5 Advanced Composition 

LIT323 Shakespeare P OR 

LIT324 Shakespeare IP 

English Electives: 12 credits in FLM, LIT. THE. or WRT required including at least 
three credits of LIT and one of the following three-credit multicultural literature 
courses- 

LIT203 African-American Literature 

LIT285 European Literature to 1600 

LIT286 European Literature since 1600 

LIT291 Short Story 

LIT346 Literature and Society 

LIT347 Literature and Psychology 

LIT416 Modern Drama 

Pre-Professional Education Courses- 

MAT (See Advisor) 

PSYIOO General Psychology' 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology' 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

Professional Preparation Courses- 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education"* 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE35 1 Teaching Strategies 

SE353 Teaching Communication 

SE360 ReadingAVriting across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester -•'^ 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies^ 

SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

■^Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

'SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

■•Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

'Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 



184 Programs of Study 



Secondary Education-English (suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year 


Credits 


Analytical Reading and Writing 


3 


Academic Writing 


3 


Area IV Distribution Requirements 


6 


Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Mathematics 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


General Psychology 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirements 


6 


Mathematics 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




33 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Human Communication 


3 


Introduction to American Education 


3 


Instructional Technology 


3 


Psychology of Teaching/Secondary Education 


3 


Area III Distribution Requirements 


6-8 


Perspectives on Literature 


3 


American Literature 


3 


English Elective 


3 


Physical Education 


1 


Free Electives 


3 




31-33 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Introduction to Theatre or Film 


3 


Advanced Composition 


3 


British Literature 


3 


Language and Linguistics 


3 


Text Performance 


3 


English Elective 


3 


Secondary School Experience 


3 


Teaching Strategies 


3 


Free Electives 


7 




31 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Reading/Writing across the Curriculum 


1 


English Electives 


6 


Shakespeare I or II 


3 



Department of Education 185 



Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Teaching Communication 3 

Free Elective 3 

Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 12 
Student Teaching (SE404) OR 
Focused Studies (SE405) 
Practicum in Student Teaching (SE412) 

Selected Topics (SE41 3) _ 

31 



*Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to tiie Student Teaching Semester. 

Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education-Social Studies, 
with a Double Major in History 

Requirements For Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-Social 
Studies must complete a minimum of 133 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.0 or above, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete 
the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete the 
General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Social Studies Education must maintain a 3.0 or 
higher in each of the following four Common Core courses— two English courses, the 
Human Communications course, and one math course. They must also take a second 
elected mathematics course to be determined by the student and the advisor. 

Secondary Education-Social Studies is a dual major offered in conjunction with 
the Department of Education. Students who complete the Social Studies major also 
fulfill the requirements for the History major. 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-Social Studies: 

Discipline Certification Requirements' 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro' OR 

ECO20 1 Principles of Economics-Micro ' 

G243 Introduction to Geography 

G341 Geography of North America 

H2 1 9 History of Western Civilization I 

H220 History of Western Civilization II 

H221 History of American Civilization I' 

H222 History of American Civilization II' 

PS 141 American Government: Institutuions' OR 

PS 142 American Government: Process' 

PS242 State and Local Government' 

SOC220 American Social Problems' 



186 Programs of Study 



ANT2 10 Introduction to Physical Anthropology OR 

ANT220 Cultural Anthropology' 

H240 Methods/Theory History 

H440 Senior Seminar in History 

1 8 additional credits in History, H223 or higher 

Pre-Professional Educator Status (PPES)^ 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED221 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

Math (see advisor) 

PS Y 100 General Psychology 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education"^ 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE35 1 Teaching Strategies 

SE352 Teaching Citizenship in Secondary Education 

SE360 ReadingAVriting across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester-'^ 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies^ 

SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics in Education OR 

Alternative Program^ 
SE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

^Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

'Advancement to PPES requires successful completion of WRT102, WRT202, CM104, MATl 1 1 , second math 

course, ED22I with a minimum grade of 3.0 in each course. 

''SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

^Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

'Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

'Students electing Alternative Program will select SE4I6 and other appropriate course work. Must have prior 

approval from advisor and department chair. 

Secondary Education-Social Studies (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

History of Western Civilization I and II 6 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 



Department of Education 187 



Information Literacy 

Introduction to Sociology 

General Psychology 

Area I Distribution Requirement 

Physical Education 

Introduction to American Education 



2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
_3 
31 



Sophomore Year 
Math 

Human Communication 
Instructional Technology 
Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed 
Area III Distribution Requirements 
Area V Distribution Requirements 
American Civilization I and II 
American Government 
Methods/Theory of History 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
6 
6 
3 

36 



Junior Year 

State and Local Government 

Introduction to Geography 

Geography of North America 

Cultural or Physical Anthropology 

American Social Problems 

History Electives 

Secondary School Experience 

Teaching Strategies 

Area I Distribution Requirement 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 
3 
3 

36 



Senior Year 

Macro or Micro Economics 

History Elective 

History Seminar 

Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Education 

Community and Legal Issues in Education 

ReadingAVriting across Cuiriculum 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 



Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or greater required) 
Student Teaching SE404 OR 
Focused Studies SE405 OR 
Alternative Program 
Practicum in Student Teaching SE412 



12 



188 Programs of Study 

Selected Topics SE413 



31 



Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education-Biology 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-Biology must 
complete all requirements including a minimum of 139 credits, achieve cumulative 
grade point average of 3 .0 or higher, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher 
in each of the following five Common Core courses— two English courses (WRT102, 
WRT202), the Human Communications course, and two math courses (specific course 
names are specified on the appropriate Education worksheet). 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-Biology: 

Discipline Certification Requirements- 

MAT250 Statistics 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 

CHM136 General Chemistry II 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

CHM236 Organic Chemistry II OR 

BIO350 Biochemistry 

PHY 1 1 General Physics I 

ESS 1 52 Earth & Space Science 

Biology Required Courses- 

BIO150 Biology V 

BIO 152 Biology ir 

BIO200 Introduction to Scientific Research 

BIO240 Genetics 

BIO300 Ecology 

BIO330 Biology of Microorganisms 

BIO400 Senior Thesis 

BIO Biology Elective 

Pre-Professional Education Courses- 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED221 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses- 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education'' 
SE350 Secondary School Experience 



Department of Education 189 



SE351 Teaching Strategies 

SE354 Teaching Science 

SE360 ReadingAVriting across the Curriculum 

SE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience-^ 

Student Teaching Semester- "^ 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies^OR 

SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

-Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higiier. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

-'SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

"•Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

Secondary Education-Biology (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Applied Calculus 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Sociology 3 
Biology I and II ..> tv; : 8 

General Chemistry I and II 8 

Area V Distribution Requirement " * ^ 

,. . .■ ■■■:■ . ■ •;.- 36 

Sophomore Year . . ,, Credits 

Introduction to Scientific Research ",- . , ; i 3 

Genetics 4 

Physical Education 2 
Organic Chemistry I and II 

(or Organic Chemistry I and Biochemistry) 8 

Introduction to American Education 3 

General Psychology 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Instructional Technology 3 

35 

Junior Year Credits 

Ecology 4 

Biology of Microorganisms 4 



190 Programs of Study 



General Physics I and Earth/Space Science 


7 


Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. 


Ed. 


3 


Statistics 




3 


Secondary School Experience 




3 


Teaching Strategies 




3 


Free Elective 




6 


Teaching General Science 




3 
36 


Senior Year 




Credits 


Senior Thesis 




1 


Biology Elective 




4 


Community and Legal Issues in Education* 


3 


Free Electives 




6 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 




6 


ReadingAVriting across Curriculum 




1 



Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 

Practicum in Student Teaching SE412 1 

Selected Topics SE4 13 1 

Student Assistance Seminar SE3 10 (1 credit elective) 

Student Teaching SE404 OR 10 

Focused Studies SE405 

34 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education-General Science 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-General 
Science must complete all program requirements including a minimum of 125 credits, 
achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3 .0 or higher, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher 
in each of the following four Common Core courses— two English courses, the Human 
Communications course, and one math course (specific course names are specified on 
the appropriate Education worksheet). Moreover, a 2.0 or higher must be achieved in 
all remaining Common Core courses. 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-General Science: 

Discipline Certification Requirements^ 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II 
PHY 1 10 General Physics I AND 



Department of Education 191 



PHY 1 1 2 General Physics II OR 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics I AND 

PHY162 Engineering Physics II 

ESS152 Earth/Space Science 

BIO150 Biology I 

G243 Introduction to Geography 

IFS 105 Personal Productivity Computing OR 

IFS275 Information System Technology OR 

MAT230 Exploring Mathematics with the Computer 

MAT plus one mathematics course at the level of MAT17 1 or above 

Specialization Courses (six to eight credits required from one of the following areas)- 



Biology 



BIO 1 20 Field Natural History 

BIO 1 24 Intro to Oceanography 

BIO 152 Biology ir 

BIO210 Marine Biology 

BI0212 Environmental Biology 

BIO220 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 



Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

BIO240 Genetics 

BIO302 Zoology 

BIO304 Botany 

BIO308 Animal Physiology 

BIO330 Biology of Microorganisms 

BIO350 Biochemistry 



BIO370 Evolutionary Biology 



Chemistrx 



Physics 



' -.a. 



CHM202 Chemistry and Society 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

CHM236 Organic Chemistry II 

CHM336 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 

CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

CHM344 Physical Chemistry I 

CHM346 Physical Chemistry II 

CHM350 Biochemistry 



ME250 Statics 

ME252 Dynamics 

ME264 Strength of Materials 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics I 



192 Programs of Study 



PHY260 Engineering Physics 
PHY262 Engineering Physics IV 

(MAT171 and MAT 172 are required with the Physics option) 

Pre-Professional Education Courses^ 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses- 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education^ 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE351 Teaching Strategies 

SE354 Teaching General Science 

SE360 ReadingAVriting across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester^'' 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies OR 

SE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience'' 

SE4 1 2 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

'Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

^SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

"Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

'Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

Secondary Education-General Science (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Math 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Sociology or General Psychology 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 2 

Introduction to American Education _3 

34 



Department of Education 193 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Introduction to Sociology or General Psychology 3 

Instructional Technology 3 

Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Area of Specialization 6-8 

Free Electives 12 

33-35 

Junior Year Credits 

Math 3 

General Chemistry I & II 8 

Earth and Space Science 3 

Biology I ,4 

Introduction to Geography 3 

IFS105orIFS275orMAT230 3 

Secondary School Experience 3 

Teaching Strategies 3 

30 

Senior Year Credits 

Teaching Reading Writing across the Curriculum 1 

Teaching Science 3 

General Physics or Engineering Physics 8 

Math 3 

Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 
Student Teaching SE404 OR 10 

Focused Studies SE405 i o^ ; 

Practicum in Student Teaching SE4 12 , -^ 1 

Selected Topics SE413 _1^ 

31 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education-Mathematics 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-Mathematics 
must complete all program requirements including a minimum of 128 credits, 
achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher 
in each of the following four Common Core courses — two English courses, the Human 
Communications course, and one math course (specific course names are specified on 
the appropriate Education worksheet). Moreover, a 2.0 or higher must be achieved in 
all remaining Common Core courses. 



194 Programs of Study 



Required Courses in Secondary Education-IVIathematics: 

Discipline Certification Requirements- 

MAT172 Analytical Geometry and Calculus II' 

MAT230 Exploring Math with Computers 

MAT250 Elementary Statistics 

MAT260 Elementary Linear Algebra 

M AT27 1 Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 

MAT272 Differential Equations 

MAT280 Mathematical Structures 

MAT345 Modern Geometry 

MAT355 Math Standards 

MAT495 History of Mathematics 

Mathematics Elective- (Three credits from one of the following): 

MAT235, MAT350, MAT361 , MAT371 , MAT391 , MAT440, MAT470, 

MAT473, MAT477, MAT480, MAT490, MAT496 

Any one of the following science sequences' 

BIO150-152ORCHM134-136ORPHY160ANDeitherPSY162ORPHY260 
OR PHY262 

Pre-Professional Education Courses^ 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED221 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

PS Y 100 General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses^ 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education^ 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE35 1 Teaching Strategies 

SE355 Teaching Mathematics 

MAT355 Math Standards 

SE360 ReadingAVriting Across Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester-'* 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies OR 

SE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience^ 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

^Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higiier. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

'SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

"Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

''Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 



Department of Education 195 



SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 
SE413 Selected Topics 

Secondary Education-Mathematics (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Calculus I and II 8 

Information Literacy 2 

Human Communication 3 

General Psychology 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements . 6 

Physical Education 2 

Introduction to American Education _3^ 

36 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Instructional Technology 3 

Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed. 3 

Calculus III 4 

Differential Equations 4 

Exploring Math with Computers 3 

Elementary Linear Algebra 3 
BIO 1 50- 1 52 OR CHM 1 34- 1 36 OR PHY 1 60 AND 

either PS Y 1 62 OR PH Y260 OR PHY262 8 

Free Elective _3 

31 

Junior Year Credits 

Statistics . ,, 3 

Mathematical Structures 3 

Modem Geometry 3 

Secondary School Experience ' ' ' ' '■-'' 3 

Secondary Teaching Strategies 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Free Elective 3 

History of Math _3 

33 

Senior Year Credits 

Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Teaching Mathematics 3 



^Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 



196 Programs of Study 



Math Standards 1 

Mathematics Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

ReadingAVriting across Curriculum 1 

Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 12 

Student Teaching SE404 OR 
Focused Studies SE405 
Practicum in Student Teaching SE412 
Selected Topics SE4 1 3 

29 

Bachelor of Science in General Music Education 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in General Music Education must 
complete all program requirements including a minimum of 134 credits, achieve a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above, satisfy the College's residency 
requirement, and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. 
Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a 
pass/fail basis. In addition, students majoring in General Music Education must earn a 
minimum grade of 2.0 in each required music course. 

In addition, students majoring in Education must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher in 
each of the following four Common Core courses — two English courses, the Human 
Communications course, and one math course (specific course names are specified on 
the appropriate Education worksheet). Moreover, a 2.0 or higher must be achieved in 
all remaining Common Core courses. 

Required Courses in General Music: 

In addition to the Common Core, Area Distribution Requirements, Professional 
Education Courses, and a supervised Student Teaching Semester, the following music 
courses are required (See Check Sheet for specific courses in these areas): 

Historical and Theoretical Courses 

MUS 1 8 1 Foundations of Music Theory (may be exempt) 

MUS 1 82-283 Music Theory I-V 

MUS 1 84-285 Sight Singing/Ear Training I-V 

MUS290 Introduction to Music Literature 

MUS380 Ethnomusicology 

MUS390-391 Music History I-II 

MUS385 Form and Analysis 

MUS486 Orchestration and Arranging 

MUS490 Choral Conducting 

MUS491 Instrumental Conducting 

Music Education Courses 

MUS 146 Vocal Methods (Instrumentalists only) 



Department of Education 197 



MUS292 String Methods 

MUS293 Brass Methods 

MUS294 Woodwind Methods 

MUS295 Percussion Methods 

MUS298 Foreign Language Diction for Choirs (Vocalists and Pianists only)- 

MUS392 Teaching Music in the Elementary Schools 

MUS393 Teaching Music in the Secondary Schools 

Required Electives {Performance Courses) 

Primary Applied Music 7 credits 

Secondary Applied Music 2 credits 

Music Ensembles 7 credits 

Senior Recital credits 

Piano Proficiency credits 

Music Education majors must satisfy Senior Recital and Piano Proficiency Requirements 
prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 

Pre-Professional Education Courses' 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED221 Introduction to American Education (must be taken at York College) 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Learning Sec. Ed. 

G243 Intro, to Geography 

MAT See Advisor 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses' 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education-^ 

MUS392 Teaching Music/Elementary School 

MUS393 Teaching Music/Secondary School 

SE360 Reading and Writing across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester''^ 



EE/SE404 
EE/SE405 
EE/SE416 
EE/SE412 

EE/SE413 



Student Teaching 

Focused Studies OR 

Directed Professional Educational Experience^ 

Practicum in Student Teaching 

Selected Topics 



'The 2.0 also includes all courses in field of major study. 

^Required for Voice and Piano majors. Instrumental majors choose another 3 credit music elective. 

^SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

""Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

^Taken as an option to EE/SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

''Grades earned in these courses must be 3.0 or higher; all others must be 2.0 or higher. 



198 Programs of Study 



General Music Education (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to American Education 3 

Foundations to Music Theory (may be exempt) 3 

Music Theory I 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training I 1 

Introduction to Music Literature 3 

Foreign Language Diction OR Vocal Methods 1 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Secondary Applied Music 1 

Music Ensemble 2 

36 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

General Psychology 3 

Math (see advisor)' 3 

Physical Education 2 

Music Theory II, III 6 

Sight Singing and Ear Training II, III 2 

Music History I, II 6 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Secondary Applied Music 1 

Music Ensemble 2 

36 

Junior Year Credits 

Instructional Technology 3 

Music Theory IV 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training IV 

String Methods 

Brass Methods 

Woodwind Methods 

Percussion Methods 

Teaching Music in the Elementary School 3 

Teaching Music in the Secondary School 3 



Department of Education 199 



Form and Analysis 


3 


Orchestration and Arranging 


3 


Ethnomusicology 


3 


Ciioral Conducting 


3 


Instrumental Conducting 


3 




32 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Area III Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Community and Legal Issues in Education* 


3 


Reading across the Curriculum 


1 


Psychology of Teaching 


3 


Primary Applied Music 


1 


Senior Recital ' 





Music Ensemble 


1 


Student Teaching (K-12) OR 




Focused Studies 


10 


Practicum in Student Teaching 


1 


Selected Topics in Education 


1 




30 



♦Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester 

Bachelor of Science in Sport Management 

General Information on the Sport Management Program 
The Sport Management Program at York College of Pennsylvania is unique because 
of its comprehensive and interdisciplinary design. The Program recognizes the 
varied career opportunities in the field of sport and prepares students by requiring 
them to take 14 courses reflective of the breadth of the sport management field. The 
Program also requires a nine-credit work experience and the completion of an elective 
sequence in an additional academic discipline. These elective sequences include 
Accounting, Aquatic Facility Management, Asset Protection, Athletic Administration, 
Entrepreneurial Studies, Human Resource Management, Information Systems, 
Management, Organizational Development, Marketing, Operations Management, 
Public Relations, Retailing, Applied Youth Development, Hospitality Marketing, 
International Business, Leadership and Organizational Development, Legal Studies, 
Marketing Communications, Marketing Management, and Speech Communication, 
as well as a student-initiated sequence. 

The Sport Management faculty consists of experienced practitioners and 
researchers in the field of sport management who take great pride in offering informative 
and challenging classroom experiences. The faculty's vast network of professional 
contacts allows for numerous sites for work experiences. 



200 Programs of Study 



Mission of the Sport Management Major 

The mission of the York College of Pennsylvania Sport Management Major is to provide 
students with a positive environment, rich in academic and practical experiences, 
oriented toward developing comprehensive leadership and technical skills that are 
applicable to the diverse career opportunities in the sport management industry. 

Sport Management Program Goals 

The goals of the York College of Pennsylvania Sport Management Major are to: 

• prepare students for management positions in the various segments of the sport 
management career field; 

• provide a comprehensive sport management curriculum with elective 
sequences in other academic disciplines; 

• adhere to curricular guidelines set forth by NASPE/NASSM and COSMA for 
Undergraduate Sport Management Programs; 

• develop graduates with strong communication and organizational skills in 
preparation for the multi-faceted prospects of working with individual clients 
and large groups of interested constituents; 

• provide opportunities wherein decision-making and critical thinking skills are 
called upon thereby preparing students for the uncertainties and demands of 
real- world circumstances; 

• develop, plan, and execute sport management courses that reflect the current 
trends and professional practices in the sport management field; 

• prepare students for graduate work with a particular focus in the area of sport 
management; 

• provide practical work experiences in professional settings that are consistent 
with students' professional aspirations; 

• accommodate students from other disciplines who have an interest in taking 
courses with sport-related topics; 

• cultivate a professional network of York College graduates within the field of 
sport management for the purpose of perpetuating the growth of the program, field 
experience sites, and employment opportunities for Sport Management majors; 

• maintain a strong strategic planning component focusing on emerging trends, 
changing demands, and employment opportunities founded in an advisory board 
consisting of leading professionals in the field of sport management; and 

• become one of the top undergraduate sport management programs in the country 
by committing to excellence in every aspect of the Sport Management Program. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be considered for graduation, students majoring in Sport Management must complete 
all program requirements including a minimum of 129 credits, earn an overall GPA of 
2.0, and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used 
to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 
In addition. Sport Management majors must achieve a minimum grade of a 2.0 in all 
required courses in the Major and the student's chosen concentration. The following 



Department of Education 201 



core courses of Sport Management must be taken at York College of Pennsylvania: 
SPM105. 110, 111, 112, 113. 201, 320, 330, 340, 350, 401, 410, 420. 425. 475, and 
480. The remaining required Sport Management courses (SPMIOI. 220. 310) may 
be transferred from other institutions under the following conditions: the student has 
taken the course at an accredited institution; the student must have received a grade 
of 2.0 or better in the course. For the evaluation of credit transfer, the syllabus of 
the course must be submitted to the following instructors: SPMlOl Prof. Achtzehn. 
SPM220 Dr. Klinedinst, and SPM310 Dr. Grove. 

Incoming students will be admitted to the Major on a conditional basis. By the 
time they reach 60 credits they must have a cumulative GPA of 2.7 or higher. They 
must have taken and passed three of the following five courses with a GPA of 2.7 or 
higher. The courses are as follows: SPMlOl History & Philosophy of Sport; SPM201 
Introduction to Sport Management; SPM220 Sport in Society; SPM310 Sport 
Behavior; and SPM320 Sport Administration/Management Practices. If they have met 
these requirements, they will be fully admitted to the Sport Management Major. 

Internal transfers who have less than 60 credits will have to meet the same 
requirements as incoming students to be fully admitted into the Major. External 
transfers will be conditionally admitted to the Major upon entering the institution. 
After the first semester the student will have to achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.7 
or higher. The student must also take at a minimum SPM201 Introduction to Sport 
Management but may take any of the other above listed courses as well and complete 
them with a GPA of 2.7 or higher. 

Internal transfers who have more than 60 credits will have to meet the same 
requirements of external transfers. 

To be eligible for placement in a work experience during his or her senior year, 
the student must also achieve a 2.7 GPA. There is a stipulation that students take 
no additional coursework during the work experience semester (SPM475, SPM480). 
Should a candidate not be eligible, an alternate program may be pursued allowing the 
student to graduate with the degree in Sport Management, but without the invaluable 
and marketable experience provided by the supervised work experience. 

Required courses for the Sport Management Major: 

Common Core Requirements (16 credit hours)* 

WRT 1 02 Analytical Reading and Writing 

WRT202 Academic Writing 

CM 104 Human Communications 

IFLlOl Information Literacy 

MATH 1 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in Math 

PE Physical Education 

Area Distribution Requirements (27 credits) 

Area I Fine Arts and Humanities 
Area II Social and Behavioral Sciences 
Area III Laboratory Sciences 



202 Programs of Study 



Area IV 
Area V 



American Civilization/Government and Western Civilization 
International Studies/Foreign Language 



Sport Management Courses for Major* 

IFSIOO Information Technology Competency Exam 

IFS105 Personal Productivity Computing OR 

IFS305 Management Information Systems 

All Sport Management students are to take IFSIOO. Any student that passes IFSIOO 
would be required to take IFS305 and any student that does not successfully pass 
IFSIOO would be required to take IFS105. 

SPMlOl History /Philosophy of Sport 

SPM105 Freshmen Seminar 

SPM 1 10 Sport Management Practicum 

SPM 1 1 1 Sport Management Practicum 

SPM 1 1 2 Sport Management Practicum 

SPM 113 Sport Management Practicum 

SPM201 Introduction to Sport Management 

SPM220 Sport in Society 

SPM310 Sport Behavior 

SPM320 Sport Administration/Management Practices 

SPM330 Sport Marketing 

SPM340 Financing of Sport Operations 

SPM350 Public/Media Relations in Sport 

SPM401 Professional Development 

SPM410 Ticket Operations/Negotiations 

SPM420 Facility /Event Management 

SPM425 Legal Aspects of Sport 

SPM475 Ethics/Current Issues in Sport 

SPM480 Work Experience in Sport Management 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 

BIO 11 2 Fundamentals of Human Biology (Area III) 

ECO200 Macro Economics 

MGT250 Principles of Management 

MKT200 Principles of Marketing 



*2.0 or better grade required. 



Elective Sequence Courses (11-18 credits) to be chosen from the following areas: 

Accounting 

Aquatic Facility Management 

Asset Protection 

Athletic Administration 

Entrepreneurial Studies 

Hospitality Marketing 



Department of Education 203 



Human Resource Management 

Information Systems 

International Business 

Leadership and Organizational Development 

Legal Studies 

Management 

Marketing 

Marketing Communications 

Marketing Management 

Operations Management 

Organizational Development 

Public Relations 

Retailing 

Speech Communication 

Student Initiated 

Sport Management (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year (Fall) Credits 
History and Philosophy of Sport OR 

Introduction to Sport Management AND 3 

Sport Management Practicum .5 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

General Psychology 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Information Literacy 2 

IT Competency Exam 

Concepts of Physical Activity 1 

Freshmen Seminar ' 1 

16.5 
' • ■ 

Freshman Year (Spring) Credits 
Introduction to Sport Management OR 

History and Philosophy of Sport AND 3 

Sport Management Practicum -5 

Academic Writing 3 

Personal Computing 3 

Principles of Management 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

PE Course Requirement 1 

16.5 

Sophomore Year (Fall) Credits 
Sport in Society OR 

Sport Behavior AND 3 

Sport Management Practicum -5 



204 Programs of Study 



Principles of Marketing 3 

Principles of Economics: Macro 3 

Human Communication 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

15.5 

Sophomore Year (Spring) Credits 

Financing Sport Operations OR 3 
Sport Behavior AND 

Sport in Society AND 3 

Sport Management Practicum .5 

Financial Accounting 3 

Free Elective 3 

Concentration Course 3 

PE Course Requirement 1 

16.5 

Junior Year (Fall) Credits 

Administration and Management Practices AND 3 
Sport Marketing OR 

Financing Sport Operations AND 3 

Fundamentals of Human Biology 3 

Free Elective 3 

Concentration Course 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement _3^ 

' 18 

Junior Year (Spring) Credits 

Public and Media Relations in Sport AND 3 

Facility and Event Management AND 3 

Free Elective 3 

Concentration Course 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement _3 

18 

Senior Year (Fall) Credits 

Legal Aspects of Sport AND 3 

Concentration Course 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Ticket Operations/Negotiation 3 

Professional Development _\^ 

16 



Department of Education 205 



Senior Year (Spring) Credits 

Ethics and Current Issues in Sport AND 3 

Work Experience 9 

l2 

DEPARTMENTAL MINORS 

Minor in Special Education 

Credits 
PS Y227 Psychology of Exceptional Children 3 

PSY364 Educational Testing 3 

SPE205 ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorders 3 

SPE302 Assistive Technology 2 

SPE333 Specific Learning Disabilities 3 

SPE340 Behavioral Design and Intervention 3 

17 




DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND HUMANITIES 



^^ he Department of English and Humanities offers baccalaureate degree programs in 
a! English Literary Studies, Professional Writing, Theatre, Philosophy, and Spanish. In 
conjunction with the Department of Education, it offers Secondary Education-Enghsh, 
which qualifies majors for Pennsylvania certification to teach English in secondary schools. 
Additionally, the department offers minors in each of its baccalaureate degree programs as 
well as in Creative Writing, Film Studies, Religious Studies, French, and German. 

In an increasingly global environment where the ebb and flow of information courses 
instantaneously around the world, the disciplines devoted to the human word, to human 
communication, to the world's languages and literatures, its philosophies and religions 
and cultures remain vital. It is the mission of the Department of English and Humanities 
to prepare its students to interface with this global information society by providing them 
with the critical, questioning, imaginative, and interpretive abilities they will need to 
succeed as students and in their chosen career paths. 

Pursuing a major in the Department of English and Humanities provides students with 
an opportunity to develop an awareness of foreign language and culture, the rhetorical 
dimension of language and the media, text performance and presentation, philosophical 
and religious analysis. The Department's goal is to provide the active learning experiences 
that promote the development of higher-level reading and analytical abilities and the 
refinement of oral and written skills. Majors in the Department leam to ask questions, 
think critically, analyze data, synthesize information, and communicate ideas effectively. 
Disciplines represented here encourage versatility, flexibility, and the ability to leam 
new concepts. These programs are designed to prepare students for careers requiring 
analytical, presentational, and communication skills, and pre-professional preparation for 
a variety of positions in publishing, law, state and federal service, commerce, and graduate 
education. 

Majors in the Department of Enghsh and Humanities accept the invitation to intellectual 
adventure and self-exploration, thus developing the skills and acquiring the knowledge 
essential for understanding tomorrow's challenges. 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Literary Studies 

The study of English is one of the most wholly useful and enjoyable programs a student 
can pursue in higher education. Students who earn a bachelor's degree in English 
Literary Studies will have armed themselves with the skills and knowledge to analyze 
and appreciate recent and historical literature from all over the world, to become a more 
involved, active, and intelligent reader and writer. They will begin to harbor a deeper, 
more conscious understanding of culture as it is represented and magnified by works 
of literature, to hone their arguments and communication skills, and to think critically 
and logically. Also, they will learn to express themselves clearly and coherently in both 
writing and discussion. The English Literary Studies Major focuses on developing a 
core set of competencies while choosing elective literature courses in four key literary 
modes. 

Apart from the inherent rewards of studying literature and language, a degree in 
English Literary Studies offers intensive training in skills essential in the modem job 



206 



Department of English and Humanities 207 



market, training that is rarely offered by other fields of study. Students of literature 
develop an ability to think clearly, to analyze complex problems, to sift the essential 
from the non-important, to focus on details without losing sight of the whole picture, 
to perform research, to evaluate evidence, to find new and creative ways to address 
old problems, and to express the results of your analysis in effective language — these 
are skills vital to genuine achievement in nearly every profession. People who graduate 
with an English degree usually go on to careers in law. public relations, advertising, 
publishing, and business management . A degree in English Literary Studies also prepares 
students for graduate study in literature and the humanities. 

The English Literar\' Studies major is organized according to four disciplinary modes 
of inquiry: 

History and Culture (9 credits): 

Courses in the "history/culture" mode begin from the concept that all texts are situated 
in social, historical, philosophical, and political contexts. As such, these courses will 
treat the literary text not only as an aesthetic object, but also as an artifact of the culture 
from which it was created. Students will be asked to consider, and to write about, the 
ways that art and its surrounding historical and cultural elements interact with one 
another. 

Figure Autlior (6 credits): 

Courses in the "figure author" mode provide in-depth study of a single author or 
muhiple authors. The course may examine the influence of biography on the author's 
work, the author as an emblem or anomaly of a particular historical period, or the 
author's relationship to some aspect of the literary tradition. 

Thematics/Ttieory (6 credits): 

Courses in the "thematics/theory" mode have two configurations. A "thematics" course 
approaches literature through a unifying theme, issue, description, or problem relevant 
to the current study of literature. A "theory" course also may include the above and 
offer a sustained approach to literary texts from a critical perspective or perspectives 
(new historicist, structuralist, feminist, psychoanalytic, poststructurahst, etc.) or take 
"theory" or a selection of theories as its object of study. 

Genre (6 credits): 

Courses in the "genre" mode identify texts as a "kind" or "type" of writing — epics, 
lyric poetry, novels, autobiography, letters, and drama. But more than just aesthetic 
categories chosen by authors, genre also determines the types of reading strategies 
that we need as readers to interpret those works. Courses in this category will focus 
students' studies on achieving a deeper understanding of either a single genre or a 
group of genres, and then will ask them to use that knowledge as a tool for interpreting 
texts. They may also ask students to consider the uses of particular genres as markers 
of particular moments in literary and socio-cultural history. 



208 Programs of Study 



Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in English Literary Studies must 
complete a minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0, satisfy the College's residency requirement, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. In addition, English Literary 
Studies majors must complete two semesters of one foreign language. 

The requirements of tfie Engiish Literary Studies major are:* 

Each of the following (15 credits): 

LIT228 Foundations of English and Humanities 

LIT210 Studies in Criticism and Theory 

LIT310 Language and Linguistics 

WRT3 1 5 Advanced Composition 

LIT401 English Seminar 

Literature Modes (27 credits)** 

History/Culture (nine credits from the following): 

LIT203 African- American Literature 

LIT281 American Literature to 1885 

LIT282 American Literature after 1885 

LIT283 British Literature to 1750 

LIT284 British Literature after 1750 

LIT285 European Literature to 1 600 

LIT286 European Literature since 1600 

LIT322 Nineteenth-Century Novel 

LIT326 Twentieth-Century British Literature 

LIT384 Harlem Renaissance 



Genre (six credits from the following) : 



LIT270 
LIT291 
LIT313 
LIT327 
LIT343 
LIT360/THE360 
LIT361/THE361 
LIT376 
LIT391 



Young Adult Literature 
The Short Story 
The American Novel 
Twentieth Century Novel 
The Experience of Poetry 
History of Theatre I 
History of Theatre II 
Contemporary Poetry 
Literature of Terror 



♦Students must receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in each course within the major. 

**Students are permitted to take no more than one THE or FLM course per Literary Mode, upon approval by the 

Department. 



Department of English and Humanities 209 



LIT393/FLM393 
LIT395 
LIT398 

LIT416/THE416 



Literature and Film 

Fantasy Literature 

Early Modem Religious Genres 

Modem Drama 



Figure/Author (six credits from the following): 
LIT323 Shakespeare I 



Li 1 314- J>nakespeare ii 
LIT375 James Joyce 


LIT380 Major Authors and Literary Traditions 


LIT381 Don Nig 


ro 


LIT388 Mallory 




LIT394 Samuel Beckett 


LIT396 Jane Austen 


LIT397 Kafka 




Thematics/Theory (six 


credits fi-om the following): 


LIT341 


The Comic Tradition 


L1T342 


Popular Literature 


LIT344AVGS344 


Love and Sex in Literature 


LIT346 


Literature and Society 


LIT347 


Literature and Psychology 


LIT378AVGS378 


Gay/Lesbian Literature 


LIT381 


Literary Theory 


LIT382AVGS382 


Women in Literature 


LIT385 


British Modernism 


LIT386 


Literary Philosophers 


LIT387 


Women's Writing and Resistance 


LIT389 


Postcolonial Theory 


LIT390 


The Bible as Literature 


LIT391 


Literature of Terror 



Required Supporting Courses (nine Credits) 

Choose from PHL, REL, FLM, and THE courses at the 300 level or higher. Free 

Electives (25-27 credits) 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Philosophy 

Students pursuing a major in Philosophy critically study the abiding questions facing 
humankind: What is the nature of God? Why be moral? Is there an afterlife? What 
is beauty? What is tmth? What is justice? What does it mean to know? The study 
of philosophy develops analytical, critical, and interpretive abilities, cultivating 
a student's capacities for reflection and self-expression. Students majoring in 
Philosophy develop a comprehensive knowledge of the history of philosophy and 
the representative philosophical problems and issues of the discipline. The study of 



210 Programs of Study 



philosophy further enhances the student's capacity to apply philosophical methods to 
intellectual problems across academic fields of study. 

The study of philosophy is excellent preparation for careers that demand careful 
reading, critical thinking, and decision-making abilities. A major in Philosophy 
pro-ivides a solid foundation for students planning careers in medicine, law, education, 
and business. Philosophy majors are among the top performers on the Law School 
Aptitude Test and the Medical College Aptitude Test. Philosophy majors also 
succeed in executive and management sectors of business that require the ability to 
assimilate information, analyze situations, and produce effective solutions to complex 
problems. 

Requirements For Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Philosophy must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. In addition. Philosophy majors must complete two semesters 
of one foreign language. 

The requirements of the Philosophy Major are:* 

Required courses (27 credits) 

PHL221 Introduction to Philosophy 

PHL231 Logic 

PHL235 Ancient to Modern Philosophy 

PHL236 The Enlightenment to Postmodern Philosophy 

PHL321 Epistemology 

PHL331 Metaphysics 

PHL341 Ethics 

PHL401 Philosophy Seminar 

REL265 World Religions 

Required Electives (18 credits) 

Students must complete 18 elective credits in Philosophy. At least nine credits must be 
at the 300 level or above. Up to nine credits may be REL courses. 

Free Electives (31-33 credits) 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Professional Writing 

A major in Professional Writing combines the broad-based liberal arts education 
offered by all programs in the English and Humanities Department with the practical 
skills and career opportunities that can lead to a fulfilling and successful future. The 
major in Professional Writing is excellent preparation for students interested in work as 
writers, editors, and web designers. Graduates have obtained positions in publishing, 



Department of English and Humanities 21 1 



technical writing, public relations, government and non-governmental organizations 
(NGOs). corporate communications, non-profit and social-service organizations, 
health care, the arts, and many related fields. This major is also among the most valued 
courses of study for those interested in post-graduate education in law. English or 
rhetoric, technical writing, or toward the masters of fine arts degree in creative writing. 
When combined with the Department's Creative Writing minor, the major can also be 
useful for those who are interested in writing fiction, non-fiction, poetry, or drama. 

The major provides students with guided experience in a wide range of writing 
situations and stylistic options. Students with this major will benefit from: 

• Marketable communication skills such as editing, electronic communication 
(including webpage design), and collaborative writing 

• Real-world learning through internship experiences in professional writing 

• Numerous courses in varied geiues of creative writing 

• An electronic portfolio of written work that can be used in your search for work 
as a professional writer or as a venue for publishing creative writing or obtaining 
a literary agent 

• Background in the history and theory of language usage 

Requirements For Graduation: 

The courses for the major in Professional Writing are designed to give students a broad 
base of writing skills. Courses are organized into five general categories: 

• Courses in language and rhetorical theory 

• Courses in practical application of writing skills, including courses that focus 
upon topics such as medical writing, nature writing, poetry and fiction writing, 
document design, political speech, the personal essay, and so forth 

• Courses giving students hands-on career skills and experience 

• Courses in a minor field of study related to their career aspirations, and 

• Foundation courses in the liberal arts 

To be eligible for graduation. Professional Writing majors must complete 124 credits, 
distributed as follows: 

1 . Common Core: 1 6 credits of course work, required of all York College students 
and designed to hone the skills necessary for success in college*; 

2. Area Distribution Requirements: 30-32 credits of courses that are required of all 
York College students in order to provide a broad-based liberal education**; 

3. Elective Courses: 13-18 credits of free electives, to be chosen in consultation 
with an advisor, and which allow students to learn about other areas of special 
interest; 

4. Required Major courses: 33 credits of writing and other humanities courses, 
designed to provide students with a solid background in various writing 
techniques, styles, and applications, including:*** 

WRT210 Writing in Professional Cultures 
WRT225 Interdisciplinary Writing 



212 Programs of Study 



WRT305 Rhetorical Theory 

LIT310 Language and Linguistics 

WRT315 Advanced Composition 

WRT320 Writing for the Web 

WRT410 Professional Editing 

WRT450 Experiential Learning (on-site work experience as a 

professional communicator)**** 

WRT480 Senior Seminar in Professional Writing 

PLUS six credits of Writing Electives, chosen from the following*****: 



WRT275 
WRT290 
WRT310 
WRT312 
WRT360-WRT369 

WRT371 
WRT373 
WRT374 
WRT377 
WRT380 
WRT451 

WRT452 
WRT460-WRT469 

WRT498,WRT499 



Playwriting 

Teaching and Tutoring of Writing I 

Creative Writing 

Writing Humor 

A variety of intermediate level Special Topics courses 

in Professional Writing 

Advanced Creative Writing 

Advanced Non-Fiction 

Writing Children's Literature 

Screenwriting 

Freelance Writing for the Marketplace 

Experiential Learning (optional addition to required 

internship, WRT450) 

Teaching and Tutoring Writing II 

A variety of advanced Special Topics courses in 

Professional Writing 

Independent Study in Writing 



English and Humanities Electives: 12 credits beyond the required courses 
above, chosen from the various offerings of the English and Humanities 
Department in Literature, Professional Writing, Creative Writing, Philosophy, 
Humanities. Theater, Film Studies, Women and Gender Studies, Religious 
Studies, or Foreign Language. All courses must be at the 200 level or above, 
at least three credits must be at the 300 level or above, and at least six credits 
of the 12 must be in LIT. 



*Students must receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in all Common Core classes to qualify for graduation. 

**Students must complete at least six credits of a single foreign language. 

***Students must receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in all required major courses, writing electives, and English/ 

Humanities electives to qualify for graduation. 

****In order to enroll in WRT450 or WRT45 1 , students must: develop a clear set of objectives and goals for the 

experience, in consultation with a faculty member; file an application with the experiential learning instructor six 

months prior to intended on-site experience (including a statement of objectives and goals): gain acceptance as an 

intern by an approved site; and have achieved a GPA of 2.75 or higher and have completed 60 credit hours by the 

beginning of the internship experience. 

*****With approval of advisor and Writing Program Administrator, a student may substitute writing intensive 

courses in other disciplines (such as Print Media Writing or Grant Writing) as writing electives, when those 

courses serve that student's academic and career objectives. 



Department of English and Humanities 213 



6. Minor: All Professional Writing majors are required to complete a minor in a 
field related to their career interests. Chosen in consultation with an advisor, 
the minor allows students to devote focused study to an area within which 
they may pursue work as a writer. For example, a student interested in writing 
for industry might minor in Business, a student interested in journalism might 
minor in a Communications field, a student interested in working in web 
or publication design might minor in Visual Communications, a student 
interested in writing for a social service organization might minor in Human 
Services, and a student interested in law school might minor in Political 
Science or Philosophy. 

Though every student will customize his or her educational program 
with the help of a Professional Writing advisor, the sequence of courses 
suggested below can help students to plan class scheduling with an eye to 
future semesters. This outline can also help students to schedule classes 
that form prerequisites for more advanced courses early in their program of 
studies. It is especially important that students enroll in WRT210, WRT225, 
and WRT3 1 5 within the first two years, or as early as possible, since they are 
foundation courses for many upper-division courses. It is also important that 
students plan ahead for their internship(s), to assure securing a site that will 
best serve their career interests. Advisors are always ready to help students 
develop a clear plan. 

Professional Writing (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Area V Distribution Requirement (Foreign Language) 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3 

English/Humanities Electives ^ . 6 

Free Elective Courses _6 

32 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Writing in Professional Cultures 3 

Interdisciplinary Writing 3 

Advanced Composition 3 

Human Communication 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 



214 Programs of Study 



Area V Distribution Requirement (Foreign Language) 3 

Begin courses for Minor Field 3 

Physical Education 1 

31-33 

Junior Year Credits 

Writing for the Web 3 

Language and Linguistics 3 

Rhetorical Theory 3 

Experiential Learning ( 1 st or 2nd semester junior year) 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1 

English/Humanities elective 3 

Continue courses for Minor Field 9 

31-32 

Senior Year Credits 

Professional Editing 3 

Senior Seminar in Professional Writing 3 
Writing Electives (one course may be optional second 
Experiential learning course/Internship or Independent Study) 6 

English/Humanities elective 3 

Complete Remaining Courses for minor field of study 6 

Free Electives "■ 9 



30 



Bachelor of Arts Degree in Secondary Education-English 



The Secondary Education-English program is designed to prepare students for a 
career in teaching English at the secondary school level. The program includes 
coursework in the following areas: General Education requirements, English and 
Humanities Department requirements, specialization courses or English elective 
courses, professional preparation courses, and a professional semester of student 
teaching. This program provides instruction and practical experiences in determining 
effective instructional approaches in the teaching of particular components of the 
secondary school curriculum: language study, reading, literature, writing, listening, 
and speaking. Students develop an awareness of the many responsibilities faced by 
secondary English teachers and learn how to work within today's school environment 
to improve instructional effectiveness and efficiency. The Education courses focus on 
the effectiveness of the teacher's methods and on the value of the students' learning 
experiences. 

Coursework for the Secondary Education-English program emphasizes study of 
literature, writing, language and linguistics, and drama or film. It includes twelve credit 



Department of English and Humanities 215 



hours of English electives, with two courses chosen from Hterature. one of which must 
be muhicultural. 

Students must apply for admission into the teacher education program according to 
the Education Department's guidelines. In addition, students must complete 150 hours 
of field experience and pass the PPST or C-PPST Reading, Writing, and Mathematics 
PRAXIS exams and the English PRAXIS exam. (See Department of Education for a 
complete description of teacher preparation requirements.) 

Requirements For Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation and certification with a Pennsylvania teaching certificate, 
students majoring in Secondary Education-English must complete a minimum of 
125 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, satisfy the College's 
residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements of the 
College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken 
on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to 
begin the Student Teaching Semester, and must achieve a grade of 3.0 or higher in each 
of WRT 1 02 , WRT202 , CM 1 04 , MAT 1 1 1 , a second math course , and ED22 1 . Students 
must pass all remaining Core courses with a 2.0 or higher and may not take any of the 
courses offered by the Department on a pass/fail basis. 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-English: 

Discipline Certification Requirements 

LIT200 Perspectives on Literature 

THE205 Text Performance 

THE254 Introduction to Theatre OR 

FLM216 Introduction to Film 

LIT281 American Literature to 1885' OR 

LIT282 American Literature after 1885' .. 

LIT283 British Literature to 1750' OR 

LIT284 British Literature after 1750' 

LIT310 Language and Linguistics 

WRT3 1 5 Advanced Composition 

LIT323 Shakespeare P OR 

LIT324 Shakespeare IF 

English Electives (12 credits in ELM, LIT, THE, or WRT required including at least 
three credits of LIT and one of the following three-credit multicultural literature 
courses)^ 

LIT203 African-American Literature 

LIT285 European Literature to 1600 

LIT286 European Literature since 1 600 

LIT291 Short Story 

LIT346 Literature and Society 



216 Programs of Study 



LIT347 Literature and Psychology 

LIT416 Modem Drama 

Professional Preparation Courses- 

Mathematics (See advisor) 

PS Y 1 00 General Psychology ' 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology' 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed. 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED221 Introduction to American Education 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education^ 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE351 Teaching Strategies 

SE353 Teaching Communication 

SE360 Reading and Writing across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester^ 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies'^ 

SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics in Education 

SE416 Directed Professional Education Experience^ 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

-Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

^SE402 must be scheduled the academic term immediately prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 

■"Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

^Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

Secondary Education-English (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

General Psychology 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Mathematics 3 

Physical Education _\^ 

33 



Department of English and Humanities 217 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Human Communication 3 

Introduction to American Education 3 

Instructional Technology 3 

Psychology of Teaching/Secondary Education 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 

Perspectives on Literature 3 

American Literature 3 

English Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 

Free Electives 3 

31-33 

Junior Year Credits 

Introduction to Theatre or Film 3 

Advanced Composition 3 

British Literature 3 

Language and Linguistics 3 

Text Performance 3 

English Elective 3 

Secondary School Experience 3 

Teaching Strategies 3 

Free Electives _7 

31 

Senior Year Credits 

English Electives 6 

Shakespeare I or II 3 

Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Teaching Communication 3 

ReadingAVriting Across Curriculum 3 

Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 12 

Student Teaching OR 

Focused Studies 

Practicum in Student Teaching 

Selected Topics 

Teaching Exceptional/Multicultural Students 

30 



*Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Spanish 

The Spanish major at York College is an applied language major that allows the 



218 Programs of Study 



student the opportunity to become proficient in the language and to select an area 
of concentration from a wide range of disciplines. This curriculum recognizes the 
increasing demand in practically every work setting for individuals who are competent 
in Spanish. The primary emphasis in this major is the acquisition of Spanish language 
proficiency, the appreciation of Spanish and Spanish- American literature, and the 
understanding of the many cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The secondary 
emphasis is on applying this knowledge by choosing a minor in which the student 
plans to use Spanish in the future. Students may also choose to pursue a double major 
by combining Spanish with another field. Through their choices in courses, Spanish 
majors have the flexibility to construct a unique program that best suits their needs 
and interests. 

Students are required to complete an independent research project or participate 
in an internship that serves as a capstone experience in the major. The study abroad 
requirement is an essential component to experiencing the Spanish language and 
Hispanic culture firsthand. While a full semester abroad is recommended, participation 
in a brief, intensive immersion program abroad is also an option. One study abroad 
option available is the Mini-Mester in Mexico, through which students may earn 
Spanish elective credits by participating in intensive Spanish language study at an 
established language institute in Cuernavaca, Mexico. 

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the major, the career direction of graduates 
from this program varies considerably. Students may wish to pursue graduate studies 
or enter a career in international relations, social services, public relations, business, 
or education, just to name a few. 

Requirements For Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Spanish must complete a minimum 
of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the College's 
residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements of the 
College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken 
on a pass/fail basis. 

Spanish majors must complete at least six elective credits in Spanish in an approved 
study abroad program in a Spanish-speaking country. 

The requirements of the Spanish Major are:* 

SPN20 1 Intermediate Spanish I 

SPN202 Intermediate Spanish II 

SPN205 Intermediate Conversational Spanish 

SPN206 Reading Strategies in Spanish 

SPN301 Adv. OralAVritten Spanish 

SPN307 Spanish Culture and Civilization 

SPN308 Spanish American Culture and Civilization 

SPN3 1 5 Introduction to Literature of Spain 



♦Students must receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in each course in the major. 



Department of English and Humanities 219 



SPN3 1 6 Introduction to Literature of Spanish America 

SPN420 Advanced Spanish Grammar 

SPN425 Spanish Linguistics 

SPN498/499 Independent Research OR 

SPN450 Internship in Spanish 

Group II: Spanish Electives (nine credits) Students must complete at least six of the 
nine elective Spanish credits in an approved program of study abroad. These need 
not be completed in the same semester or in the same program. The remaining three 
credits may be completed on campus. 

Group III: Minor Electives (18 credits) The student will complete the requirements for 
a minor of his/her choice. If the student has chosen to double major, requirements of 
the minor will be satisfied in this area by that major's requirements. 

Free Electives (19-21 credits) 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Theatre 

With a major in Theatre, students will learn how to write and analyze texts and 
documents , solve problems quickly and effectively, speak energetically and dramatically 
to audiences of all kinds and sizes, and contribute significantly to any group or team. A 
background in theatre prepares students for careers in sales, management, marketing, 
advertising, education, law, and public policy, to name a few possibilities. Theatre 
majors offer to prospective employers the valuable skills of creativity, imagination, 
independence of thought and action, patience, self-discipline, flexibility, initiative, 
teamwork, and dedication. Theatre majors' energy, enthusiasm, strong work ethic, self- 
confidence, versatility, responsibility, and commitment identify them as well-rounded 
liberal arts graduates who can speak articulately, give confident presentations, and 
thrive under pressure. Careers in professional theatre are always possible, of course, 
but even if those dreams do not materialize, the Theatre Major prepares students to 
compete happily for a wide variety of opportunities and provides them with a college 
experience full of fun, great friends, excitements, challenges, and satisfactions. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Theatre must complete a minimum 
of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the College's 
residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements of the 
College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken 
on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, the Theatre major must complete two semesters of one foreign 
language. 

Theatre Major Requirements (64 credits): 

Theatre Performance and Production (34 credits) 
THE205 Text Performance 



220 Programs of Study 



THE254 Intro to Theatre 

THE220 Theatre Construction 

THE221 Theatre Technology 

THE262 Acting 

THE320 Scene Design 

THE321 Lighting Design 

THE322 Costume Design 

THE350-353 Theatre Practicum 

THE355 Advanced Acting 

THE498 Independent Study: Directing 

OR 

THE499 Independent Study 

Dramatic Literature (2 1 credits) 

LIT210 Studies in Criticism and Theory 



THE360 
THE361 
THE380 
THE410 
THE415 
THE/LIT416 



History of Theatre I 
History of Theatre II 
Special Topics in Theatre 
Western Theatre 
Non-Western Theatre 
Modern Drama 



Major Area Electives (nine credits) 

Three courses above the 100 level from department offerings in FLM, LIT, HUM, or 
THEAVRT275. ■ 

Free Electives (15 credits) 

DEPARTMENTAL MINORS 

The English and Humanities Department offers minors in Literary Studies, Theatre, 
Professional Writing, Creative Writing, Film Studies, Philosophy, Religious Studies, as 
well as French, German, and Spanish. Through careful planning and advising, students 
representing a variety of majors may elect a minor in these areas, thus acquiring 
valuable skills that will enhance their background, regardless of their primary fields 
of study. 



Creative Writing 

WRT210 
WRT315 
WRT310 



Writing in Professional Cultures 
Advanced Composition 
Creative Writing 



Nine WRT elective credits beyond WRT102 and WRT202 from a variety of Creative 
Writing courses. 



Department of English and Humanities 221 



Film Studies Minor 

FLM216 Introduction to Film 
FLM220 History ot Film 

An additional 12 credits selected from FLM courses and LIT393. WRT377, PHL395, 
H486. and MUS245. At least six of these credits must be at the 300 level. 

French 

French courses beyond elementary level, at least 6 credits of which must be 300 level 
and include a literature course. 

German 

18 credit hours of German beyond the elementary level, at least six credits of which 
must be 300 level or above and include a literature class. 

Literary Studies 

LIT210 or LIT228 is required. The remaining five courses must be LIT courses; at 
least two of these must be 300 level or higher. 

Philosophy 

PHL22 1 Introduction to Philosophy OR 

PHL226 History of Western Philosophy 

PHL222 Critical Thinking OR 

PHL23 1 Logic 

A course in Ethics (PHL223. PHL240, PHL341, PHL350) nine additional credits in 
Philosophy 

(At least six of the 18 credits must be at the 300 level or higher.) 

Professional Writing 

WRT225 Interdisciplinary Writing 
WRT210 Writing in Professional Cultures 
WRT315 Advanced Composition 

Nine elective credits selected from WRT courses beyond WRT102 and WRT202. At 
least three WRT elective credits must be at the 300 level or above. 

Religious Studies 

REL265 World Religions 

REL270 Tradition and Culture of Judaism 

REL275 Tradition and Culture of Christianity 

Nine additional credits in Religious Studies courses [which could include PHL383 
Philosophy of Religion, HUM242 Science and Religion, and a course in Ethics 



222 Programs of Study 



(PHL223, PHL240, PHL341, PHL350)] 

(At least six of the 18 credits must be at the 300 level of higher.) 

Spanish 

18 credit hours of Spanish beyond the Elementary level, at least six credits of which 
must be at the 300 level or above and include a literature class. 

Theatre 

A minor in Theatre requires 18 credits with the following distribution: 

THE205 Text Performance 
THE254 Introduction to Theatre 

Twelve credit hours from the following: 

THE262 Acting 

THE220 Theatre Construction 

THE22 1 Theatre Technology 

THE320 Scene Design 

THE321 Lighting Design 

THE322 Costume Design 

THE350-3 Theatre Practicum 

THE355 Advanced Acting 

THE360 History of Theatre I 

THE36 1 History of Theatre II 

THE380 Special Topics in Theatre 

THE410 Western Theatre 

THE4 1 5 Non-Western Theatre 






DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 
AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



The Department of History and Political Science offers baccalaureate degree 
programs in History. Political Science, International Relations, and Secondary 
Education-Social Studies. The Department is committed to scholarly and teaching 
excellence in order to prepare students for success in a wide variety of careers in 
government, public history, education, law. lobbying, public service, advocacy, 
journalism, business, management, and administration as well as for graduate 
and professional study in many areas, including law school. The Department also 
offers minors in African and African- American Studies. American History. World 
History, Geography. Legal Studies. Political Science. Public Administration, and 
International Studies. The Department also works with the Education Department to 
prepare students for careers in secondary education. 

The Department offers a rich selection of courses to support the College's General 
Education program and to offer both breadth and depth for its majors. It is able to 
offer all students the opportunity to develop a global perspective that brings together 
the past and the present in order to understand the complexity, diversity, and inter- 
relatedness of the world. 

A wide variety of extracurricular activities and programs are sponsored by the 
Department. These include a student journal. Past and Present, which showcases 
student writing and research, chapters of national honor societies in History (Phi 
Alpha Theta) and Political Science (Pi Sigma Alpha), and many opportunities for 
independent research and internships in a variety of settings. Students may also 
compete for a variety of awards to support independent research and to recognize 
academic excellence. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in History 

This curriculum is built on the premise that knowledge about the past provides us, 
collectively and individually, with a better sense of who we are and where we are head- 
ing. The study of history sharpens our skills as thinkers and writers, and it prepares us 
for a variety of roles in our lives. In addition to traditional courses of study, students 
majoring in History are afforded opportunities in oral history, public history, and a 
wide spectrum of internship experiences in museums and historic sites. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in History must complete a minimum 
of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in history must maintain a 2.0 grade point average 
in the course requirements of the major and receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in all 
History courses. 



223 



224 Programs of Study 



Required Courses in History Major (54 credits): 

Core Courses (18 credits) 

H219 History of Western Civilization 1 

H220 History of Western Civilization II 

H221 American Civilization I 

H222 American Civilization II 

H240 Methods and Theory in History 

H440 Senior Seminar in History 

Required Electives (18 credits) 

Students majoring in history must complete six upper-division history courses 

Support Courses (18 credits) 

Students must choose six courses from any of the following areas: 

Fine Arts & Humanities 

International Studies 

Social & Behavioral Sciences (including Anthropology, Geography, History, 
Political Science, Psychology, Sociology) 

Elective Courses 

Students majoring in History must complete an additional 28 - 30 credits of free 
electives. 

International Studies/Foreign Language 

Six credits are to be taken in one of these two areas. The foreign language option 
is encouraged, especially for those students considering graduate study. If foreign 
language is elected, six credits must be in one language. 

History (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving in Mathematics 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 

History of Western Civilization I & II 6 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

32-34 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

History of American Civilization I & II 6 

Methods and Theory in History 3 



Department of History and Political Science 225 



Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Support Courses 9 

Elective Course 3 

Physical Education 2 

32 

Junior Year Credits 

History Electives 9 

Elective Courses 9 

Support Courses 9 

Human Communication 3 

30 

Senior Year Credits 

History Electives ' 9 

Elective Courses 18 

History Seminar 3 

30 

Bachelors of Arts Degree in International Relations 

The International Relations Major emphasizes the understanding of global issues and 
world cultures, and traces the political, social, ideological, and economic history of 
the world. This major addresses the idea of globalization as well as the challenges and 
opportunities present in a closely integrated world. Students graduating with a major 
in International Relations will be able to: 

• Understand the major analytical perspectives and key concepts used by 
scholars to study international relations; 

• Use the theoretical literature to analyze global issues and problems; and 

• Engage in a discussion of the complex issues and developments that drive and 
define contemporary global politics. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in International Relations must 
complete a minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 
2.0 or higher, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis, and credits earned in WRTIOO 
may not be applied to degree requirements. 

International Relations majors must be proficient in a foreign language at the 
intermediate level. Additionally they must participate in an approved study abroad 
program, other international experience or international internship approved by the 
department chair. 

In addition, students majoring in International Relations must maintain a 2.0 



226 Programs of Study 



grade point average in the course requirements of the major and receive a grade of 
2.0 or higher in all international relations core, political science electives, and support 
courses. 

Required Courses in International Relations Major (60 credits): 

International Relations Core Requirements (15 credits) 
PS260 Comparative Politics 
PS262 Scope and Methods of Political Science 
PS302 International Relations 
PS308 International Political Economy 
PS440 Senior Seminar 



Political Science Electives (27 Credits) 

Nine of the following courses. A maximum of six credits from INT courses. 

G243 Introduction to Geography 

INT 143 Introduction to Africa 

INT 144 Introduction to East Asia 

INT 145 Introduction to Latin America 

INT 146 Introduction to Mid East 

INT 147 Introduction to Russia 

INT 150 Introduction to South Asia 

PS243 Gov./Politics of Africa 

PS244 Gov./Politics of East Asia 

PS245 Gov./Politics of Latin America 

PS246 Gov./Politics of Mid East 

PS247 Gov./Politics of Russia 

PS250 Gov./Politics of South Asia 

PS 303 American Foreign Policy 

PS306 Intro to International Organizations 

PS307 International Law 

PS406 International Peace and Security 

PS47 1-478 Selected Topics 

PS474 The Arab League 

PS479/480 The European Union 

PS490/491 Internship 

PS498/499 Independent Study 

Support Courses (12 credits) 

Four of the following: 

ACC415; ANT220, 300; ART390, 391 , 394, 395; ECO400; ENT410; FIN400; FRN303, 
315,316; G243, 332, 361 ; GRM305; H219, 220, 227, 228, 303, 305, 309, 310, 318, 330, 
333, 334, 335, 340, 382, 420, 470; IBS200; LIT283, 284, 285,286, 326, 385, 389, 399; 
MGT375; MKT370; PHL235, 236, 343; REL265, 270, 275; SPN308, 315, 316. 



Department of History and Political Science 227 

Foreign Language Proficiency (six credits or equivalent) 

Foreign Language Policy 

Students majoring in International Relations must be proficient in a foreign language 
at the intermediate level. Students may indicate their attainment of this proficiency in 
one of four ways: 

1 . A student may complete a second major in a modern language, or may minor 
in a modem language. 

2. A student whose native language is not English may choose to use his/her 
native language to fulfill the language proficiency requirement in International 
Relations. 

3. Students who choose to use German. French, or Spanish to fulfill the 
proficiency requirement in International Relations must take SPN202, 
FRN202.orGRM202. 

4. Students whose native language is English, and who wish to use a modern 
language not taught at York College to fulfill the proficiency requirement in 
International Relations, may petition the department chair, who will determine 
whether the level of proficiency in that language meets the requirement. 

International Relations (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

- Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Comparative Politics 3 

International Relations 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 6 

Foreign Language _3 

32 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 2 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 

Foreign Language 3 

International Political Economy 3 

Scope and Methods of Political Science 3 

Political Science Electives 6 

32-34 



228 Programs of Study 



Junior Year Credits 

Political Science Electives 12 

Foreign Language 3 

Support Courses 6 

Elective Courses 12 

33 

Senior Year Credits 

Senior Seminar 3 

Political Science Electives 9 

Support Courses 6 

Elective Courses 12 

30/32 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science 

Political scientists study the formal and informal political processes that shape pub- 
lic policy. As a discipline, political science combines both humanistic and scientific 
perspectives in order to understand the behavior of individuals, groups, nations, and 
international organizations. The Department offers courses in all of the major fields 
of the discipline (American Government and Politics, Comparative Politics, Consti- 
tutional Law, International Relations, Political Theory, Methodology, and Public Ad- 
ministration.) 

The major is designed to provide a firm foundation in all sub-fields and to pro- 
vide sufficient flexibility for students to pursue their own intellectual interests with 
both breadth and depth. It provides a basis for informed participation in community 
organizations, electoral politics, national and world affairs, and public policy. Students 
receive a solid foundation for graduate study, including law, as well as for a wide 
variety of careers in both the public and private sector. Students often explore these 
possibilities through internships with government agencies, parties and groups, law 
firms, and selected businesses and non-profits. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Political Science must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Re- 
quirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements 
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Political Science must maintain a 2.0 grade point 
average in the course requirements of the major and receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in 
all Political Science courses. 

Required Courses in Political Science Major (60 credits): 

Political Science Core Requirements (30 credits) 



Department of History and Political Science 229 



PS 141 American Government: Foundations/Institutions 

PS 142 American Government: Process and Policy 

PS 1 5 1 Public Administration OR PS242 State/Local Government 

PS260 Comparative Politics 

PS262 Scope and Methods of Political Science 

PS 302 International Relations 

PS368 Ancient Political Thought or PS369 Modem Political Thought 

PS450 Senior Seminar 



Two of the following: 



H219 Western Civilization I 

H220 Western Civilization II 

H22 1 History of American Civilization I 

H222 History of American Civilization II 



Political Science Electives (27 credits) 

Nine of the following courses {seven must be at 300 level or above): 

PS151 Public Administration 

PS210 Introduction to Law 

PS242 State/Local Government 

PS243 Govt/Politics of Africa 

PS244 Govt/Politics of East Asia 

PS245 Govt/Politics of Latin America 

PS246 Govt/Politics of Mid East 

PS247 Govt/Politics of Russia 

PS250 Govt/Politics of South Asia 

PS303 American Foreign Policy 

PS305 Parties, Campaigns and Elections 

PS306 Introduction to International Organizations 

PS307 International Law 

PS308 International Political Economy 

PS310 Decision Making 

PS3 1 2 Politics of Public Policy 

PS352 Introduction to Public Finance 

PS36I American Political Thought 

PS362 The Congress 

PS363 The Presidency 

PS368 Ancient Political Thought 

PS369 Modem Political Thought 

PS371 American Constitutional Thought: Political Institutions 

PS372 American Constitutional Thought: Civil Lib/Rights 

PS406 International Peace and Security 

PS47 1 -480 Selected Topics 



230 Programs of Study 



PS490 Internship 
PS498/499 Independent Study 

Support Courses (3 credits) 

One of the following: 

ECO200 Principles of Economics - Macro 
G243 Introduction to Geography 
G331 Urban Geography 
G332 Economic Geography 
G361 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

Political Science (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

American Government (PS 141 and PS 142) 6 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Western Civ. OR American Civ. (Area IV) 3 

32 

Sophomore Year , Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 2 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 

Western Civ. OR American Civ. (Area IV) 3 

Public Administration OR State/Local Government 3 

Comparative Politics 3 

Scope and Methods of Political Science 3 

Political Science Support Course 3 

32-34 

Junior Year Credits 

International Relations 3 

Ancient or Modern Political Thought 3 

Political Science Courses 12 

Elective Courses 12 

30 



Department of History and Political Science 231 



Senior Year Credits 

Senior Seminar in Political Science 3 

Political Science Electives 15 

Elective Courses 12 

30 

Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education-Social Studies, with a double 
major in History 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-Social Stud- 
ies must complete a minimum of 134 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 3.0 or higher, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the 
General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete the Gen- 
eral Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Social Studies Education must earn a 3.0 or 
higher in the following four Common Core courses — two English courses, the Human 
Communications course, and one math course. They must also take a second elected 
mathematics course to be determined by the student and the advisor. 

Secondary Education-Social Studies is a dual major offered in conjunction with 
the Department of Education. Students who complete the Social Studies major also 
fulfill the requirements for the History major. 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-Social Studies: 

Discipline Certification Requirements- 

ECO200 Principles of Economics-Macro' OR 

ECO201 Principles of Economics-Micro' 

G243 Introduction to Geography' 

G341 Geography of North America or G350 Survey of Canada' 

H219 History of Western Civilization I' 

H220 History of Western Civilization IP 

H221 History of American Civilization I' 

H222 History of American Civilization IP 

PS 141 American Government: Institutions' OR 

PS 142 American Government: Process' 

PS242 State and Local Government' 

SOC220 American Social Problems' 

ANT2 10 Introduction to Physical Anthropology OR 

ANT220 Cultural Anthropology' 

H240 Methods/Theory History 

H440 Sr. Seminar in History 

1 8 additional credits in History, H223 or higher 



232 Programs of Study 



Pre-Professional Educator Status (PPES)'' 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED221 Introduction to American Education 

Math (see advisor) 

PS Y 100 General Psychology 

ED37 1 Psyc of Teaching/Learning Secondary 

SOC 1 00 Introduction to Sociology 

Professional Preparation Courses 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education"^ 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE35 1 Teaching Strategies 

SE352 Teaching Citizenship in Secondary Education 

SE360 ReadingAVriting Across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester--^ 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 
SE405 Focused Studies^ 
OR 

Professional Semester^ 
Alternative Program 

SE416 Directed Professional Educational Experience 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

'Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

-'Advancement to PPES requires successful completion of WRT102, WRT202, CM104, MAT! 11 , 2nd math 

course. ED221 with a minimum grade of 3.0 in each course. 

■*SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

^Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

""Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

'Students electing Alternative Program will select SE416 and other appropriate coursework. Must have prior 

approval from advisor and department chair. 

Secondary Education-Social Studies (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

History of Western Civilization I and II 6 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

General Psychology 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 2 

Introduction to American Education _3 

31 



Department of History and Political Science 233 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Math 3 

Human Communication 3 

Instructional Technology 3 

Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

American Civilization I and II 6 

American Government 3 

Methods/Theory of History _3 

36 

Junior Year Credits 

State and Local Government 3 

Introduction to Geography 3 

Geography of North America OR Survey of Canada 3 

Cultural or Physical Anthropology 3 

American Social Problems 3 

History Electives 12 

Secondary School Experience 3 

Teaching Strategies 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement _3_ 

36 

Senior Year Credits 

Teaching Reading/Writing Across the Curriculum 1 

Macro or Micro Economics 3 

History Elective 6 

History Seminar 3 

Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Education 3 

Community and Legal Issues in Education 3 

Student Teaching Semester {A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 12 
Student Teaching ED404 OR 
Focused Studies ED405 OR 
Alternative Program 
Practicum in Student Teaching SE412 

Selected Topics SE4 13 ", - , ■;. i . 



29 



DEPARTMENTAL MINORS 

African and African-American Studies (18 credits) 

At least six credits from these courses: 



234 Programs of Study 



INT 143 

PS243 

H303 

H305 

LIT386 



Introduction to Africa 
Government and Politics of Africa 
History of Africa I 
History of Africa II 
African Literature 



At least six credits from these courses: 

H306 Race and Racism 

H354 Coming of the Civil War OR 

H355 Civil War and Reconstruction 

H470 The Civil Rights Movement 

SOC315 Ethnic and Minority Relations 

LIT203 African- American Literature 

Two additional courses from the above categories. 



American History (18 credits) 

H22 1 -222 American Civilization I & II 



Four courses from 
H245 
H306 
H342 
H351 
H352 
H353 
H354 
H355 
H356 
H357 
H358 
H370 
H429 
H441 
H450 
H470-479 
H484 



the following: 

American Military Experience 

Race and Racism 

Women in the United States 

American Colonial History 

New American Nation 

The Jacksonian Era 

Coming of the Civil War 

Civil War and Reconstruction 

Emergence of Modern America 

Twentieth-Century America 

Recent America 

American Constitutional Thought 

War & Peace 

American Economic History 

American Social and Cultural History 

Special Topics 

Baseball History 



Geography (18 credits) 

G243 Introduction to Geography 
G361 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 
ESS 152 Earth/Space Science 

One course selected from the following: 

G34 1 Geography of North America 
G350 Survey of Canada 



Department of History and Political Science 235 



G348 Cultural and Environmental Field Studies 

Two courses selected from the following: 

G260 Introduction to Cartography 

G33 1 Urban Geography 

G332 Economic Geography 

G336 Historical Geography 

G470-479 Special Topics 

Legal Studies (18 credits) 

PS210 Introduction to Law 

Five courses from the following: [No more than three elective courses may be taken 
from any single discipline, for example Political Science (PS) or Criminal Justice 
(CJA).] 

PS307 International Law 

PS371/H371 American Constitutional Thought: Political Institutions 

PS372/H372 American Constitutional Thought: Civil Liberties 

CJA302 Criminal Law (pre-requisite CJA 101) 

CJA304 Legal Standards of Security (pre-requisite CJAlOl) 

CJA336 Judicial Process (pre-requisite CJA 101) 

CJA341 Criminal Procedure (pre-requisite CJA 101) 

BUS345 Business Law I 

BUS346 Business Law II (pre-requisite BUS345 with 2.0 or better) 

PHL347 Philosophy of Law 

Political Science (18 credits) 

PS 141 American Government: Foundations and Institutions 
PS 142 American Government: Process and Policy 

Three Political Science courses at the 300 level or above and one additional 
Political Science course. 

International Studies (18 credits) 

G243 Introduction to Geography 

PS260 Comparative Politics 

PS302 International Relations 

PS307 International Law 

One course selected from the following: 

IBS200 Principles of International Business 

PS243 Government and Politics of Africa 

PS244 Government and Politics of East Asia 

PS245 Government and Politics of Latin America 

PS246 Government and Politics of the Middle East 

PS247 Government and Politics of Russia 



236 Programs of Study 



PS250 Government and Politics of South Asia 

One course selected from the following: 

ECO400 International Economics 
G332 Economic Geography 
PS306 International Organizations 

Public Administration (18 credits) 

PS 141 American Government: Foundations and Institutions 
PS 1 5 1 Introduction to Public Administration 
PS242 State and Local Government 

One course selected from the following: 

PS310 Decision Making in the Public Sector 
PS312 Politics of Public Policy 
PS352 Introduction to Public Finance 

One course selected from the following: 

G331 Urban Geography 

G361 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

World History (18 credits) 

H2 19-220 Western Civilization I & II 

Four courses selected from the following: 

H227-228 History of Latin America I & II 

H303-305 History of Africa I & II 

H3 1 6 Ancient History 

H317 Medieval History 

H3 1 8 Renaissance and Reformation 

H330 History of 20th-century Russia 

H333-334 History of England 

H335 Modern Germany 

H340 Women and War 

H420 Nazi Germany 

H427-428 Modern Europe I & II 



^ DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC, ART, 
AND COMMUNICATION 



usic. Art. and Communication is rooted in the liberal arts tradition that teaches 
ai .5- -and communicates the human experience through sounds, images, and words. 
The faculty members of the Department are supportive and demanding mentors whose 
first priority is to help students discover their intellectual and creative potential. The 
Department promotes both a creative and cultural awareness within the College and an 
interactive educational and cultural link between the College and the community. 

Students pursuing any of the Department's academic programs are encouraged 
to take advantage of the interdisciplinary opportunities the Department offers to com- 
plement a major. Courses in the visual arts are of benefit to those studying art, mass 
communication, and public relations. Courses in audio and video production are of 
interest to those in art, music, and public relations. Musical ensembles and performing 
groups are available on a credit or voluntary basis to all students in the Department 
who wish to avail themselves of this creative outlet. 

The Department administers one of the most active internship programs on the 
campus. Students are encouraged to investigate the internship option as a means of 
exploring career choices and acquiring career experience before leaving college. 

ART 

The Music, Art. and Communication Department offers two baccalaureate programs 
in Art, one in Fine Art. and one in Graphic Design. These majors prepare the stu- 
dent to enter a variety of professional careers in the visual arts or graduate study. An 
associate degree in Fine Art is also offered, and academic minors are available in Art 
History. Fine Art, Visual Communication, and Photography. A course in Art Educa- 
tion is offered to students completing the bachelor of science degree in Elementary 
Education. 

PORTFOLIO SUBMISSION 

Portfolio Submission Requirements 

In addition to fulfilling all of York College's admissions requirements, a student seeking 
admittance into either the Fine Art or Graphic Design program is required to submit a 
portfolio of 10 to 20 examples of artwork. The portfolio should contain the student's 
best work to date, reflect a range of abilities, interests and concepts, and demonstrate 
experience in a variety of media. In addition, an introductory artist's statement must be 
included, which should be a brief synopsis of the applicant's experience, who or what 
has been an influence and how. and what aspirations are for the future. 

The portfolio is to be submitted via York College's online submission system located 
at www.ycp.edu/artportfolio. York College no longer accepts portfolio submissions via 
mail in slide form or CDs. The payment of a $10 portfolio submission fee, paid with a 
credit card online, is the final step in the submission process. The applicant will then 
receive confirmation of receipt by email with a confirmation number and approximate 
decision date. A portfolio will only be reviewed after the applicant has been accepted 
to York College. Acceptance to York College does not guarantee acceptance into art 
programs. 

237 



238 Programs of Study 



Portfolio Evaluation Criteria 

The Portfolio Review Committee wants to get a sense of who the apphcant is as an 
artist, through reading the artist's statement and viewing his or her best work to date. 
Experience in a variety of media, interesting perspectives and subject matter indicate 
to the committee that the applicant has potential for success in a college-level art 
program and beyond. A numerical score is given to the applicant in areas listed below. 
These numbers are then averaged for a final rating. 

The committee asks these questions during the evahiation of a portfolio: 

Are the images of good quality in terms of focus and lighting? j 

Is the artist's statement clear and substantive? ■ 

Is there a good sampling of several of the following media: ink, pencil, pastel, " 

oil, acrylic, collage, digital, photography, sculpture, fabric, jewelry, ceramics, 

printmaking, video, or web? | 

Is there drawing from both real and still life? 

Has there been experimentation with both realistic and expressive drawing and 

composition? 

Are there varied subjects and concepts in the portfolio? 

Is the subject matter a reflection of the applicant's interests? 

Portfolio Submission Dates 

The portfolio submission deadlines are November 1 (for entry in the spring semester) 
and January 31 and March 15 (for entry in the fall semester). The student will be 
notified by letter of the review committee's decision approximately two weeks after 
portfolios are reviewed. Portfolios will be reviewed on an as-received basis and 
accepted as space permits after the deadlines. 

Information for Transfer Students * 

The portfolio should contain a minimum of two examples of work from each art course 
the student wishes to transfer to York College. Transfer credit in Graphic Design is 
given only for foundation courses (with the exception of Computer Graphics I), art 
history courses, and art electives. Transfer credit in Fine Art is given for foundation 
courses, art history courses, art electives, and any additional nine credits in art. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS j 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fine Art I 

The bachelor of arts in Fine Art is designed to prepare the student for entry into 
professional positions such as illustrator, teacher, art director, art critic , studio/commercial 
photographer, or independent artist, and stresses lifelong growth as an artist. The program 
emphasizes mastering technical processes, understanding the role of cultural history 
as an influence upon artistic expression, developing verbal and visual communication 
skills, and the importance of creative and original thinking. Students expand their studio 
and academic experiences through exhibitions, internships in professional settings such 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 239 



as the College art gallery, completion of the Professional Development Seminar, and 
participation in activities such as artist's lectures and museum excursions. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Fine Art must complete a minimum 
of 126 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Fine Art are required to complete a series of 
foundation courses, which offer a common studio experience to all art majors. Foundation 
courses must be successfully completed by the end of the first semester of sophomore 
year. Foundation courses teach basic skills, provide a technical foundation on which 
to build, develop creative and problem-solving skills, and help identify professional 
and studio interests. The student is also required to participate in the Sophomore 
Portfolio Review and Senior Portfolio Review and Exhibition, both of which provide an 
opportunity for self-evaluation and professional evaluation. During the junior year the 
student participates in the Professional Development Seminar, and in the senior year the 
student enrolls in Fine Art Seminar and the Senior Art Major's Exhibition. The student 
is required to earn a grade of 2.0 or higher in all major courses. 

Required courses for the BA in Fine Art: 

Foundation Courses 



ART206 


Computer Graphics I 


ART210 


Design I 


ART211 


Design II 


ART215 


Drawing I 


ART220 


Painting I 


ART265 


Drawing II 


ART230 


Sculpture I 



Art History Courses 

ART204 Survey ofWestern Art I 

ART205 Survey of Western Art II 
Two Art History Electives (ART388, ART389, ART390, ART391 , ART392, ART393, 
ART394,ART395) 

Major Required Courses 

ART298 Sophomore Portfolio Review 

ART435 Professional Development Seminar 

ART440 Senior Portfolio Review and Exhibition 

ART437 Fine Art Seminar 

ART450 Art Internship OR ART498 Independent Study 



240 Programs of Study 



Primary Emphasis 

Drawing (ART216, 315, 365) 
Figure Drawing (ART216, 266, 316, 366) 
Illustration (ART223, 273, 323, 373) 
Painting (ART270, 320, 370) 
Photography (ART245, 295, 345, 385) 
Sculpture (ART280, 330, 380) 

Secondary Emphasis 

Ceramics (ART225, 275) 
Digital Art (ART290, 339) 
Drawing (ART265, 316) 
Figure Drawing (ART266, 316) 
Illustration (ART223, 273) 
Jewelry (ART284, 294) 
Painting (ART270, 320) 
Photography (ART245, 295) 
Printmaking (ART287, 291) 
Sculpture (ART280, 330) 

Fine Art (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Fall 

Computer Graphics I 3 

Design I 3 

Drawing I 3 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving 3 

15 
Spring 

Design II 3 

Drawing II 3 

Survey Western Art I 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy _2 

17 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Fall 

Sculpture I 3 

Painting I 3 

Survey of Western Art II 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 241 



Physical Education _A. 

16 

Spring 

Primary Emphasis 3 

Secondary Emphasis 3 

Sophomore Portfoho Review 1 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Elective ^ 

16 

Junior Year Credits 
Fall 

Primary Emphasis 3 

Secondary Emphasis 3 

Art History Elective 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

15 

Spring 

Primary Emphasis 3 

Art History Elective 3 

Professional Development Seminar 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1 

Free Elective _3 

16 

Senior Year Credits 

Fall 

Primary Emphasis 3 

Fine Art Seminar 3 

Art Internship OR Independent Study 3 

Free Electives _§. 

15 
Spring 

Senior Portfolio Review/Exhibition 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement ' 3 

Free Electives _6 

15 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Graphic Design 

This professional program, combined with a strong academic curriculum, provides 
graduates with the skills and knowledge they will need to enter diverse areas of visual 
communication such as publication design, advertising design, packaging, corporate 
identity design, and multimedia production, or to pursue graduate study. The program 



242 Programs of Study 



contains components of studio work, design theory, criticism, and history. Student de- 
signers learn not only about the tools and techniques, both traditional and digital, nec- 
essary to make their ideas come to life, but also the ways in which their work relates 
to their culture and society. The program's emphasis on the history of graphic design 
gives students a valuable perspective on where their chosen discipline has been, where 
it is going, and how technology affects the way we communicate. Through professional 
memberships, internships, field trips, and exposure to visiting artists, students gain 
valuable perspective on personal areas of interest in the vast and changing field of 
design. 

Requirements for Graduation: J 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Graphic Design must complete a 
minimum of 129 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Re- 
quirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements 
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Graphic Design are required to complete a series of 
foundation courses , which offer a common studio experience for all art majors . Foundation 
courses must be successfully completed by the end of the first semester of sophomore 
year. Foundation courses teach basic skills, provide a technical foundation on which to 
build, develop creative and problem-solving skills, and help identify professional and 
studio interests. The student is also required to participate in the Sophomore Portfolio 
Review and Senior Portfolio Review and Exhibition, which provide an opportunity for 
self-evaluation and professional evaluation. During senior year the student participates 
in the Professional Development Seminar and the Senior Art Major's Exhibition. The 
student is required to earn a 2.0 or higher in all major courses. 

Required courses for the BA in Graphic Design: 

ART200 Introduction to Graphic Design 

ART206 Computer Graphics I 

ART215 Drawing I 

ART265 Drawing II 

ART218 Typography I 

ART220 Painting I 

ART287 Printmaking I 

Art History Courses 

ART204 Survey of Western Art I 

ART205 Survey of Western Art II 

ART389 History of Graphic Design 

Art History Elective (ART388, ART390, ART391, ART392, ART393, 

ART394,ART395) 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 243 

Major Required Courses 



ART299 


Sophomore Portfolio Review 


ART219 


Typography II 


ART246 


Digital Photography 


ART290 


Computer Graphics II 


ART340 


Computer Graphics III 


ART296 


Publication Design 


ART339 


Motion Graphics 


ART398 


Junior Design Studio 


ART432 


Senior Design Studio 


ART436 


Professional Development Seminar 


ART441 


Senior Exhibition 


ART450 


Art Internship OR ART498 Independent Study 


Electives 





Two classes from the following: 

Illustration (ART223, 273, 323, 373) 

Photography (ART245, 295, 345, 385) 

Printmaking II (ART291) 

Digital Art { ART244) 

Sculpture (ART230. 280, 284, 294. 330, 380) 

Painting (ART270, 320, 370) 

Figure Drawing (ART216, 266, 316, 366) 

Art History (ART394. 395) 

Graphic Design (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Fall 

Intro to Graphic Design 3 

Computer Graphics I 3 

Drawing I 3 

Analytical ReadingAVriting 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving 3 

15 
Spring 

Survey Western Art I 3 

Typography I 3 

Drawing II 3 

Academic Writing :;, . 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy _2 

17 



244 Programs of Study 



Sophomore Year Credits 
Fall 

Survey of Western Art II 3 

Painting I 3 

Digital Photography 3 

Computer Graphics II 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education j 

16 

Spring 

Typography II 3 

Printmaking I 3 

Sophomore Portfolio Review \ 

History of Graphic Design 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

16 

Junior Year Credits 

Fall 

Publication Design 3 

Computer Graphics III 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

15 

Spring 

Motion Graphics « 3 

Junior Design Studio 3 

Professional Development Seminar 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

Internship OR Independent Study 3 
(usually in Summer) 

19 

Senior Year Credits 

Fall 

Senior Design Studio 3 

Art Elective 3 

Art History Elective 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 245 



Spring 

Senior Portfolio Review/Exhibition 1 

Art Elective 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Electives 6 

l6 

COMMUNICATION 

Communication includes the study of the theories and skills of human communica- 
tion that comprise intrapersonal, inteipersonal. small group, public, and mass 
communication. 

Baccalaureate degree students may select from three majors within the Communi- 
cation degree program. Students choosing the Speech Communication Major are 
preparing for careers in education, sales, advertising, and business. They also work 
within health, social, and government organizations. The Mass Communication Major 
prepares students for careers in commercial broadcasting or corporate applications of 
audio and video. Students selecting the Public Relations Major are preparing specifi- 
cally for careers in corporations, not-for-profit organizations, and public relation firms. 
Public Relations combines the application of communication skills with strategic 
planning abilities. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Speech Communication 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Speech Communication must com- 
plete a minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or 
higher, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and satisfactorily complete the 
General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General 
Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Speech Communication must earn a grade of 2.0 
or higher in all courses taken in the major. 

The required courses for the Speech Communication Major are: 

Communication Theory (CM206) 
Rhetoric and Public Address (CM207) 
Persuasion (CM327) 
Interpersonal Communication (CM329) 
Communication Seminar (CM402) 

In addition, students are required to select six competency courses from the following 
offerings: 

Public Speaking Practicum (CMlOO-103-three one-credit courses) 
Public Speaking (CM212) 



246 Programs of Study 



Nonverbal Communication (CM222) 

Group Discussion (CM304) 

Argumentation and Debate (CMS 10) 

Organizational Communication (CM328) 

Special Topics in Communication (CM444) 

Communication Internship (CM450, CM451-may apply only three credits) 

Any existing writing course in Communication or English 

Area Electives 

Students must also complete an area elective requirement by selecting any two 
Communication courses offered within the three majors. 

Humanities/Social Science Electives 

Students are required to complete four courses in the humanities or social and 
behavioral sciences at the 200 level or above. One of these courses must be a 
literature course. 

Free Electives 25-27 credits 



Speech Communication (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 

Human Communication or Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Public Speaking Practicum 2 

Physical Education 1 

29-31 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

Area Elective 3 

Elective or Human Communication 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Communication Theory 3 

Rhetoric and Public Address 3 

Competency Elective 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Public Speaking Practicum 1 

Physical Education _1 

32 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 247 



Junior Year 


Credits 


Area I Distribution Requirement 


3 


Humanities. Social or Behavioral Science Electives 


6 


Competency Courses 


9 


Persuasion 


3 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


Area Elective 


3 


Free Electives 


6 




33 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Humanities. Social or Behavioral Science Electives 


6 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 


Free Electives 


6 


Communication Seminar 


3 


Competency Elective 


3 


Free Electives 


9 




30 



Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mass Communication 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Mass Communication must com- 
plete a minimum of 126 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or 
higher, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General Edu- 
cation Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Re- 
quirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Mass Communication must earn a grade of 2.0 
or higher in all courses taken in the major. 

Ttie required courses for the Mass Communication Major are: 

Performance I (CM 120) 

RadioPracticumI(CM132) .-. 

Communication Theory (CM206) 

Mass Communication (CM211) 

Audio Production (CM226) 

Video Production I (CM242) 

Media Writing (CM332) 

News Writing and Production (CM340) 

Video Production II (CM341) 

Media Management (CM410) 

Media Laws and Ethics (CM434) 



248 Programs of Study 



Support Courses 

Section I (choose 2): 
Performance II (CM320) 
Non-Linear Editing (CM330) 
Broadcast Portfolio I (CM333) 
Electronic News Reporting (CM355) 
Advanced Production (CM431) 

Section II (choose 1): 

Broadcast Portfolio II (CM433) 

Special Topics (CM444) 

Internship (3 credits only) (CM450-45 1 ) 

Independent Study 

Area Electives 

Students must also complete an area elective requirement by selecting any two 
Communication courses offered within the three majors. 

Required Visual Communication Courses 
Choose 18 credits from the following: 

Intro to Art Appreciation (ARTlOl) 

Concepts of Design (ART 110) 

Concepts of Computer Graphics (ART 134) 

Survey of Western Art I or II (ART204 or 205) 

Drawing I (ART2 15) 

Photography I (ART245) 

Digital Photography (ART246) 

Drawing II (ART265) 

Free Electives 20 credits 

Mass Communication (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 

Human Communication or Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Radio Practicum 1 

Physical Education 1 

Performance I 3 

Visual Communication Course 3 

31 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 249 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

Area Elective 3 

Elective or Human Communication 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Communication Theory 3 

Mass Communication 3 

Audio Production 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Physical Education 1 

Visual Communication Course _3 

34 

Junior Year Credits 

Support Courses in Major 9 

Video Production I 4 

Area Elective 3 

Free Electives 8 

Broadcast Media Writing 3 

News Writing/Production 3 

Video Production II _4 

34 

Senior Year Credits 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Media Management 3 

Media Laws and Ethics 3 

Free Electives 6 

Visual Communication Courses 12 

27 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Public Relations 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Public Relations must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher, 
satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Re- 
quirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements 
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis, and credits earned in WRTIOO may not be ap- 
plied to degree requirements. 

In addition, students majoring in Public Relations must earn a grade of 2.0 or 
higher in all courses taken in the major. 



250 Programs of Study 



The required courses for the Public Relations Major are: 

Communication Theory (CM206) 
Introduction to Public Relations (CM221) 
Print Media Writing (CM271) 
Writing for Public Relations (CM321) 
Persuasion (CM327) 
Public Relations Planning (CM415) 
Public Relations Campaigns (CM421) 
Media Law and Ethics (CM434) 

Support Courses 

In addition, students are required to select five support courses from the 
following offerings: 

Mass Communication (CM211) 

Public Speaking (CM2 12) 

Group Discussion (CM304) 

Media Relations (CM322) 

Publications Editing and Design (CM323) 

Public Relations Events and Promotions (CM324) 

Organizational Communication (CM328) 

Interpersonal Communication (CM329) 

Communication Seminar (CM402) 

Crisis Communications Management (CM423) 

Communication Internship (CM450 , 45 1 ) 

Principles of Marketing (MKTIOO) 

Area Elective 

Students must also complete an area elective requirement by selecting one 
Communication course offered within the three majors. 

Humanities/Social Science Electives 

Students must complete four courses in the humanities or social and behavioral 
sciences at the 200 level or above. One of these courses must be a literature 
course. 

Free Electives 22-24 credits 

Public Relations (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirements 6-8 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 251 



Human Communication or Elective 




3 


Free Electives 




6 


Physical Education 




1 

30-32 


Sophomore Year 




Credits 


Academic Writing 




3 


Area Elective 




3 


Print Media Writing 




3 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 




3 


Area II Distribution Requirement 
Communication Theory 
Introduction to Public Relations 




3 
3 
3 


Area V Distribution Requirements 
Physical Education 
Free Elective 




6 

1 

3 

31 


Junior Year 




Credits 


Area I Distribution Requirement 

Humanities, Social or Behavioral Science Electives 


3 
6 


Support Courses 
Persuasion 




9 

3 


Writing for Public Relations 




3 


Area Elective 




3 


Free Electives 




6 

33 


Senior Year 




Credits 


Humanities, Social or Behavioral Science 


Electives 


6 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 

Support Course 

Public Relations Planning 




3 
3 
3 


Public Relations Campaigns • 
Media Laws and Ethics 




3 
3 


Free Electives • 




9 
30 



MUSIC 

The Division of Music provides students with the opportunity to study music within 
the context of a liberal arts education. The Division offers three baccalaureate degree 
programs: 

The bachelor of science degree in General Music Education (BSGME) is 
a professional degree, stressing competence in teaching the full range of vocal. 



252 Programs of Study 



instrumental, and general music from kindergarten through high school. Students 
acquire a common body of knowledge and skills that constitute a basic foundation 
for work and continuing growth as a professional musician. Studies are intended to 
develop knowledge and competencies in performance, aural and analytical skills, 
composition and improvisation, history and repertoire, and music technology. Students 
pursuing this degree learn to synthesize their knowledge about music and pedagogy, 
developing the ability to work independently, form and defend value judgments, work 
with a comprehensive repertoire from various historical periods and cultures, and 
understand the basic interrelationships and interdependencies among various music 
professions. This degree prepares students for professional teacher certification (K-12) 
in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

The bachelor of science degree in Music with studies in music industry and 
recording technology (BSM/MIRT) is designed to give students a broad understanding 
of the activities and responsibilities of the music producer, stressing studies in music, 
music industry, business, and recording technology. 

The bachelor of arts degree in Music (BAM) allows students to acquire a broad 
knowledge of music, stressing the development of musicianship, the ability to perform 
and an intellectual grasp of the art. Students pursuing this degree are encouraged to 
achieve the highest possible level of musical discrimination, creativity, and skill in 
performance. 

In addition, students may pursue a two-year associate of arts degree with an 
emphasis in Music, a minor in Music, or a minor in Music Industry. 

Music Auditions and Admission to Music Majors 

Official admission to any of the three baccalaureate degrees listed above is by audition 
only. Auditions may be scheduled on certain designated days during the academic year 
or by appointment during the summer months. In special circumstances, applicants 
may request admission into a major after the successful completion of their jury 
examination at the end of their first semester of study. 

The audition must demonstrate musicianship, musical sensitivity, and 
performance skill on the student's primary instrument. Three contrasting compositions 
of the student's choice must be presented. In addition, the student may be asked to 
demonstrate basic music reading skills to, show satisfactory proficiency in executing 
major and minor scales and technical studies, and to answer questions concerning their 
musical experience and training. Audition candidates should dress appropriately for 
their audition, and present themselves in a dignified and professional manner. 

Performance Attendance 

All music majors are required to attend a wide variety of performances, concerts, 
and recitals throughout the school year. Students are responsible for verifying their 
attendance record. Failure to attend the required number of programs may result in 
the lowering of a student's applied music grade, and may affect the student's ability to 
advance within their respective curriculum, and may cause their financial aid and/or 
music scholarship to be reduced or revoked. 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 253 



Performance Requirements 

All BSGME and BAM students in consultation with their applied music instructor 
are required to perform in a student recital at least once each semester. BSM/MIRT 
students are not required to perform, but are encouraged to perform at the discretion of 
their applied music instructor. 

All BSGME and BAM students are required to perform a solo recital during their 
senior year. Six credits with a grade of 2.0 or higher in the primary instrument must 
be completed before presenting the senior recital. The senior recital will be graded 
by the music faculty and the result reported in the student's permanent file. Before 
performing the senior recital, the student must successfully complete a recital hearing 
at least two weeks prior to the recital date. The recital program and all program notes 
must be presented at the recital hearing for approval by the Music faculty. Should the 
student fail the recital hearing, a second hearing may be required and the recital date 
may be delayed. 

At the discretion of the applied music instructor, any Music major may request 
permission from the Music faculty to present a junior recital. This recital is often 
shared with another junior Music major, and is subject to the same rules and standards 
as a senior recital. 

Piano Proficiency Requirements 

All Music majors are required to meet basic piano requirements before graduation. 
Students majoring in Music (BAM) or General Music Education (BSGME) must 
pass a piano proficiency examination, which is normally taken after four semesters 
of lessons. The examination includes scales, chords, repertoire, sight reading, 
harmonization, transposition, and accompaniment. A student must continue to enroll 
in applied piano until he or she passes all areas of the exam, regardless of how many 
credits in piano are accumulated. If the student passes the exam completely before 
the end of the sophomore year, he or she may study voice or another instrument to 
satisfy the requirement in secondary instrument. Music industry majors (BSM/MIRT) 
are not required to pass the piano proficiency exam. However, they must meet the 
proficiency requirements of their individual piano instructors. More detailed piano 
proficiency instructions and requirements may be obtained from the student's advisor 
or the Coordinator of Keyboard Studies. 

Applied Music 

Applied music study is an important part of a music student's experience at York 
College. Whether the student is taking private lessons as a requirement or as an 
extracurricular activity, it is in the private studio that the student learns to apply 
musicianship and to develop skill in performance. 

Applied music lessons should be scheduled with the applied music instructor or 
the Director of the Division of Music during the first full week of classes. Once the 
drop/add period is over, and the student has scheduled a lesson time, the applied music 
fee will not be refunded for any reason (see catalog under Special Fees). 

The applied music student is expected to practice a minimum of 30 minutes per 



254 Programs of Study 



day per half credit of applied music instruction. However, the student should always 
consult with their instructor for specific practice requirements, as some instructors 
may require more than the minimum. 

Depending on the number of credits enrolled, the student will receive 12 half-hour 
lessons or 12 50-minute lessons during a semester. Excused absences due to student 
illness or other personal problems will be rescheduled at the instructor's discretion. 
Lessons missed by the instructor will normally be rescheduled. 

All students pursuing the bachelor of science degree in General Music Education are 
required to participate in chamber music ensembles (small ensembles) every semester. 
These groups will be supervised and coached by the appropriate applied music faculty 
member in the student's primary area of study. Students will study repertoire that 
features one performer on a part, which may include duets, trios, quartets, and/or other 
chamber music configurations. The Music faculty considers this requirement to be 
critical in assisting the General Music Education student in achieving the essential 
competency and experience for the effective teaching of chamber music activities. 

Jury Examinations 

All students majoring in one of the three degrees in music (BSGME, BSM/MIRT, and 
BAM) are required to take a jury examination at the end of each semester of study. The 
examination will be administered by a committee of Music faculty members , who will 
present the student with written comments regarding their progress and a grade for the 
examination. This grade will constitute 25% of the student's final semester grade in 
applied music. 

Satisfactory progress must be demonstrated with each additional semester of 
study. Should the student fail to do so, the examining committee may recommend 
that the student be placed on music probation. If the probationary status is not 
removed after one additional semester of study, the student may be dropped from their 
respective major and may be in danger of losing any financial aid awarded through the 
Music Division. A student may be removed from music probation by demonstrating 
satisfactory progress in the primary applied music area during the jury examination 
following the semester of music probation. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in General Music Education 

The bachelor of science degree in General Music Education (K-12 Certification) 
is a professional program stressing competence in teaching the full range of vocal, 
instrumental, and general music from kindergarten through high school. 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in General Music Education must 
complete a minimum of 134 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 
3.0 or above, satisfy the College's residency requirement and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. In addition, students majoring in 
General Music Education must earn a minimum grade of 2.0 in all required Music 
courses. 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 255 



Required Courses in General Music Education: 

In addition to the Common Core, Area Distribution Requirements, Professional 
Education Courses, and a supervised Student Teaching Semester, the following music 
courses are required (See Check Sheet for specific courses in these areas): 

Historical and Theoretical Courses 

MUS 1 8 1 Foundations of Music Theory ( may be exempt) 

MUS 1 82-283 Music Theory I-V 

MUS 1 84-285 Sight Singing/Ear Training I-V 

MUS290 Introduction to Music Literature 

MUS380 Ethnomusicology 

MUS390-391 Music History I-II 

MUS385 Form and Analysis 

MUS486 Orchestration and Arranging 

MUS490 Choral Conducting 

MUS491 Instrumental Conducting 

Music Education Courses 

MUS 146 Vocal Methods (Instrumentalists only) 

MUS292 String Methods 

MUS293 Brass Methods 

MUS294 Woodwind Methods 

MUS295 Percussion Methods 

MUS298 Foreign Language Diction for Choirs (Vocalists and Pianists only) 

MUS392 Teaching Music in the Elementary Schools 

MUS393 Teaching Music in the Secondary Schools 

Performance Courses 

Primary Applied Music 7 credits 

Secondary Applied Music 2 credits 

Music Ensembles 7 credits 

Senior Recital credits 

Piano Proficiency credits 



General Music Education (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Area V Distribution Requirement 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 

Human Communication 

Information Literacy 

Introduction to American Education 

Foundations to Music Theory (may be exempt) 

Music Theory I 



Credits 
3 
3 
.3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 



256 Programs of Study 



Sight Singing and Ear Training I 1 

Introduction to Music Literature 3 

Foreign Language Diction OR Vocal Methods 1 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Secondary Applied Music 1 

Music Ensemble ^ 

36 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

General Psychology 3 

Math (see advisor) 3 

Physical Education 2 

Music Theory II, III 6 

Sight Singing and Ear Training 11, HI 2 

Music History I, II 6 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Secondary Applied Music 1 

Music Ensemble _2 

36 

Junior Year Credits 

Instructional Technology 3 

Music Theory IV 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training IV 1 

String Methods 1 

Brass Methods 1 

Woodwind Methods 1 

Percussion Methods 1 

Teaching Music in the Elementary School 3 

Teaching Music in the Secondary School 3 

Form and Analysis 3 

Orchestration and Arranging 3 

Ethnomusicology 3 

Choral Conducting 3 

Instrumental Conducting _^ 

36 

Senior Year Credits 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 257 



Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Reading across the Curriculum 1 

Psychology of Teaching 3 

Primary Applied Music 1 

Senior Recital 

Music Ensemble 1 
Student Teaching (K-12) OR 

Focused Studies 8 

Practicum in Student Teaching 1 

Selected Topics in Education 3 

30 



*Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Music Industry and Recording Technology 

The bachelor of science degree in Music (with studies in music industry and recording 
technology) is designed to give students a broad understanding of the activities and 
responsibilities of the music producer, stressing studies in music, music industry, 
business, and recording technology. 

To be eligible for graduation, students must complete a minimum of 124 credits, 
achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above, satisfy the College's 
residency requirement and complete all General Education Requirements of the 
College. In addition, students majoring in Music Industry and Recording Technology 
must earn a minimum grade of 2.0 in all required Music courses. 

Required Courses in Music Industry and Recording Technology: 

In addition to the Common Core and the Area Distribution Requirements, the following 
music, audio, music industry, and business courses are required (See Check Sheet for 
specific courses in these areas): 

Historical and Theoretical Courses 

MUS 1 8 1 Foundations of Music Theory (may be exempt) 

MUSI 8 1-1 83 Music Theory I-II 

MUS 1 84-1 85 Sight Singing/Ear Training I-II 

MUS246 Jazz and Popular Music Theory 

MUS247 Commercial Song Writing 

MUS290 Introduction to Music Literature 

Support Courses (choose four) 

MUS286 Jazz History 

MUS287 American Popular Music 

MUS288 History of Rock and Roll 

MUS380 Ethnomusicology 

MUS450/451 Music Industry Internship 

MUS498/499 Independent Study 



258 Programs of Study 



Business, Music Industry, and Recording Technology Courses 

MKT200 Principles of Marketing 

MGT250 Principles of Management 

BUS340 Small Business Ventures 

CM221 Introduction to Public Relations 

MUS297 Survey of Music Industry 

MUS397 Entertainment and Promotion 

MUS497 Copyright and Licensing 

CM231 Audio Production I 

MUS346 Music Production I 

MUS446 Music Production II 

Music Performance Courses 

Primary Applied Music 4 Credits 

Secondary Applied Music 2 Credits (2 credits must be in piano) 

Music Ensemble 4 Credits 

Music Industry and Recording Technology (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Critical Thinking 3 

Applied Piano 1 

Applied Music 2 

Music Ensemble 2 

Foundations of Music Theory (may be exempt) 3 

Introduction to Music Literature 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Music Theory I 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training I 1 

Music Support Course _6 

32 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Area II Distribution Requirement 6 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Human Communication 3 

Audio Production I 3 

Music Theory II 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training II 1 

Jazz and Popular Music Theory 3 

Survey of Music Industry 3 

Applied Piano 1 

Applied Music 2 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 259 



Music Ensemble 
Physical Education 
General Elective 



2 
2 

35 



Junior Year 

Area III Distribution Requirement 
Area IV Distribution Requirement 
Area V Distribution Requirement 
Music Production I 
Music Support Course 
Commercial Song Writing 
Entertainment and Promotion 
Principles of Marketing 
Introduction to Public Relations 
General Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_3 
33 



Senior Year 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 
Area V Distribution Requirement 
Music Production II 
Principles of Management 
Small Business Ventures 
Copyright and Licensing 
General Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
_6 
24 



Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music 

The bachelor of arts degree in Music (BAM) allows students to acquire a broad 
knowledge of music, stressing the development of musicianship, the ability to perform 
and an intellectual grasp of the art. 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Music must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above, 
satisfy the College's residency requirement, and complete the General Education 
Requirements of the College. In addition, students majoring in Music must earn a 
minimum grade of 2.0 in all required music courses. 

Required Courses in Music: 

In addition to the Common Core and Area Distribution Requirements, the following 
music courses are required (See Check Sheet for specific courses in these areas): 

Historical and Theoretical Courses 

MUS 1 8 1 Foundation of Music Theory (may be exempt) 
MUS 1 82-283 Music Theory I-IV 



260 Programs of Study 



MUS 1 84-285 Sight Singing/Ear Training I-IV 

MUS290 Introduction to Music Literature 

MUS390-391 Music History I-II 

MUS385 Form and Analysis 

MUS486 Orchestration and Arranging 

j MUS490 Choral Conducting 

MUS491 Instrumental Conducting 

Music Performance Courses 

Primary Applied Music 8 Credits 

Secondary Applied Music 2 Credits 

Music Ensembles 8 Credits 

Piano Proficiency Credits 

Senior Recital Credits 

Music Electives 6 Credits 



Music (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year 

Foundations of Music Theory (may be exempt) 

Music Theory I 

Sight Singing and Ear Training I 

Primary Applied Music 

Secondary Applied Music 

Music Ensemble 

Introduction to Music Literature 

Analytical Reading and Writing 

Academic Writing 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 

Information Literacy 

Physical Education 

General Electives 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
_6 
31 



Sophomore Year 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 

Area V Distribution Requirement 

Music Theory II, III 

Sight Singing and Ear Training II, III 

Music History I, II 

Primary Applied Music 

Secondary Applied Music 

Music Ensemble 

Human Communication 

General Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
2 
6 
2 
1 
2 
3 
_3 
31 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 261 



Junior Year Credits 

Area III Distribution Requirement 6 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Music Theory IV 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training IV 1 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Music Ensemble 2 

Form and Analysis 3 

Orchestration and Arranging 3 

Music Elective 3 

General Elective _7 

33 

Senior Year Credits 

Area II Distribution Requirement 6 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Choral Conducting 3 

Instrumental Conducting 3 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Music Ensemble 2 

Music Elective 3 

Senior Recital 

General Elective 7 

29 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Associate of Arts Degree in Fine Art 

The associate degree in Fine Art introduces the technical and conceptual skills to 
individuals preparing for a professional career in the visual arts. The program em- 
phasizes mastering technical processes, understanding the role of cultural history as an 
influence upon artistic expression, developing verbal and visual communication skills, 
and the importance of creative and original thinking. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

The student is required to complete a series of foundation courses, which are a com- 
mon studio experience for all art majors. Foundation courses must be successfully 
completed by the end of the first semester of sophomore year. Foundation courses 
teach basic skills, provide a technical foundation on which to build, develop creative 
and problem-solving skills, and help identify professional and studio interests. The 
student is also required to participate in the Sophomore Portfolio Review. 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Fine Art must complete a 
minimum of 68 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
college's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not 



262 Programs of Study 



be taken on a pass/fail basis. The student is required to earn a 2.0 or higher in all 
major courses. 

Required courses for the Associate Degree in Fine Art: } 

Foundation Courses • 



ART206 


Computer Graphics I 


ART210 


Design I 


ART211 


Design II 


ART215 


Drawing I 


ART220 


Painting I 


ART265 


Drawing II 


ART230 


Sculpture I 


ART298 


Sophomore Portfolio Review 



Art History Courses 

ART204 Survey of Western Art I 
ART205 Survey of Western Art II 
One Art Elective 

Primary Emphasis 

Digital Art (ART244, 339) 
Drawing (ART216,315) 
Figure Drawing (ART266, 316) 
Illustration (ART223, 273) 
Jewelry (ART284, 294) 
Painting (ART270, 320) 
Photography (ART245, 295) 
Printmaking (ART287, 291) 
Sculpture (ART280, 330) 

Fine Art (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Computer Graphics I 3 

Drawing I 3 

Drawing II 3 

Design I 3 

Design II 3 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education _\_ 

33 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 263 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Painting I 3 

Sculpture I 3 

Sophomore Portfolio Review 1 

Primary Emphasis 6 

Survey Western Art I 3 

Survey of Western Art II 3 

Art History Elective 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

35 



Associate of Arts Degree in Mass Communication 

An associate degree is available in Mass Communication. Associate degree students 
will receive instruction in theory and skill development necessary for successful 
application in related work environments. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Mass Communication must com- 
plete a minimum of 62 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, sat- 
isfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Re- 
quirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements 
may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 

Thie required courses for the Associate degree in 
IVIass Communication are: 

Mass Communication (CM2 11) • . s. 

\ Audio Production I (CM226) 

Video Production I (CM242) 

News Writing and Production (CM340) , , ,r 

Radio TV/Reporting (CM355) 
Media Writing (CM332) 
Radio Practicum (CM132-CM135; must take three 1 -credit courses) 

Mass Communication (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Radio Practicum 2 

Human Communication 3 



264 Programs of Study 



Information Literacy 2 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3-4 

Free Elective 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1_ 

32-33 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Academic Writing 3 

Radio Practicum 1 

Audio Production I 3 

Video Production I 4 

News Writing Production 3 

Radio/TV Reporting 3 

Media Writing 3 

Mass Communication 3 

Free Electives 6 

Physical Education _\_ 

30 

Associate of Arts Degree in IVIusic 

The associate of art degree with an emphasis in Music allows the student to integrate 
music studies into a five semester liberal arts program. 

To be eligible for graduation, students pursuing an associate of arts degree in 
Music must complete a minimum of 63 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General 
Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education 
Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. In addition, students majoring in 
Music must earn a minimum grade of 2.0 in all required Music courses. 

The required courses for the Associate Degree in IVIusic are: 

In addition to the Common Core and the Area Distribution Requirements, the following 
music courses are required (See Check Sheet for specific courses in these areas): 

Historical and Theoretical Courses 

MUS 1 8 1 Foundations of Music Theory (may be exempt) 

MUSI 8 1-283 Music Theory I-IV 

MUS 1 84-285 Sight Singing/Ear Training I-IV 

MUS290 Introduction to Music Literature 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 265 



Music Performance Courses 

Primary Applied Music 4 Credits 

Secondary Applied Music 2 Credits 
Music Ensemble 4 Credits 

Piano Proficiency Credits 

Music (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Physical Education 1 

Foundations of Music Theory (may be exempt) 3 

Music Theory I 3 

Sight Reading and Ear Training I ,1 

Introduction to Music Literature 3 

Primary Applied Music 2 

Secondary Applied Music . 1 

Music Ensemble _2 

30 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 1 

General Electives 6 

Music Theory IL III 6 

Sight Reading and Ear Training II. Ill 2 

Primary Applied Music ' ' 2 

Secondary Applied Music ■ ' 1 

Music Ensemble . , _2 

29 

Fifth Semester Credits 

Music Theory IV 3 

Sight Singing and Ear Training IV \ 

4 
DEPARTMENT MINORS 

Art History Minor (18 credits) 

The Art History Minor requires six courses selected from the following: 
ARTlOl Introduction to Art Appreciation* 



*Fine Art and Graphic Design majors may not apply this course to a minor in Art History. 



266 Programs of Study 



1 



ART204 


Survey of Western Art I 


ART205 


Survey of Western Art II 


ART388 


History of Photography 


ARTS 89 


History of Graphic Design 


ART390 


Art of the Classical World 


ART391 


Nineteenth-Century Art 


ART393 


American Art 


' ,,,»,,, ART394 


Twentieth-Century Art I 


ART395 


Twentieth-Century Art II 


ART498/ART499 


Independent Study 


Music Minor (18 Credits) 


MUS182-183 


Music Theory I-II 


MUSI 84- 185 


Sight Singing/Ear Training I-II 


MUS290 


Introduction to Music Literature 


Applied Music 


2 Credits 


Music Ensemble 


2 Credits 


Music Elective 


3 Credits 


Music Industry Minor (18 Credits) 


MUS181 


Foundation of Music Theory (may be exempt) 


MUS297 


Survey of Music Industry 


MUS397 


Entertainment and Promotion 


MUS497 


Copyright and Licensing 


Pick six additional credits from the following: 


MUS200 


Music Appreciation OR 


MUS291 


Introduction to Music Literature for Music majors 


MUS286 


Jazz History 


MUS287 


American Popular Music 


MUS288 


History of Rock and Roll 


Applied Music 


3 Credits 



Fine Art Minor (15 credits) 

The Fine Art Minor requires five courses: 

Introduction to Art Appreciation (ARTlOl) / or Survey of Western Art I (ART204), 

OR Survey of Western Art II (ART205) 

And any FOUR courses from the following: 

ART 1 1 Concepts of Design 

ART 1 1 2 Concepts of Figure Drawing 

ART 1 1 4 Concepts of Painting 

ART 1 1 6 Concepts of Sculpture 

ART215 Drawing I 



Department of Music, Art, and Communication 267 



ART225 Ceramics I 

ART245 Photography I 

ART275 Ceramics II 

ART396 Art Education for Elementary School Teachers 

ART397 Art in Recreation: Beyond Arts and Crafts 

Photography Minor (15 credits) 

The Photography Minor requires five courses: 

ARTl 10 Concepts of Design 

ART245 Photography I 

ART295 Photo II 

ART388 History of Photography 

And one of the following: 

ART246 Digital Photography 
ART345 Photography III 
ART385 Photography IV 

Public Relations Minor (18 credits) 

CM221 Introduction to Public Relations 

CM27 1 Print Media Writing 

CM32 1 Writing for Public Relations 

CM415 Public Relations Planning 

CM421 Public Relations Campaigns 

One elective chosen from: 

CM322 Media Relations 

CM323 Publications Editing and Design 

CM324 Public Relations Events and Promotions 

CM423 Crisis Communications Management 

CM450^5 1 Communication Internship 

MKT 1 00 Principles of Marketing 

Speech Communication Minor (15 credits) 

CM206 Communication Theory 
CM327 Persuasion 

One course from the following: 

CM2 1 1 Mass Communication 

CM212 Public Speaking 

CM329 Interpersonal Communication 

Six credits from any Speech Communication or Mass Communication course beyond 
CM 104 (may not include more than 3 credits of practicum) 



268 Programs of Study 



Visual Communication (18 credits) 

The Visual Communication Minor requires any six courses from the foilowingr 



ARTlOl 


Introduction to Art Appreciation 


ARTllO 


Concepts of Design 


ART 134 


Concepts of Computer Graphics 


ART204 


Survey of Western Art I 




OR 


ART205 


Survey of Western Art II 


ART215 


Drawing I 


ART245 


Photography I 


ART246 


Digital Photography 


ART265 


Drawing II 



"Graphic Design majors may NOT minor in Visual Communication. 






DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 



MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM 

Mission Statement 

"*"'; he master of science degree program in Nursing prepares graduates for advanced 
^ practice in the role of adult clinical nurse specialist, nurse anesthetist, adult nurse 
practitioner, or nurse educator. The program builds on undergraduate education and 
is intensive and dynamic. Its aim is to develop advanced knowledge and expertise 
based on critique and application of theory and research. Recognizing that adult 
learners have unique needs and abihties, the program provides flexibility in planning 
coursework and requires student initiative in selecting optimal learning experiences to 
achieve professional goals. 

The post-baccalaureate master's degree program offers the opportunity for ad- 
vanced preparation in the four areas stated above. In addition, the master's program 
offers the option for registered nurses who do not have the baccalaureate degree with 
a major in Nursing to complete the baccalaureate and master's degree within the RN 
to MS Program. 

Admission requirements and detailed program information are available in the 
York College of Pennsylvania Graduate Studies Catalog. Catalogs can be obtained 
from the Admissions Office, Nursing Department Graduate Office, or the Department 
of Nursing Office. Information about the program is also available by visiting www. 
ycp.edu/nursing. , ■" : ' 

Program Outcomes: 

Individuals who have majored in Nursing and who are candidates for the master of 
science degree from York College of Pennsylvania will demonstrate the ability to do 
the following: 

1 . Practice in a leadership role in the clinical setting as clinical nurse specialist, 
adult nurse practitioner, educator, administrator, or nurse anesthetist. 

2. Role model ethical, legal, and professional standards for advanced nursing 
practice. 

3. Integrate advanced knowledge of nursing and related disciplines in the roles 
of clinical nurse specialist, educator, administrator, nurse anesthetist, or adult 
nurse practitioner. 

4. Evaluate and apply nursing research to clinical, educational, or administrative 
settings. 

5. Assume responsibility for self-directed, lifelong learning and for promoting 
the professional development of nursing staff and/or students. 

6. Design strategies to promote health and collaborative relationships with 
members of the health care team. 

7. Act as a resource for other nurses in the areas of clinical practice, outcomes 
and evaluation, professional standards, and other health care issues. 

8. Preparation of graduates to pass national certification examination for CNS, 
nurse educator, nurse anesthetist, or nurse practitioner. 



269 



270 Programs of Study 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAM 

The Department of Nursing offers a baccalaureate degree program that leads to 
a bachelor of science with a major in Nursing. Students are eligible to sit for the 
registered nurse licensing exam at the end of the program. Nursing students at York 
College participate in a rigorous and relevant program of study in the sciences and 
nursing as well as general education courses in the arts, humanities, foreign culture, 
and the behavioral and social sciences. Special programs are available for registered 
nurses and licensed practical nurses. 

The baccalaureate program in nursing is approved by the Pennsylvania State Board 
of Nursing and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The 
Nursing major is a highly structured and academically intensive program. It requires 
motivation, investment of time, and a strong commitment to learning. Desirable pro- 
fessional qualities include aptitude, creativity, self-direction, self-discipline, discretion, 
integrity, tolerance, flexibility, optimistic outlook, and evidence of good physical and 
mental health. 

Students who are admitted to the Nursing major as freshmen without any college 
credits, and who meet the academic requirements per catalog schedule, are assured of 
enrollment in Nursing courses with clinical components. For all other students there 
may be waiting lists for enrollment in Nursing courses with clinical components based 
on date of matriculation into the Nursing major. 

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). One Dupont Circle 
NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, telephone (202) 887-6791 is a resource 
for information regarding tuition, fees, and length of program. This information is 
provided annually to CCNE by the Department of Nursing. 

Graduates of this program, except registered nurses who are already licensed, 
will be eligible to take the examination for licensure as a registered nurse in all 
states. 

It is a policy of the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing not to issue a license to 
an applicant who has been convicted of a felonious act. Persons who have been found 
guilty of felonious acts as listed in the Prohibitive Offenses contained in Act 1 3 of 
1997 will not be admitted to the program. 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Nursing encompasses the following: ■ 

• We are committed to providing high-quality baccalaureate and master's degree 
academic programs that build on a foundation of general education. The general 
education is used to facilitate the development of a broadly educated citizen, to 
support the nursing major and is integrated throughout the program. 

• We are committed to a teaching-learning environment characterized by 
individual attention to students and their learning needs. Classroom and 
clinical experiences are provided to assist students to utilize critical thinking 
and communication skills in the application of theory to their professional and 
personal endeavors. 

• Resources are selected to provide a variety of modes for the student to pursue 



Department of Nursing 271 



both guided and independent learning. These include, but are not limited to, 
group and individual practice in the skills lab, access to audio- visual materials 
and simulated laboratory activities in the learning center, and supervised 
practice with patients in selected clinical sites. 

• We are committed to providing educational opportunities for traditional-aged, 
adult, full-time, part-time, and distance students. 

• We are supportive of the College's commitment to acquiring a diverse student 
body and provide learning experiences that promote cultural awareness. 

• We are attentive to community-expressed needs by preparing practitioners 
who are equipped to practice in a changing health care scene. 

• We are committed to providing an environment that promotes academic honesty, 
personal integrity, and the ability to engage in ethical decision making. 

• We strive to create a climate that puts emphasis on learning as a lifelong 
endeavor. 

Program Outcomes 

Individuals who have majored in Nursing and who are candidates for the bachelor of 
science degree from York College of Pennsylvania will demonstrate the ability to do 
the following: 

1. Use knowledge from the arts, sciences, humanities, and the discipline of 
nursing in nursing practice to assist individuals and groups from diverse 
populations to adapt to changing health states throughout the life span. 

2. Provide safe holistic nursing interventions to individuals and groups in a 
therapeutic manner that acknowledges and accommodates diversity. 

3. Facilitate learning for individuals and groups about health and activities that 
; support a healthy environment. 

4. Use leadership skills and ethical principles to foster and advocate for the 
provision of high-quality nursing services to individuals and groups. 

5. Utilize critical thinking skills to implement the nursing process in a caring 
and professional manner. 

6. Incorporate research and evidence-based findings to advance clinical 
excellence in nursing practice. 

7. Communicate clearly and concisely both verbally and in writing. 

8. Demonstrate use of technology and nursing informatics. 

9. Utilize resources and strategies that support lifelong learning and professional 
growth. 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING POLICIES 

Progression Policies 

Admission to York College of Pennsylvania does not automatically ensure progression 
to a Nursing course with a clinical component, which begins at the second semester of 
the sophomore level. To enroll in the first Nursing course with a clinical component, 
Basic Principles of Nursing (NUR210/211), students must have a 2.8 overall 
cumulative average with a cumulative average of 2.5 in science courses. Students 



272 Programs of Study 



must have completed the following courses with a minimum grade of 2.0: General 
Psychology (PS Y 100), Introduction to Sociology (SOCIOO), Beg. Princ. Gen./Org. 
Chm.(CHM122,123), Biology I (BIO150,BIO151), Human Anatomy and Physiology 
(BIO220, 221), Microbiology (BIO230,231), Human Development and Health Care 
(NUR201), Nutrition in Health Care (NUR202). and the College Common Core 
Requirements, which include Analytical Reading and Writing (WRT102), Academic 
Writing ( WRT202) , Human Communication (CM 1 04) , Information Literacy (IFL 1 1 ) , 
and Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math (MATH 1 ). Anatomy and Physiology 
and Microbiology must be satisfactorily completed (grade 2.0 or higher) no more 
than five years prior to NUR210/211. Faculty strongly recommend that students take 
IFLIOl Information Literacy prior to or concurrently with NUR210/21 1 . In the spring 
semester, Human Anatomy and Physiology may be taken prior to, or concurrently 
with, NUR2 10/211. 

Only Nursing course credits earned in CCNE- and/or NLNAC-accredited 
programs will be considered for transfer into the York College of Pennsylvania Nursing 
program. 

To remain in and progress through the Nursing major, a 2.0 or higher must be 
obtained in each required support and Nursing course and the student must maintain 
a cumulative average of 2.8. To pass all Nursing courses with a clinical component, 
students must achieve a satisfactory grade of 2.0 for both the classroom and clinical 
components of the course. Students who achieve less than a 2.0 in any Nursing 
course will be permitted to repeat the course one time only. Students may fail only 
one Nursing course with a clinical component. A second failure in any Nursing course 
with a clinical component will result in dismissal from the program. Students may 
repeat non-clinical nursing courses (including required laboratory science courses) 
only once. All Nursing courses with clinical components must be completed within 
12 semesters (six years from the time the student started the first nursing course 
with clinical component, NUR210/21I). Students are expected to exhibit personal 
and professional attributes that are consistent with effective Nursing practice. To 
provide safe and effective nursing care during clinical experiences, students must 
demonstrate preparation for the experiences as outlined in course syllabi, and must 
be able to make sound nursing judgments. Students who are not making sound judg- 
ments and who are not providing safe and effective nursing care will be placed 
on probation and may be asked to withdraw from Nursing courses with clinical 
components. 

Interruption in the suggested progression of Nursing courses may result in delay 
in placement in Nursing courses with clinical components. 



Clinical Requirements 

All Nursing majors are expected to adhere to stated Department of Nursing health 
policies. These are required by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing and the 
contractual agencies for clinical experiences. Specific health policies are included in 
the Department of Nursing Student Handbook, which is available in the office of the 
Department of Nursing. 



1 



Department of Nursing 273 



Before the first Nursing course with a clinical component, students are required 
to have physical examinations, dental examinations, and immunizations. Tuberculin 
testing and Basic Life Support (BLS) for the Healthcare Provider provided by the 
American Heart Association is required and must be valid for the entire academic year. 
In addition, students must obtain criminal record clearance from the Pennsylvania State 
Police and a Child Abuse Clearance from the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare. 
Students who have not been Pennsylvania residents for two years prior to their first 
Nursing course with a clinical component must also undergo a Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) background check. All students are required to complete a urine drug 
screening at the lab selected by the Department of Nursing. All clinical requirements 
are due on July 1 for students who will enter clinical in the fall semester and December 
30 for students who will enter clinical in the spring semester. Please allow adequate 
time for the requirements to be completed and submitted to the Department. Students 
who do not submit the necessary reports to the Nursing Department Office by the due 
date will be withdrawn from the Nursing course with a clinical component. Admission 
to a Nursing course v/ith a clinical component the following semester will depend on 
availability of space. 

Students in all Nursing courses with clinical components must have current 
Tuberculin testing, Basic Life Support (BLS) for the Healthcare Provider, criminal 
background checks. Child Abuse Clearance, and FBI checks updated yearly that will 
not expire during the semester. All clinical requirements are due on July 1 for the fall 
semester and December 30 for the spring semester. Students who do not submit the 
necessary reports to the Nursing Department Office by the stated due date will be 
withdrawn from the Nursing course with a clinical component. Admission to a nursing 
course with a clinical component the following semester will depend on availability 
of space. 

Transportation 

All students must provide their own transportation to all Nursing practice facilities 
beginning with the sophomore year. Students must abide by agency parking 
regulations. 

Liability Insurance 

Liability insurance is required for all students who are enrolled in Nursing courses 
with clinical components and is payable to the College Business Office. 

Uniforms 

Uniforms must be worn during planned nursing practice assignments supervised by 
York College Nursing faculty. Specific uniform policies and requirements are stated 
in the Department of Nursing Student Handbook and are discussed at the beginning of 
the first Nursing course with a clinical component. Students must purchase uniforms 
and laboratory supplies in preparation for clinical experiences. 



274 Programs of Study 



Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Nursing 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Nursing must complete a minimum 
of 132 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.8, satisfy the College's 
residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements of the 
College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken 
on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, Nursing majors must achieve a grade of 2.0 or higher in all required 
courses in the major. 

The required courses for the Nursing IVIaJor are: 

PSYIOO General Psychology* 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology* 

CHM122 Beg.Prin.Gen./Org.Chm 

CHM123 Beg.Prin.Gen./Org.ChmLab 

BIO 150 Biology I 

BI0151 Biology I Lab 

BIO220 Anatomy and Physiology I 

BI022 1 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 

BI0222 Anatomy and Physiology II 

BI0223 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 

BIO230 Microbiology 

BI0231 Microbiology Lab 

BEH260 Statistics 

NUR201 Human Development and Health Care 

NUR202 Nutrition in Health 

NUR210/21 1 Basic Principles in Nursing Practice** 

NUR300 Pharmacology for Nurses 

NUR3 14 Research and Professional Nursing Practice 

NUR340/341 Nursing Concepts and Practice: 

Adults with Chronic Health Problems 

NUR350/35 1 Nursing Concepts and Practice: Women's Health 

NUR352/353 Nursing Concepts and Practice: 

Children with Acute Health Problems 

NUR400/401 Nursing Concepts and Practice: Community Health 

NUR422/423 Nursing Concepts and Practice: Psychiatric/Mental Health 

NUR440/441 Nursing Concepts and Practice: 

Adults with Acute Health Problems 

NUR450/45 1 Nursing Practicum 

NUR460 Leadership in Professional Nursing 



*Courses also meet the Area Distribution Requirements. 
**Note prerequisites stated in narrative. 



Department of Nursing 275 
Nursing (suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year 


Credits 


Analytical Reading and Writing 

Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math 


3 
3 


General Psychology 
Introduction to Sociology 


3 
3 


Beg. Prin. Gen. /Org. Chemistry 
Biology I 


4 
4 


Area I Distribution Requirement 
Human Communication 


3 
3 


Information Literacy 
Physical Education 
Free Elective 


2 
1 
3 




32 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Academic Writing 


3 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 
Area V Distribution Requirement 
Anatomy and Physiology I and II 
Microbiology 


3 
3 
8 
4 


Nutrition 


3 


Human Development 

Basic Principles 

Health Assessments for Professional Nursing Practice 


3 
5 

3 


Physical Education 


I 
36 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Area I Distribution Requirement 
Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 
3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 
Pharmacology for Nurses . ; . . 


3 
3 


Nursing Concepts and Practice: 

Adults with Chronic Health Problems 


6 


Statistics 


3 


Nursing Concepts and Practice: Women's Health 


3 


Nursing Concepts and practice: 

Children with Acute Health Problems 


3 


Research and Professional Nursing 


3 


Free Electives 


3 




33 



276 Programs of Study 



Senior Year Credits 

Concepts and Practice: Community Health (1st semester) 7 
Concepts and Practice: 

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing ( 1 st semester) 5 
Concepts and Practice: 

Adults with Acute Health Problems (2nd semester) 7 

Leadership in Professional Nursing (2nd semester) 3 

Nursing Practicum (2nd semester) 3 

Free Electives 6 

3l 

Advanced Placement for the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) 
and the Registered Nurse (RN) 

Nurses who graduated from a NLNAC-accredited program, hold a Pennsylvania RN 
or LPN license to practice nursing, and meet program admission requirements are 
eligible for direct articulation into the Nursing program. This allows the student to 
progress without repetition of previously learned knowledge. 

Program of Study for the Licensed Practical Nurse A 

Licensed practical nurses who are granted advanced placement must maintain a current 
license issued by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing. LPNs may earn credit for 
the sophomore-level (200) nursing courses when they complete NUR220 Concepts in 
Professional Nursing for the Licensed Practical Nurse. 

Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program for Registered Nurses 

The Department of Nursing offers a program that facilitates the progress of the 
registered nurse student who wishes to obtain the baccalaureate degree. The program 
offers flexibility; advanced placement credit for NUR201, NUR202, NUR210/211, 
NUR300, NUR340/341, NUR350/351, NUR352/353, NUR400/401, NUR422/423, 
and NUR440/441; acceptance of transfer courses earned prior to admission; and 
opportunity to earn Common Core and Area Distribution Requirement credits through 
CLEP examinations. 

Student records will be assessed individually for program planning of necessary 
requirements. Registered nurse licensure in Pennsylvania is required. Students are also 
required to show evidence of having purchased liability insurance. 

Students must complete the following at York College of Pennsylvania: 
NUR320 Health Assessment for Registered Nurses 
NUR321 Transitional Concepts for Registered Nurses 
NUR331 Alternative and Complimentary 

Therapies in Nursing and Healthcare 
NUR332 Research Concepts for Registered Nurses 
NUR42 1 Leadership Concepts for Registered Nurses 
NUR456/457 Community Health Concepts and Issues for Registered Nurses 



Department of Nursing 277 

RN-MS Degree Program 

The RN-MS program of study is designed for registered nurses who do not have a 
baccalaureate degree in nursing but possess the academic background, desire, and 
abiUty to pursue preparation at the master's level. The curriculum combines elements 
of the BS program for RNs with the master's program and streamlines progression 
toward the master's degree. 

RN-MS students enter as undergraduate seniors, having earned at least 127 credits 
including all baccalaureate-level work. Forty-one additional credits are required for a 
master of science degree. Bachelor's/master's overlap courses account for four credits 
of the total credits required for the master's program. 

Detailed information about the RN-MS program of study and its admission 
requirements can be found in the York College of Pennsylvania Graduate Studies 
Catalog. 




DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 



Students who pursue one of the majors in the Physical Sciences Department will 
gain the skills that are increasingly demanded in today's highly technical world. It 
is the mission of the Physical Sciences Department to prepare students for a career in a 
scientific and/or technical field by developing their professional fitness, their proficiency 
with the problem-solving techniques of mathematics and science, and their expertise in 
using modern equipment and software. In keeping with the mission of the College to 
prepare students for their professional careers, our major programs also incorporate a 
variety of real- world projects, such as co-ops and internships, with our partners in local 
industry. The reward for the dedication and hard work required for successful comple- 
tion of a major in this department is the key to enter the technical/professional world— in 
business or industry, in education, or further study in graduate school. 

The Physical Sciences Department offers programs leading to the bachelor of 
science degree with majors in Chemistry, Clinical Laboratory Science, Computer 
Science, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Engineering Management, Forensic 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Secondary Education-General 
Science, and Secondary Education-Mathematics. The Clinical Laboratory Science 
program includes three years of classroom and laboratory instruction followed by one 
year of hospital clinical study. (Two-year programs leading to the associate of science 
degree are offered in Chemistry and Physics.) 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry 

The Chemistry Major is designed to prepare students as professionals for graduate or 
professional studies or for employment as a chemist. The program of study follows 
guidelines outlined by the American Chemical Society. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Chemistry must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Chemistry must earn a 2.0 in all major courses. 

The courses required for the Chemistry Major are: 

Common Core Requirements (17 credit hours) 

WRT102 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) J 

WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 1 

CM 104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MAT171 Calculus I (4) (fulfills core mathematics requirement) 
Physical Education (2) 



278 



Department of Physical Sciences 279 



Area Distribution Requirements (24 credit hours) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6) 

Area IV: AmericanAVestem Civilization and Government (6) 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives (13-15 credits) 

Required Major Courses (68-70 credits) 

CHM 1 30 First-year Chemistry Colloquium 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I* 

CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II* OR 

CHM 1 46 Advanced Chemistry II 

CHM 150 Introductory Seminar in Computers for Chemists 

CHM 152 Introductory Seminar in Chemistry Issues, 
Ethics, and Experimental Design 

PHY 1 10 General Physics (Mechanics and Heat) OR 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 

PHYl 12 General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) OR 

PHY 162 Engineering Physics (Heat, Thermodynamics, and Sound) 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

CHM236 Organic Chemistry II 

MAT 172 Calculus II 

MAT271 Calculus III 

MAT272 Differential Equations 

CHM336 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 

CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

CHM344 Physical Chemistry I 

CHM346 Physical Chemistry II 

CHM444 Inorganic Chemistry 

CHM45 1 Capstone Laboratory Experience 

CHM481 Independent Study 

PSC474 Physical Science Seminar 

One course from the following: 

CHM434 Advanced Organic Chemistry 



CHM482 

CHM498 

CHM350/BIO350 



Independent Study 
Chemistry Internship 
Biochemistry 



*Fulfill Area III Distribution Requirements. 



280 Programs of Study 



Chemistry (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 



First Year Chemistry Colloquium 


I 


General Chemistry I 


4 


Advanced Chemistry II 


5 


Introductory Seminar in Computers for Chemists 


1 


Physics 


8 


Calculus I and II 


8 


Analytical Reading and Writing 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 


Physical Education 


1 




33 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Organic Chemistry 8 
Introductory Seminar in Chemistry Issues, Ethics, 

and Experimental Design 1 

Calculus III 4 

Differential Equations 4 

Academic Writing 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 1 

33 

Junior Year , Credits 

Physical Chemistry 8 

Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 4 

Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 4 

Capstone Laboratory Experience 1 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirements 6 

32 

Senior Year Credits 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Physical Sciences Seminar 3 

Independent Study 3 

Chemistry Elective 3-4 

Free Electives 13-15 

27-29 



Department of Physical Sciences 281 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Clinical Laboratory Science 

Students pursuing a B.S. in Clinical Laboratory Science (CLS) complete three years 
of study at the College followed by a fourth clinical year of study in a hospital pro- 
gram for clinical laboratory science or medical technology. The hospital program must 
be accredited by NAACLS. the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory 
Science. 

A clinical laboratory scientist performs tests under the direction of pathologists, 
physicians, or scientists who specialize in clinical chemistry, microbiology, hematol- 
ogy, diagnosis of disease, and other clinical fields. Upon attaining the B.S. degree and 
passing the National Registry Examination, the clinical laboratory scientist is qualified 
to work in medical laboratories in hospitals or private facilities, research laboratories, 
industrial laboratories, and in a variety of other laboratory positions. 

Application to hospital programs is initiated by the student during the summer be- 
fore the junior year. Students arrange with the Clinical Laboratory Science Coordinator 
to apply for the senior clinical year, and the College assists students throughout the 
selection process. While qualified applicants normally are accepted into a clinical year 
program, the College cannot guarantee acceptance. Selection criteria used by hospitals 
for clinical year candidates include student's cumulative GPA, letters of recommen- 
dation, personal interviews, and college affiliation. For more details, see Requirements 
for Graduation, which follow. 

Should a student elect not to continue in the Clinical Laboratory Science Program 
or not be admitted to the hospital-based professional program, the student can change 
majors or reapply the following year. 

The clinical year is normally a 12-month program beginning in August of a 
student's senior year. Students will register with the College during the clinical year 
of study; however, no tuition is remitted to the College. The College Financial Aid 
Office remains available for assistance to students for paying tuition costs to the Clin- 
ical Laboratory Science Program. Students are permitted to participate in the formal 
spring graduation ceremony at the College even though the clinical year program is 
still in progress. 

York College is affiliated with York Hospital, York, PA; St. Christopher's Hospital 
for Children, Philadelphia, PA; Lancaster General College of Nursing and Health 
Science, Lancaster, PA; Morristown General Hospital, Morristown, NJ; and WCA 
Hospital, Jamestown, NY. The programs of study vary somewhat with each hospital. 
Students may pursue the senior clinical year of study at the affiliate hospitals or 
NAACLS-accredited non-affiliate programs. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Clinical Laboratory Science must 
complete a minimum of 129 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 
2.0, satisfy the College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education 
Requirements of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Require- 
ments may not be taken on a pass/fail basis, and credits earned in WRTIOO may not be 
applied to degree requirements. 



282 Programs of Study 



In addition, students majoring in Clinical Laboratory Science must apply to a hos- 
pital clinical laboratory science or medical technology school (NAACLS accreditation 
required) in the summer before the junior year, for admission to the senior clinical 
year program. A minimum 2.5 grade point average is required for eligibility; however, 
students are encouraged to maintain a 3 .0 grade point average in order to be competitive 
for admission to the senior year programs. All General Education Requirements and 
all required courses for the major (except CLS401-6) must be completed before the 
student enters the clinical year. 

The courses required for the Clinical Laboratory Science Major are: 

Common Core Requirements (16 credit hours) 

WRT 1 02 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM 104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MAT 120 Applied Calculus (3) (fulfills core mathematics requirement) 
Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements (24 credit hours) 
Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6) 
Area IV: AmericanAVestern Civilization and Government (6) 
Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives (12 credits) 

Required science courses during the three years of study on campus (45 credits) 

BIO 100 Introduction to Allied Health 

BIO 150 Biology I 

BIO220 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

BI0222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

BIO230 Microbiology 

BIO240 Genetics 

BI0354 Immunology 

BIO350/CHM350 Biochemistry 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

Required courses during the clinical year (32 credits) 

CLS40I Clinical Microbiology 

CLS402 Clinical Chemistry 

CLS403 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation 



Department of Physical Sciences 283 



CLS404 Clinical Immunohematology 
CLS405 Clinical Immunology/Serology 
CLS406 Clinical Seminar 

Clinical Laboratory Science (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing ^ 

Academic Writing 

Human Communications ^ 

Information Literacy 

Introduction to Allied Health 1 

Biology I 

General Chemistry I and II ^ 

Microbiology 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Area II Distribution Requirements _A 

34 



Sophomore Year Credits^ 

Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II 

Genetics 

Organic Chemistry 

Applied Calculus 

Physical Education 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 3 

Elective 



_3 
30 



Junior Year Credits 

4 
Biochemistry 

Immunology 

Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 4 

Area I Distribution Requirements , 6 

Area II Distribution Requirement , ^ 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

9 
Elective s — 

33 

Senior Year ^'^^its 

Clinical year of study in an NAACLS-approved program. 

Credits for individual courses may vary with program. 

The courses include: Clinical Microbiology. Clinical 

Chemistry .Clinical Hematology/Coagulation, Clinical 

Immunohematology, Clinical Immunology/Serology, 

Clinical Seminar 32 



284 Programs of Study 



Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science 

York College offers a full spectrum of academic opportunities for students interested 
in pursuing a career in the fast-growing and ever-changing field of computing. The 
B.S. degree in Computer Science (CS) offered by the Physical Sciences Department is 
designed for those pursuing computing careers in a technical or scientific field. York 
College also offers the B.S. degree in Computer Information Systems (CIS) through 
the Business Department for those pursuing business computing careers. Consistent 
with the mission of the College to help students prepare for their post-graduate careers, 
the CS Program blends the practical with the theoretical. In their final year of study, 
students put together the technical, theoretical, and practical aspects of their computer 
science education through industry internships and/or upper-level projects and a 
required senior design project. 

The Computer Science Program at York College is built on guidelines recommended 
by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Computer Society (lEEE-CS) and 
the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). The Computer Science program in 
the Department of Physical Sciences at York College is accredited by the Computing 
Accreditation Commission of ABET. Ill Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 
21202-4012, telephone (410) 347-7700. 

The Computer Science Program is designed with the following long-term 
educational objectives for alumni of the Program: 

• To have a solid and rigorous background in computer science principles, including 
the requisite theoretical foundations and problem-solving skills, to succeed in 
industry or pursue advanced graduate studies; 

• To develop the effective verbal and written communication skills needed for 
successful collaboration in team software development environments; and 

• To act as a contributing member of the computing profession in society at large. 

To facilitate these objectives, the CS Program has adopted the following educational 
outcomes for its graduates from the 2008-2009 ABET Criteria for Accrediting 
Computing Programs: 

a. An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to 
the discipline 

b. An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing 
requirements appropriate to its solution 

c. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, 
process, component, or program to meet desired needs 

d. An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal 

e. An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues 
and responsibilities 

f. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences 

g. An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, 
organizations, and society 



Department of Physical Sciences 285 



h. Recognition ot the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional 

development 
i. An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing 

practice 
j. An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and 

computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based 

systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved 

in design choices 
k. An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of 

software systems of varying complexity 
I. A working knowledge and basic competency in a specialized area, achieving 

depth as well as breadth of abilities 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Computer Science must complete a 
minimum of 125 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis, and credits earned in WRTIOO may not be applied to degree 
requirements . 

In addition, students majoring in Computer Science must achieve a grade of 2.0 
or higher in all major requirements. At least four 300-400 level courses and one pro- 
gramming language course must be taken at York College. 

The required courses for the Computer Science Major are: 

Common Core Requirements (17 credit hours) 

WRT102 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM 104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MAT171 Calculus I (4) 

Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements (24 credit hours) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6) 

Area IV: American/Western Civilization and Government (6) 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives (12 credits) 

Science and Mathematics Component (25-28 credits) 

PHY160/[PHY162 or PHY260 or PHY262] OR CHM134/136 

ORBIO150/152(8-10) 

Additional four-credit Area III Lab Science (4) 



286 Programs of Study 



MAT 172 Calculus II (4) 
MAT235 Discrete Mathematics (3) 
MAT350 Probability and Statistics (3) 

MAT260 Linear Algebra (3) OR MAT27 1 Calculus III (4) OR MAT272 
Differential Equations (4) 

Computer Science Component (35-36 credits) 

CSIOO CPADS(2) 

CS 1 1 Fundamentals of Computer Science 1(2) 

CS201 Fundamentals of Computer Science 11 (4) 

CS320 Software Engineering and Design (3) 

CS340 Programming Language Design (3) 

CS350 Data Structures (3) 

CS360 Analysis of Algorithms (3) 

CS420 Operating Systems (3) 

CS456 Social & Professional Issues in Computing (3) 

CS48 1 Senior Software Project I (3) 

IFS325 Introduction to Networks (3) 

ECE260 Fundamentals of Computer Engineering (4) OR IFS350 
Hardware/Software Architectures (3) 

Computer Science Electives (12 credits) 

Four of the following: 

CS370 Computer Graphics Programming I 

CS482 Senior Software Project II 

CS490 CS Internship I 

CS495^97 Special Topics in Computer Science 

CS498 Independent Study 

ECE370 Microprocessor System Design 

IFS335 Advanced Network Design 

IFS460 Database Management Systems 

MAT391 Cryptology 

CS/MAT470 Numerical Analysis 



Computer Science (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

CPADS 2 

Calculus I 4 

ADR III Lab Science 4 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Fundamentals of CS 1 2 

Calculus II 4 

ADR III Lab Science 4 



Department of Physical Sciences 287 



Academic Writing 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 




31 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Fundamentals of CS II 


4 


Discrete Mathematics 


3 


Area III Lab Science 


4 


Free Elective 


3 


Physical Education 


1 


Software Engineering and Design 


3 


Data Structures 


3 


Fundamentals of CE OR Hardware/Software Arch. 


3 


Linear Algebra OR Calculus III OR Differential Equations 3-4 


Human Communication 


3 




30-32 


Junior Year 


Credits 


Programming Language Design 


3 


CS Elective 


3 


Probability and Statistics 


3 


Introduction to Networks 


3 


Area Distribution Requirements 


6 


Analysis of Algorithms 


3 


CS Elective 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


Area Distribution Requirements 


6 


Physical Education 


1 




34 


Senior Year , ^ 


Credits 


Senior Software Project I . . 


3 


Operating Systems 


3 


CS Elective 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


Area Distribution Requirement 


3 


Social & Professional Issues in Computing 


3 


CS Elective 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


Area Distribution Requirements 


6 




30 



Engineering at York College 

Engineers are problem solvers. They synthesize ideas, make decisions, design 
systems, and create solutions to problems, all subject to a diverse set of real- world 
constraints. In addition to performance factors, these constraints include economic and 



288 Programs of Study 



environmental issues , safety, timeliness , reliability, ethics , aesthetics , and social impact . 
Engineers must understand the implications and interaction of these constraints within 
the framework of our technology-dependent society. Engineering has long played a 
key role in adapting scientific knowledge to societal needs. In virtually every sector of 
our economy, engineers draw upon mathematics and basic science to design machines, 
processes, and systems of all types. 

At York College, students pursue bachelor of science degrees in Computer 
Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. These three 
disciplines encompass an extraordinarily wide range of technical work, including 
machine design, HVAC, electromechanical power conversion, automated 
manufacturing, robotics, telecommunications, embedded control systems, and 
microprocessor design. 

Engineering majors at York College participate in a rigorous and relevant program 
of study in science, mathematics, and engineering, as well as general education courses 
in the arts, humanities, foreign culture, and the behavioral and social sciences. The 
engineering component of the program, in addition to being academically rigorous, 
places strong emphasis on hands-on experience and the art of engineering design. 
The curriculum provides for both breadth and depth through required and elective 
Engineering courses. 

All Engineering majors also complete three semesters of salaried professional 
work through the Engineering Cooperative Education ("co-op") Program. The 
Program is supported in part by an active partnership of regional industrial and 
business organizations. This partnership provides financial resources for engineering 
scholarships and laboratory development, and co-op opportunities for students. It also 
provides for ongoing interaction with practicing engineers and engineering managers 
to assure a relevant curriculum of the highest standards. 

All Engineering students undergo regular exposure to the profession and practice 
of engineering. This occurs through client- and national society-based design projects 
as well as through involvement with professional societies including seminars, field 
trips, dinner meetings, and student-chapter activities. 

Career options for York College Engineering graduates cover the range from 
entry-level engineering positions in industry and business to advanced study leading to 
graduate degrees. A multitude of options exists in industry, including product research 
and development in both the consumer and commercial sectors; automated system 
design and process control in manufacturing; materials characterization and engineering; 
power generation, transmission, conversion, utilization, and management; design of 
portable electronic devices for communication and entertainment; microprocessor- 
based intelligent systems and materials; and the design of microprocessors. York 
College Engineering graduates may also pursue graduate study in engineering or other 
fields such as business, law, or medicine. 

York College is committed to providing its Engineering majors with the highest 
quality educational experience possible. Our programs feature small classes and labs 
taught by full-time faculty, closeness with faculty and fellow students both within 
and beyond the academic realm, and a rich and open relationship with the faculty and 
student body as a whole. 



Department of Physical Sciences 289 



Accreditation 



The Mechanical Engineering program is fully accredited under the most current criteria 
(EC2000) of the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

The Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering programs of York College 
are not accredited at this time; however, they are designed to meet the program criteria 
set forth by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering Technology (ABET). 

Mission Statement 

In the belief that engineering is both a social and technical profession, the Engineering 
programs at York College are committed to preparing engineers to practice their 
profession in the face of challenges — both known and unknown— that are many 
and diverse. Engineers preparing for work in the coming decades will be required to 
contend with an ever-increasing pace of change, an explosion of information, and the 
globalization of economies and technology. They will need an increased awareness of, 
and ability to deal with, environmental and national priorities, and an understanding 
of, and appreciation for, the human condition. 

In our effort to prepare students to meet these and other challenges for the exciting 
and unknown road ahead, our Engineering programs, consistent with their origin and 
institutional mission, are dedicated to providing their Engineering graduates with the 
knowledge and skills necessary to successfully practice their chosen profession, to 
pursue graduate study in engineering or other fields, and to inspire a passion for life- 
long learning. 

Criteria for Admission 

Criteria for admission as an Engineering major at York College include satisfactory 
evaluation of the following: 

1. High school academic performance including class rank and quality of 
courses taken 

2. Minimum high school (or equivalent) preparation will include 

a. Three years of laboratory science (physics strongly recommended) 

b. Four years of mathematics normally covering elementary and intermediate 
algebra, plane geometry, and trigonometry 

c. Four years of English 

3. SAT or ACT scores 

4. High school recommendations 

5. Personal qualities and extracurricular record 

Transfer Students 

Students who have successfully completed (or are in the process of completing) the 
A.S. degree in engineering science at two-year institutions or who wish to transfer 
to York College from other four-year institutions may apply for admission to study 



290 Programs of Study 



engineering at York College. Transfer applicants must submit a completed application 
form and official transcripts from each college attended. Admission is considered on a 
case-by-case basis. Interviews are optional but encouraged. 

Graduation Requirements 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Computer, Electrical, and 
Mechanical Engineering must (i) achieve a grade of 2 .0 or higher in courses required 
for the major, (ii) achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher, (iii) satisfactorily 
complete three full semesters of co-op, (iv) satisfy the College's residency 
requirement, and (v) complete the General Education Requirements of the College. 
Students majoring in Computer or Electrical Engineering must complete a minimum 
of 143 total credits while those majoring in Mechanical Engineering must complete 
a minimum of 141 credits. 

Engineering Curriculum 

The curriculum provides a balance of courses in three areas: 

1 . Science, mathematics, and basic engineering 

2. Fine arts and humanities, international studies/foreign language, 
American/Western civilization and American government, and the 
behavioral and social sciences 

3. Professional engineering practice including a significant component of open- 
ended design problems and three semesters of industry-based co-op 

Required Courses for all Engineering majors: 

Common Core Requirements ( 1 7 credit hours) 

WRT102 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM 104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MAT171 Calculus I (4) 

Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements (24 credit hours) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6) 

Area IV: American/Western Civilization and Government (6) 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Science and Mathematics Requirements (27 credit hours) 

CHM134 General Chemistry I (3) 

CHM 1 35 General Chemistry I Lab ( 1 ) 

CS 1 1 Fundamentals of Computer Science 1(2) 

EGR240 Mathematical Methods for Engineers (3) 



Department of Physical Sciences 291 



PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics) (4) 

PHY 1 6 1 Engineering Physics Lab (Mechanics) ( 1 ) 

PHY260 Engineering Physics (Electricity & Magnetism) (4) 

PHY26 1 Engineering Physics Lab (E & M) ( 1 ) 

MAT 172 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (4) 

MAT272 Differential Equations (4) 

General Engineering Requirements (17 credit hours) 

EGRIOO Engineering Practice and Design Studio (EPADS) I (2) 

EGR102 Engineering Practice and Design Studio (EPADS) II (2) 

EGR290 Engineering Career Training Preparation ( 1 ) 

ECE400/ME400 Capstone Design I (3) 

ECE402/ME402 Capstone Design II (3) 

EGR491 Co-op I (2) 

EGR492 Co-op II (2) 

EGR493 Co-op III (2) 

Additional Computer Engineering Requirements (58 credit hours) 

CS20I Fundamentals of Computer Science II (4) 

CS360 Analysis of Algorithms (3) 

CS420 Operating Systems (3) 

ECE220 Design & Analysis of Digital Circuits (4) 

ECE235 Computations in Discrete Mathematics ( 1 ) 

ECE260 Fundamentals of Computer Engineering (4) 

ECE270 Waves & Optics (3) 

ECE280 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering (4) 

ECE310 Design & Analysis of Analog Circuits (4) 

ECE332 Introduction to Signal Processing (4) 

ECE340 Random Signals (3) 

ECE370 Microprocessor System Design (3) 

ECE420 Embedded System Design (3) 

One upper-division ECE Stem Elective sequence (6) 

Plus three of the following Engineering Electives (9) 

CS320, 340; ECE350, 360, 380, 410. 430, 446, 450, 454 
ECE470, 472, 474, 476, 478, 480, 482; EGR342, 392, 442, 490 

Additional Electrical Engineering Requirements (58 credit hours) 

CS20I Fundamentals of Computer Science II (4) 

EGR342 System Modeling and Analysis (3) 

ECE220 Design & Analysis of Digital Circuits (4) 

ECE235 Computations in Discrete Mathematics (1) 

ECE260 Fundamentals of Computer Engineering (4) 

ECE270 Waves & Optics (3) 

ECE280 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering (4) 

ECE310 Design & Analysis of Analog Circuits (4) 



292 Programs of Study 



ECE332 Introduction to Signal Processing (4) 
ECE340 Random Signals (3) 
ECE350 Electromagnetic Fields (3) 

Two upper-division ECE Stem Elective sequences (12) 

Plus three of the following Engineering Electives (9) 

CS420; ECE360, 370, 380, 410, 420, 430, 446. 450, 454 
ECE470, 472, 474, 476, 478, 480, 482; EGR392, 442, 490 

Upper-division ECE Stem Elective sequences 

ECE360andECE410 
ECE370 and ECE420 
ECE380 and ECE430 
EGR392 and EGR442 

Additional Mechanical Engineering Requirements (56 credit hours) 

ECE280 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering (4) 

EGR342 System Modeling and Analysis (3) 

EGR305 Statistical Design and Process Control (3) 

ME250 Statics (3) 

ME252 Dynamics and Vibration (4) 

ME260 Materials Science (3) 

ME261 Materials Science Laboratory (1) 

ME264 Strength of Materials (3) 

ME265 Materials and Solids Laboratory (1) 

ME320 Thermodynamics (4) 

ME 351 Instrumentation and Microprocessor Lab (1) 

ME360 Fluid Mechanics (3) 

ME361 Thermo/Fluids Laboratory (1) 

ME380 Machine Design (4) 

ME410 Heat Transfer (4) 

ME41 1 Thermal System Design (2) 

Four Engineering Electives (12) 

Engineering Suggested Course Sequences 

All Engineering majors have a common set of suggested courses in the freshman year. 
All Computer and Electrical Engineering majors also have a common set of suggested 
courses in the sophomore year. 



Computer Engineering 

Freshman Year 

Fall 

Calculus I 

General Chemistry I 

Analytical Reading and Writing 



Credits 

4 
4 
3 



Department of Physical Sciences 293 

EPADS I 2 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1 

I? 
Spring 

Calculus II 4 

Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 5 

Academic Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

EPADS II 2 

Fundamentals of Computer Science I 2 

Is 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Fall 

Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 5 

Fundamentals of Computer Science II 4 

Design & Analysis of Digital Circuits 4 

Computations in Discrete Mathematics 1 

Engineering Career Seminar 1 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

' Is 

Spring 

Mathematical Methods in Electrical Engineering 3 

Fundamentals of Computer Engineering 4 

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 4 

Waves and Optics 3 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 1 



1! 



Summer 
Co-op I 



Junior Year ' '' Credits 

Fall 

Design & Analysis of Analog Circuits ' 4 

Introduction to Signal Processing 4 

Operating Systems 3 

Differential Equations 4 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Is 

Spring 

Co-op II 2 



294 Programs of Study 



Summer 

Capstone Design I 3 

Random Signals 3 

Microprocessor System Design 3 

ECE Stem Elective 3 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

l5 

Senior Year Credits 

Fall 

Co-op III 2 

Spring 

Capstone Design II 3 

Embedded System Design 3 

Analysis of Algorithms 3 

ECE Stem Elective 3 

Area Distribution Requirements 6 

Is 

Summer 

Engineering Electives 9 

Area Distribution Requirements 6 

Electrical Engineering 

Freshman Year Credits 
Fall 

Calculus I 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

EPADS I 2 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1 

I? 
Spring 

Calculus II 4 

Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 5 

Academic Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

EPADS II 2 

Fundamentals of Computer Science I 2 

Is 



Department of Physical Sciences 295 

Sophomore Year Credits 
Fall 

Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 5 

Fundamentals of Computer Science II 4 

Design & Analysis of Digital Circuits 4 

Computations in Discrete Mathematics 1 

Engineering Career Seminar 1 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Is 

Spring 

Mathematical Methods in Electrical Engineering 3 

Fundamentals of Computer Engineering 4 

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 4 

Waves and Optics 3 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 1 



18 



Summer 
Co-op I 



Junior Year Credits 
Fall 

Design & Analysis of Analog Circuits 4 

Introduction to Signal Processing 4 

System Modeling and Analysis 3 

Differential Equations 4 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

18 
Spring 

Co-op II .^ ,, ,. 2 

Summer ■>/' • 

Capstone Design I 3 

Random Signals tii.(- . r, 3 

Electromagnetic Fields 3 

ECE Stem Electives _6 

15 

Senior Year Credits 

Fall 

Co-op III 2 



296 Programs of Study 



Spring 

Capstone Design II 3 

ECE Stem Electives 6 

Area Distribution Requirements 9 

Is 

Summer 

Engineering Electives 9 

Area Distribution Requirements 6 

15 

Mechanical Engineering 

Freshman Year Credits 
Fall 

Calculus I 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

EPADS I 2 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education 1 

l7 
Spring 

Calculus II 4 

Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 5 

Academic Writing 3 

Information Literacy 2 

EPADS II 2 

Fundamentals of Computer Science I _7^ 

Is 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Fall 

Differential Equations 4 

Statics 3 

Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 5 

Area Distribution Requirement 3 

Human Communication 3 

Is 

Spring 

Mathematical Methods for Engineers 3 

Thermodynamics 4 

Strength of Materials 3 

Materials & Solids Lab I 

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 4 

Engineering Career Seminar 1 

Physical Education _1_ 

Tv 



Department of Physical Sciences 297 



Summer Credits 

Co-op I 2 

Junior Year Credits 

Fall 

Fluid Mechanics 3 

Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

Dynamics and Vibration 4 

System Modeling and Analysis 3 

Instrumentation and Microprocessor Lab 1 

Area Distribution Requirements _6 

Is 

Spring Credits 

Co-op II 2 

Summer ' Credits 

Machine Design 4 

Materials Science 3 

Materials Science Lab 1 

Capstone Design I 3 

Engineering Elective Ji_ 

14 

Senior Year Credits 

Fall 

Co-op III 2 

Spring Credits 

Capstone Design II 3 

Heat Transfer 4 

Thermal System Design 2 

Engineering Elective . . ^ 

Area Distribution Requirements _6 

18 

Summer Credits 

Statistical Design and Process Control 3 

Engineering Electives 6 

Area Distribution Requirements 6 

Is 

Engineering Cooperative Work Experience (Co-op) 

Engineering cooperative work experience is a requirement for all Engineering students 
at York College. Through this program, students have the opportunity to gain practical 
hands-on experience in industry and other engineering-related enterprises prior to 



298 Programs of Study 



graduation. After their first two years of study, students alternate academic semesters 
with paid professional engineering work experience in industry. Three semesters of 
co-op (six credits) are required for graduation. This requirement may be waived for 
students with a history of qualified engineering work. 

The successful co-op experience is based upon the three-way interaction involving 
the co-op student, the employer-based engineering mentor, and the student's faculty 
advisor. During the student's cooperative work experience, this interaction is nurtured 
and documented through regular meetings with the engineering mentor, on-site visits 
by the faculty advisor, written assessments and evaluations by both mentor and advisor, 
and student co-op reports. 

Students are free to choose any geographic location for co-op and are encouraged to 
seek co-op opportunities abroad with U.S. -based companies that carry out international 
engineering operations. Locally, a sizable group of industrial companies (see I AC on 
following page) advises and supports the development of the Engineering programs, 
and provides co-op employment opportunities for York College Engineering students. 
Students who co-op locally have the option to use York College housing during their 
co-op periods, during which time standard room charges apply. 

Students must register for all three semesters of co-op. Co-op credit cannot be 
awarded to unregistered students. Co-op begins for all Engineering majors during the 
summer between their sophomore and junior years. To be eligible for co-op, a student 
must have a GPA of 2 .0 or higher and have completed a minimum of 64 credit hours 
of coursework. All Engineering students must complete six credits of co-operative 
work experience . 

In addition to helping the student prepare for more sophisticated academic work, 
co-op provides the student with: 

1 . the opportunity to explore career options in a real-world context; 

2. a knowledge of ;the world of business and work; 

3. a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the linkage between 
coursework and engineering practice, thus contributing positively to the 
student's attitude toward academic work; 

4. the opportunity to develop and enhance interpersonal skills; ■ 

5. a salary to help meet college expenses; ■ 

6. a better understanding of the engineering profession through early association 
with practicing engineers; and 

7. an edge in the job market upon graduation. 

Note: Co-op wage scales and benefits are set by individual employers in accordance 
with current market conditions. 

Partnership With Industry 

Industry Advisory Council (I AC): The Engineering programs at York College 
enjoy a close and active relationship with local industry. An lAC helps to support 
and implement the programs at York College. Part of the I AC charter is to provide 



Department of Physical Sciences 299 



significant capital resources for engineering laboratory facilities and scholarships, as 
well as co-op opportunities for York's Engineering students. 

Members of the lAC include: Adhesives Research; American Hydro; BAE Systems; 
Black & Decker; Buchart Horn Inc/Basco Associates; Cooper Tools/Campbell 
Operations; Donsco, Inc.; The Engineering Society of York; FCI Electronics; Harley- 
Davidson, Inc.; Johnson Controls. Inc.. KBA North America; Kinsley Construction 
Co.; LWB Refractories; Metso Minerals; New Standard Corporation; Pall Corporation; 
Topflight Corp; Tyco Electronics; Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation. Inc.; 
Weldon Solutions. Inc; and The York Water Company. 

Industrial Curriculum Advisory Board (ICAB): An outgrowth of the lAC has been 
the establishment of a small working group of engineers and engineering managers 
active in their fields that advise the program coordinators and help maintain a relevant 
focus for the Engineering programs at York College. This group is designated as 
ICAB and has, as its primary tasks, the responsibility to (i) provide input in carrying 
out the mission, goals, and objectives of the York College Engineering Program; 
(ii) provide input related to curriculum structure, course content, and classroom and 
laboratory needs for the purpose of maintaining program relevancy and focus; (iii) 
assist in determining appropriate outcomes (and their measures) required to achieve 
program objectives; (iv) help assess program outcomes from an industrial point of 
view and assist with the use of these assessments in the continuous improvement of 
the Program; (v) as needs arise, assume a proactive role in proposing new engineering 
programs— as well as alternatives to existing ones — for the purpose of both improving 
and expanding the base of engineering and engineering education in the York region. 

Engineering Facilities 

Engineering programs are facility intensive. Engineering students are continually 
involved in some aspect of hands-on laboratory and/or design project activity. Modern 
engineering laboratory equipment, computational facilities, and design-project work 
areas have been provided to meet individual course and laboratory needs. The goal 
is to provide our Engineering students with access to state-of-the-art equipment and 
machines. The laboratory areas include the following: Design Project. Computer/ CAD, 
Instrumentation. Embedded Systems, Signal Processing and Communication Systems, 
Power Systems, Automation & Robotics, Machine Tool and Materials Processing, 
Materials Science and Engineering, Solid Body Mechanics, and Thermodynamics/ 
Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Forensic Chemistry 

The Forensic Chemistry major is designed to prepare students as professionals through 
rig'orous scientific and forensic experiences necessary for a forensic laboratory career 
or related fields and/or to pursue graduate studies in chemistry, forensic science, or 
law. Program graduates will additionally acquire expertise in scientifically analyzing 
forensic evidence and in explaining its technical significance in a mock court of law. 



300 Programs of Study 



The Forensic Chemistry degree program follows the guidelines recommended by 
the Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC) and 
by the Technical Working Group for Education and Training in Forensic Sciences 
(TWGED). 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Forensic Chemistry must complete 
a minimum of 126 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0. satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

The required courses for the Forensic Chemistry major are: 

Common Core Requirements (17 credit hours) 

WRT102 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MAT171 Calculus I (4) (fulfills core mathematics requirement) 
Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements (24 credit hours) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6) 

Area IV: AmericanAVestern Civilization and Government (6) 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives ( 1 2 credit^) 

Major Requirements (73 credits, 2.0 required in each course) 

CHM 1 30 First Year Chemistry Colloquium 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I* 

CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II* OR 

CHM 1 46 Advanced Chemistry II 

CHM 150 Introductory Seminar in Computers for Chemists 

CHM 152 Introductory Seminar in Chemistry Issues. Ethics, 
and Experimental Design 

BIO 1 50 Biology I 

PHY 1 10 General Physics (Mechanics and Heat) OR 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 

PHY 11 2 General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) OR 

PHY 1 62 Engineering Physics (Heat, Thermodynamics, and Sound) 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 



Fulfill Area III Distribution Requirements. 



Department of Physical Sciences 301 



CHM236 Organic Chemistry II 

MAT 172 Calculus II 

MAT271 Calculus III 

MAT272 Differential Equations 

CHM336 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 

CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

CHM344 Physical Chemistry I 

CHM444 Inorganic Chemistry 

FCM200 Criminalistics 

FCM362 Crime Scene Processing 

FCM410 Forensic Body Fluid Analysis 

FCM45 1 Forensic Laboratory Experience 

FCM480 Forensic Independent Study OR 

FCM490 Forensic Internship 

Forensic Chemistry (suggested course sequence) 

Freshmen Year Credits 

First Year Chemistry Colloquium 1 

General Chemistry I 4 

Advanced Chemistry II 5 

Biology I 4 

Calculus I and II 8 

Computers for Cherrusts 1 

Analytical Reading & Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Academic Writing - . 3 

Information Literacy _2_ 

34 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Organic Chemistry I and II 8 

General Physics I and II 8 

Criminalistics ' 4 

Crime Scene Processing . 3 

Calculus III ' ' 4 

Differential Equations 4 

Chemistry Issues, Ethics _\^ 

32 

Junior Year Credits 

Physical Chemistry I 4 

Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 4 

Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 4 

Forensic Body Fluid Analysis 4 

Physical Education 2 

Area Distribution Requirements 12 

30 



302 Programs of Study 



Senior Year Credits 

Forensic Laboratory Experience 2 

Forensic Internship or Independent Study 3 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Free Elective 12 

Area Distribution Requirements 12 

32 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics 

The major in Mathematics is based on the program recommended by the Mathe- 
matical Association of America. It is designed to prepare students for either a career 
in mathematics or a mathematics-related field, or to continue their studies in graduate 
school. We encourage undergraduate research experiences and/or industry internships 
to help our students prepare for their postgraduate careers. 

1 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Mathematics must complete a 
minimum of 124 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, satisfy the 
College's residency requirements, and complete the General Education Requirements 
of the College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis. 

In addition, students majoring in Mathematics must maintain a 2.0 average in all 
major requirements. 

Thie required courses for the IVIathematics Major are: 

Common Core Requirements (17 credit hours) 

WRT 1 02 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM 104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
M ATI 71 Calculus I (4) 

Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements (24 credits) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (6) Jj 

Area IV: AmericanAVestern Civilization and Government (6) 

Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives (19 credits) 

Required Majors Courses (64 credits) 

CS200 Fundamentals of Programming and Algorithms I 



Department of Physical Sciences 303 



MAT 172, M AT27 1 Calculus II and III 

MAT230 Exploring Mathematics with the Computer 
MAT260 Elementary Linear Algebra 
MAT272 Differential Equations 
MAT280 Mathematical Structures 
MAT320 Number Theory 
M AT36 1 Abstract Algebra I 
MAT37 1 . MAT372 Advanced Calculus I & II 
MAT480 Point-Set Topology 
MAT493 Senior Seminar in Mathematics 
MAT495 History of Math 
PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 
PHY162 (Heat. Thermodynamics, and Sound). OR 
PHY260 (Electricity & Magnetism), OR 
PHY262 Engineering Physics (Optics and Modem Physics) 
fulfills Area III General Distribution requirements) 
Math Electives: 9 credits from MAT345. MAT350, 
MAT360, MAT362, MAT391 , MAT440. MAT470, 
MAT473, MAT477, MAT490, MAT496. 

A grade of 2.0 or better is required in all Mathematics courses. 

Mathematics (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Calculus I & II 8 

Area II Distribution Requirements 6 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education . • , 1 

Free Electives _^ 

32 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Calculus III 4 

Differential Equations 4 

Fundamentals of Programming and Algorithms 4 

Mathematical Structures 3 

Elementary Linear Algebra 3 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 3 

Physical Education _1 

31 



304 Programs of Study 



Junior Year 


Credits 


Advanced Calculus I & II 


6 


Exploring Math with the Computer 


3 


Number Theory 


3 


Abstract Algebra I OR Point-Set Topology 


3 


Mathematics Electives 


3 


Engineering Physics 


9 


Free Electives 


6 




33 


Senior Year 


Credits 


Point-Set Topology OR Abstract Algebra 


3 


History of Mathematics 


3 


Senior Seminar in Mathematics 


3 


Mathematics Electives 


6 


Area IV Distribution Requirements 


3 


Free Electives 


10 




28 



The student may choose to complete courses from one of the following career-oriented 
tracks: 

Actuarial Track 

ACC220 Financial Accounting 
ECO200 and 20 1 Macro and Micro Economics (ADR II) (VEE Credit**) 
FIN300 or MBA572 Managerial Finance 
FIN330 or MBA567 Risk Management and Insurance or 
Compensation and Benefits Systems 
MAT350 Probability and Statistics 

Computational Track with Minor in Computer Science 

CS20 1 Fundamentals of Programming and Algorithms II 

CS360 Analysis of Algorithms CS320, CS340, or CS370 

MAT391 Cryptology 

MAT470 Numerical Analysis 

Government Track 

12 credits of a Foreign Language of choice (six credits fulfill ADR V) 
INT 144 or INT 146 Intro to East Asia or Intro to Middle East 
MAT391 Cryptology 
MAT470 Numerical Analysis 
MAT490 Math Internship 
MAT496 Reading and Research 



Department of Physical Sciences 305 

Pure Math/Graduate School Track 

MAT362 Abstract Algebra II 

MAT470 Numerical Analysis 

MAT473 Partial Differential Equations 

MAT477 Complex Analysis 

MAT496 Reading and Research 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Secondary Education-General Science 

This program is designed to prepare students for a career teaching science in the 
middle school. Teaching certification is offered through the Department of Education 
(see page 166 for a complete description of certification requirements). 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-General 
Science must complete a minimum of 125 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.0 or higher, and complete the General Education Requirements of the 
College. Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be 
taken on a pass/fail basis, and credits earned in WRTIOO may not be applied to degree 
requirements. 

In addition, students majoring in Secondary Education-General Science must 
maintain a 3.0 grade point average in all major requirements. Students in Secondary 
Education should carefully review the information in the Department of Education 
section of this chapter for a complete description of certification and degree 
requirements. 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-General Science 

Common Core Requirements (16 credit hours) '■ 

WRT102 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM104 Human Communication (3) ' 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MATl 1 1 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving (3) 
Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements ( 1 8 credit hours) * ' 

' Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 

Area IV: American/Western Civilization and Government (6) 
Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives (12-14 credits) 

Discipline Certification Requirements (32-35 credits)^ 

CHM 1 34/CHM 1 35 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1 36/CHM 1 37 General Chemistry II 



306 Programs of Study 



PHYllO/PHYlll 

PHY112/PHY113 

PHY 160 

PHY162/PHY163 

ESS152/ESS153 

BIO150/BIO151 

G243 

IPS 105 

IFS275 

MAT230 

One of the following: 



General Physics I AND 

General Physics II OR 

Engineering Physics (Mechanics) AND 

Engineering Physics 

(Heat, Thermodynamics, and Sound) II 

Earth/Space Science 

Biology I 

Introduction to Geography 

Personal Productivity Computing OR 

Information System Technology OR 

Exploring Mathematics with the Computer 



MAT171 Calculus I 

MAT 172 Calculus II 

MAT250 Elements of Statistics 

MAT260 Elementary Linear Algebra 

MAT271 Calculus III 

Specialization Courses (six to 10 credits required from one of the following areas)- 



Biology 



BIO120/BIO121 
BI0124/BI0125 
BI0152/BI0153 
BIO210/BIO211 
BI0212/BI0213 

BI0216 
BIO220/BIO221 
BI0222/BI0223 

BI0232 
BIO240/BIO241 
BIO302/BIO303 
BIO304/BIO305 
BIO308/BIO309 
BIO330/BIO331 
BIO370/BIO371 



Chemistry 



CHM102/CHM103 
CHM234/CHM235 
CHM236/CHM237 
CHM336/CHM337 
CHM338/CHM339 
CHM344/CHM345 
CHM346/CHM347 
CHM350 



Field Natural History 

Introduction to Oceanography 

Biology III 

Marine Biology 

Environmental Biology 

Microbes: Unseen Life on Earth 

Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

Plant Taxonomy and Seasonal Flora 

Genetics' 

Zoology 

Botany 

Animal Physiology 

Biology of Microorganisms 

Evolutionary Biology 



Chemistry and Society 
Organic Chemistry I 
Organic Chemistry II 
Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 
Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 
Physical Chemistry I 
Physical Chemistry II 
Biochemistry 



Department of Physical Sciences 307 



Physics 



ME250 

ME252 

ME264 

PHY 160 

PHY162/PHY163 



Statics 
Dynamics 

Strength of Materials 
Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 
Engineering Physics 
(Heat, Thermodynamics, and Sound) 
PHY262 Engineering Physics IV 
(M ATI 71 and MAT 172 are required with the Physics option) 

Professional Preparation Courses- (39 credits) 

PSYIOO General Psychology 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed. 

ED200 Instructional Technology 

ED22 1 Introduction to American Education 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education' 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE351 Teaching Strategies 

SE354 Teaching General Science 

SE360 ReadingAVriting Across the Curriculum 

Student Teaching Semester-"* 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies OR 

SE4I6 Directed Prof . Educ . Exper."" 

SE4I2 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE413 Selected Topics 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

-Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higlier. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

-'SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

""Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

-^Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 



Secondary Education-General Science (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Mathematics 3-4 

Information Literacy 2 

Introduction to Sociology OR General Psychology 3 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Human Communication 3 

Physical Education 2 

31-32 



308 Programs of Study 



Sophomore Year Credits 

Introduction to Sociology OR General Psychology 3 

Introduction to American Education 3 

Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed. 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 6 

Area of Specialization 6-8 

Free Electives 12 

33-35 

Junior Year Credits 

Free Elective 2 

General Chemistry I & II 8 

Earth and Space Science 3 

Biology I 4 

Introduction to Geography 3 

IFS 105 or IFS275 or MAT230 3 

Instructional Technology 3 

Secondary School Experience 3 

Teaching Strategies _3 

32 

Senior Year Credits 

Teaching Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum SE360 1 
Teaching Gen. Science 3 

General Physics or Eng. Physics 8 

Free Electives 2 

Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 12 

Student Teaching SE404 OR 

Focused Studies SE405 

Practicum in Student Teaching SE412 

Selected Topics in Education SE413 

29 



*Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Secondary Education-Mathematics 

This program is designed to prepare students for a career in teaching mathematics in 
a middle school, junior high, or high school. Teaching certification is offered through 
the Department of Education (see page 193 for a complete description of certification 
requirements). 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Secondary Education-Mathematics 
must complete a minimum of 128 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average 
of 3.0 or higher, and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. 



Department of Physical Sciences 309 

Courses used to complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a 
pass/fail basis. 

In addition. Secondary Education-Mathematics majors must maintain a 3.0 grade 
point average in all major requirements. Students in Secondary Education should 
carefully review the infomiation in the Department of Education (see page 193 for a 
complete description of certification and degree requirements). 

Required Courses in Secondary Education-Matliematics: 

Common Core Requirements (17 credit hours) 

WRT102 Analytical Reading and Writing (3) 
WRT202 Academic Writing (3) 

CM 104 Human Communication (3) 

IFLlOl Information Literacy (2) 
MATI7I Calculus I (4) 

Physical Education (2) 

Area Distribution Requirements ( 1 8 credit hours) 

Area I: Fine Arts and Humanities (6) 
Area IV: AmericanAVestern Civilization and Government (6) 
Area V: International Studies/Foreign Language (6) 

Free Electives (12 credits) 

Discipline Certification Requirements (47-48 credits)- 

MAT172 Analytical Geometry and Calculus II 

M AT260 Elementary Linear Algebra 

MAT27 1 Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 

MAT272 Differential Equations 

MAT280 Mathematical Structures 

MAT345 Modem Geometry 

MAT350 Probability and Statistics 

MAT355 Math Standards'' 

MAT495 History of Mathematics 

Mathematics Electives (12 credits from one of the following: MAT210, 

MAT361 , MAT362, MAT371 , MAT372, MAT491 . MAT493) 

One of the following two-course science sequences: BIO150-152 OR CHM134-136 
OR PHY 160 AND either PHY 162, PHY260, OR PHY262. (fulfills Area III General 
Distribution Requirement) 

Professional Preparation Courses- (40 credits) 

PSYIOO General Psychology' 

SOCIOO Introduction to Sociology' 

ED371 Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed. 

ED200 Instructional Technology 



310 Programs of Study 



ED221 Introduction to American Education 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education-' 

SE350 Secondary School Experience 

SE35 1 Teaching Strategies 

SE355 Teaching Mathematics 

SE360 Teaching Reading and Writing 

Student Teaching Semester- "* 

SE404 Student Teaching OR 

SE405 Focused Studies OR 

SE416 Directed Prof . Educ . Exper.^ 

SE412 Practicum in Student Teaching 

SE41 3 Selected Topics in Education 



'Satisfies Area Distribution Requirements. 

-Grade earned must be a 2.0 or higher. This includes all courses in field of major study. 

-'SE402 Community and Legal Issues in Education must be scheduled the term immediately prior to the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

■"Students are required to have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 before admittance into the Student 

Teaching Semester. 

-■"Taken as an option to SE404 by students seeking the degree without certification. 

*'Must be taken concurrently with SE355. 

Secondary Education-Mathematics (suggested course sequence) 

Freshman Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Calculus I and II 8 

Information Literacy 2 

Human Communication 3 

General Psychology 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

Area I Distribution Requirements 3 

Physical Education 1 

Introduction to American Education 3 

Free Elective 3 

35 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Instructional Technology 3 

Psychology of Teaching/Sec. Ed. 3 

Calculus III 4 

Differential Equations 4 

Math Elective 3 

Elementary Linear Algebra 3 
BIO 150- 152 OR CHM134-136 OR PHY 160 

AND either PHY162,PHY260,PHY262 8 



Department of Physical Sciences 311 



Physical Education 1 

Teaching Reading and Writing 1 

Free Elective _3 

33 

Junior Year Credits 

Statistics 3 

Mathematical Structures 3 

Modern Geometry 3 

Secondary School Experience 3 

Secondary Teaching Strategies 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirements 6 

Area V Distribution Requirements 6 

Area I Distribution Requirements 3 

Mathematics Elective _3_ 

33 

Senior Year Credits 
Teaching Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum SE360 1 

Community and Legal Issues in Education* 3 

Teaching Mathematics 3 

Math Standards 1 

History of Mathematics 3 

Mathematics Elective 6 

Student Teaching Semester (A 3.0 GPA or higher required) 12 

Student Teaching SE404 OR 
Focused Studies SE405 
Practicum in Student Teaching SE4 12 

Selected Topics in Education SE4 13 

27 



*Community and Legal Issues in Education must be taken the semester prior to the Student Teaching Semester. 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 
Associate of Science Degree in Chemistry 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students must complete a minimum of 68 credits. 
Students must earn a grade of 2.0 (C) or higher in all courses required in the major. In 
addition, students must maintain a 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA, satisfy the residence 
requirements of the College, and complete General Education Requirements. 

The courses required for the AS Degree in Chemistry are: 

CHM 1 34 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1 36 General Chemistry II 



312 Programs of Study 



PHY 1 10 General Physics (Mechanics and Heat) OR 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 

PHYl 12 General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) OR 

PHY 162 Engineering Physics (Heat, Thermodynamics, and Sound) 

CHM234 Organic Chemistry I 

CHM236 Organic Chemistry II 

CHM336 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry OR 

CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

6-8 credits of Mathematics (MAT102 and MAT105 are not acceptable.) 

Chemistry (suggested course sequence) 



Freshman Year 


Credits 


Analytical Reading and Writing 


3 


Academic Writing 


3 


General Chemistry 


8 


General Physics 


8 


Critical Thinking/Problem Solving in Math OR Calculus I 


3-4 


Area I Distribution Requirement 


3 


Information Literacy 


2 


Free Electives 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




34-35 


Sophomore Year 


Credits 


Mathematics 


3 


Organic Chemistry 


8 


Analytical Chemistry (Instrumental OR Quantitative) 


4 


Area II Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area V Distribution Requirement 


3 


Area IV Distribution Requirement 


3 


Human Communication 


3 


Mathematics 


3 


Free Electives 


3 


Physical Education 


1 




34 



Associate of Science Degree in Physics 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students majoring in Physics must complete a minimum 
of 68 credits, achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, achieve a 2.0 or higher 
average in their science and math courses, satisfy the College's residency requirements, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 



Department of Physical Sciences 313 



Required courses are: 

M ATI 71 Calculus I 

MAT 172 Calculus II 

MAT271 Calculus III 

MAT272 Differential Equations OR 

MAT260 Linear Algebra 

PHY 160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics 

PHY 162 Engineering Physics (Heat. Thermodynamics, Sound) 

PHY260 Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

PHY262 Engineering Physics (Optics and Modem Physics) 

ME250 Statics 

ME252 Dynamics 

Physics (suggested course sequence) 

Freshmen Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Calculus I and II 8 
Engineering Physics 

(Mechanics; Heat, Thermodynamics and Sound) 9 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Physical Education _\^ 

35 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Calculus III 4 

Linear Algebra OR Differential Equations 3-4 
Engineering Physics (Electricity and 

Magnetism; Optics and Modem Physics) 8 

Statics 3 

Dynamics 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement 3 

Free Electives 6 

Physical Education 1_ 

34-35 

DEPARTMENTAL MINORS 
Minor in Chemistry 

The minor in Chemistry provides a foundation in general chemical principles, organic 



314 Programs of Study 



chemistry, and analytical chemistry. The Chemistry Minor complements many majors, 
enhancing career opportunities in education, business, and industry. 

Requirements of the Chemistry Minor: 

CHMl 34/ 1 36 General Chemistry I & II 
CHM234/236 Organic Chemistry I & II 

One course from: 

CHM336 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry OR 
CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

Minor in Computer Science 

The Computer Science Minor is designed to augment the skills of students majoring 
in chemistry, mathematics, as well as those students outside of the Physical Sciences 
Department with inclination and strength in this area. Students can greatly broaden 
their post-graduate horizons through this minor, by adding computing facility to the 
proficiencies gained through their major program. 

Requirements of the Computer Science Minor: 

CS 1 1 Fundamentals of Computer Science I AND 

CS201 Fundamentals of Computer Science II 
OR 

IFS200 Introduction to Programming and Software Engineering I AND 

IFS201 Introduction to Programming and Software Engineering II 

MAT171 Calculus I OR 

MAT 1 20 Applied Calculus 

One of the following courses: 

CS320 Software Engineering and Design 

CS340 Programming Language Design 

CS350 Data Structures 

CS360 Analysis of Algorithms 

CS420 Operating Systems 

One of the following courses (must be different than the course selected from the 
above category): 

CS320 Software Engineering and Design 

CS340 Programming Language Design 

CS350 Data Structures 

CS360 Analysis of Algorithms 

CS370 Computer Graphics Programming I 

CS420 Operating Systems 

CS495-497 Special Topics in Computer Science 

CS498 Independent Study 



Department of Physical Sciences 315 



MAT391 
CS/MAT470 



Cryptology 
Numerical Analysis 



Minor in Mathematics 

Required courses for the Mathematics IVIinor: 

MAT171/MAT172 Calculus I and II 

Differential Equations 



MAT272 
MAT235 
MAT280 



Discrete Mathematics OR 
Mathematical Structures 



One course selected from the followins: 



MAT260 

MAT271 

MAT345 

MAT350 

MAT361/MAT362 

MAT371/MAT372 
MAT470 

Minor in Physics 



Elementary Linear Algebra 
Calculus III 
Modern Geometry 
Probability and Statistics 
Abstract Algebra I OR II 
Advanced Calculus I OR II 
Numerical Analysis 



The minor in Physics gives students the opportunity to explore and understand the 
physical laws which play an important role in nature and everyday life. Thus, the 
students will be able to appreciate these laws and apply them to their advantage in 
day-to-day activities. 

Requirements for the Physics IVIinor: 

PHY160 Engineering Physics (Mechanics) 

PHY 162 Engineering Physics (Heat, Thermodynamics and Sound) 

PHY260 Engineering Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

PHY262 Engineering Physics (Optics and Modem Physics) 

ME250 Statics OR 

ME252 Dynamics and Vibration 




INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE WITH A SELF-DESIGNED MAJOR 

The Self-Designed Major allows York College students to construct an 
individualized program of study using existing courses offered by one or more 
academic departments. A student interested in pursuing such an option must have 
a 3.0 or higher grade point average, and two faculty members representing the 
disciplines included in the proposed major must agree to serve as self-designed 
major advisors. Finally, students must prepare a proposal for their plan of study 
that defines the title of their intended major, lists the courses which he or she plans 
to include in their program, and provides a rationale for the development of their 
self-designed major. 

Since the early planning stages of the Self-Designed Major are especially important 
for both the student and advisor, students should be encouraged to construct a plan as 
early in their academic careers as possible. The proposal for the Self-Designed Major 
must be approved by both advisors. Then, at any time prior to the completion of 59 
credits, the student must submit the proposal to the Academic Programs Committee 
for review and action. Changes in approved Self-Designed Major programs must 
be endorsed by both advisors and approved by the Academic Programs Committee. 
Under normal circumstances, courses used to construct a self-designed major may not 
be simultaneously used to complete other college majors or minors. 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students must complete a minimum of 124 credits, 
complete the General Education Requirements of the College, satisfy the College's 
residency requirement, and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. 

Required Courses for the Self-Designed Major: m 

The required courses for each student's self-designed major must be approved by the 
Academic Programs Committee following endorsement by the student's advisors. 
A minimum of 39 credits within the major selected from at least two academic 
disciplines must be included. This coursework must include a minimum of 18 credits 
at the 300 level or above, and at least 15 credits of coursework must be completed in 
each discipline represented in the major. No more than six credits of independent study 
or internship may be completed as part of the requirements for the major. 

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN GENERAL STUDIES \ 

Requirements for Graduation: 

To be eligible for graduation, students pursuing an associate of science degree 
in General Studies must complete a minimum of 62 credits, achieve a cumulative 
grade point average of 2.0 or higher, satisfy the College's residency requirements, 
and complete the General Education Requirements of the College. Courses used to 
complete General Education Requirements may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 



316 



Interdisciplinary Programs 317 



General Studies (suggested course sequence) 

Freshmen Year Credits 

Analytical Reading and Writing 3 

Academic Writing 3 

Human Communication 3 

Information Literacy 2 

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving 3 

Physical Education 1 

Area I Distribution Requirement 3 

Area II Distribution Requirement 3 

Area III Distribution Requirement 3 

Area IV Distribution Requirement 3 

Area V Distribution Requirement _3 

30 

Sophomore Year Credits 

Physical Education 1 

Elective Courses 31 

32 

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES MINOR 

The Women's and Gender Studies Minor introduces students to the concept of gender 
as an organizing principle of cultural experience. Through interdisciplinary study, 
students will understand gender as a key factor that drives both continuity and change 
in our culture. Courses in this minor explore the implications of gender and gender 
roles in both Western and non-Western societies. 

Study of the ways in which gender shapes human consciousness and 
determines the social, political, and cultural organization of society will stimulate 
both students' intellectual growth and their personal awareness of how gender 
affects their world. 

For career-oriented students, this minor will enhance their sensitivity to those 
issues of gender (such as sex discrimination, sexual harassment, equal pay for 
comparable worth, family leave) that have become increasingly prevalent in today's 
work world. 

The Women's and Gender Studies Minor is housed in the English and Humanities 
Department at York College. 

Requirements for the Women's and Gender Studies Minor: 

For this minor, students are required to take the foundation course. Introduction to 
Women's and Gender Studies, and five additional electives. Internship or independent 
study is strongly recommended, to be carried out according to College guidelines. 
Special topics courses offered by departments also often qualify for Women's and 
Gender Studies credit. 



318 Programs of Study 



Courses for qualifying for Women's and Gender Studies Minor credit: 



WGS200 

WGS210 

SOC225/WGS225 

PHL238AVGS238 

CJA303AVGS303 

H340/WGS340 

H342/WGS342 

LIT344/WGS344 

SOC360/WGS360 

PHL380AVGS380 

REL381AVGS381 

LIT382AVGS382 

WGS450/WGS451 

WGS498AVGS499 



Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies 

Women's Health 

Tiie Family 

Race, Gender, and Sexuality 

Gender and Crime 

Women and War 

Women in the United States: A History 

Love and Sex in Literature 

Gender and Society 

Feminist Thought 

Women and Religion 

Women in Literature 

Women's and Gender Studies Internship 

Independent Study 






COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ACCOUNTING (ACC) 320 

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT) 322 

ART (ART) 323 

BEHAVIORAL 
SCIENCES (BEH) 333 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (BIO) 334 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
COURSES (BUS) 340 

CHEMISTRY (CHM) 341 

CLINICAL LABORATORY 
SCIENCE (CLS) 344 

COMMUNICATION (CM) 345 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CS) 350 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJA) 353 

EARTH/SPACE SCIENCE (ESS) 356 

ECONOMICS (ECO) 357 

EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY, 
SECONDARY, SPECIAL) 
(ED, EE, SE, SPE) 358 

ENGINEERING (ELECTRICAL AND 
COMPUTER, MECHANICAL) 
(EGR, ECE, ME) 367 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP 
(ENT, IBS) 376 

FILM (FLM) 379 

FINANCE (FIN, IBS) 380 

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 
(FCM) 381 

GEOGRAPHY (G) 382 

GERONTOLOGY (GER) 383 

HEALTHCARE CODING 
(HCC) 385 

HISTORY (H) 386 

HUMANITIES (HUM) 393 

INFORMATION LITERACY 
(IFL) 394 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
(IFS) 394 

INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS (IBS) 398 



INTERNATIONAL 
STUDIES (INT) 398 

LANGUAGES (ARB, 
INT, FRN, GRM, ITL, 
LAT, POR, RUS, SPN) 399 

LITERATURE (LIT) 406 

LONG-TERM CARE 
ADMINISTRATION (LTC) 410 

MANAGEMENT (MGT) 411 

MARKETING (MKT, IBS) 413 

MATHEMATICS (MAT) 416 

MUSIC (MUS) 421 

NUCLEAR MEDICINE 
TECHNOLOGY (NM) 429 

NURSING (NUR) 430 

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 
AND DEVELOPMENT (OBD) 433 

PHILOSOPHY (PHL) 434 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) 437 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (PSC) 441 

PHYSICS (PHY) 442 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS) 443 

PREMEDICAL 
STUDIES (PMD) 447 

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) 448 

OUANTITATIVE 
BUSINESS (QBA) 452 

RECREATION AND LEISURE 
ADMINISTRATION (REC) 453 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RED 456 

RESPIRATORY CARE (RT) 457 

SOCIOLOGY (SOC) 459 

SPORT MANAGEMENT 
(SPM) 462 

THEATRE (THE) 465 

WOMEN'S AND GENDER 
STUDIES (WGS) 468 

WRITING (WRT) 470 



319 




Course Descriptions 



ACCOUNTING 



ACC220 Financial Accounting 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, 
and practices of accounting. Subjects covered in- 
clude preparing, analyzing, and using financial 
statements, accounting for partnerships and corpo- 
rations, accounting for long-term assets and long- 
term debt. 

3 credit hours. 

ACC225 IVIanagerial Accounting 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Basic managerial accounting principles and concepts 
are studied. Subjects covered include accounting 
techniques such as planning, control and motivating 
tools; using accounting data for decision making and 
performance evaluation. Prerequisite: Completion 
of ACC220 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC305 Taxation I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

An introduction to federal income taxation of in- 
dividuals. Topics include inclusions and exclusions 
from gross income, capital gains and losses, busi- 
ness deductions, itemized deduction, depreciation 
and cost recovery, and nontaxable property trans- 
actions. Both tax planning and tax preparation are 
stressed. Prerequisite: Completion of ACC220 with 
a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC315 Introduction to Financial Fraud 
Fall Semester 

This course introduces the student to the various types 
of fraud encountered in business and the means to 
prevent, detect, and investigate fraud. Students will 
learn the many ways in which fraud is manifested 
on financial statements and in business transactions, 
including consumer fraud and fraud against organi- 
zations. Prerequisites: Completion of ACC220 and 



ACC225 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC320 Intermediate Accounting I 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Study of the development of accounting principles 
and professional practice, statement of income and 
retained earnings, balance sheet, applications of 
present and future values, cash and short-term in- 
vestments, receivables, inventories, current liabili- 
ties, and contingencies. Prerequisites: Completion 
of ACC220 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC325 Intermediate Accounting II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Topics included: Acquisition and disposal of plant 
assets, depreciation and depletion, intangible assets, 
long-term investments, long-term debt, stockholders 
equity, stock rights, warrants, options, convertible 
securities, treasury stock, earnings per share. Pre- 
requisite: Completion of ACC320 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. M 

3 credit hours. ™ 

ACC330 Intermediate Accounting III 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Topics included: pension plans, leases, income 
taxes, accounting changes, statement of changes in 
financial position, analysis of financial statements, 
accounting for inflation, full disclosure in financial 
reporting, review of the latest FASB Statements and 
Interpretations. Prerequisite: Completion of ACC325 
with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC375 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

A further study of managerial accounting and its use 
as a tool of management. The course stresses the 
analysis and presentation of accounting data for use 
by management in decision making and planning. 
Subject area includes cost allocation, inventory plan- 



Accounting 321 



ning and control, joint-product costing, by-product 
costs, cost behavior patterns, and sales and produc- 
tion mix. Prerequisite: Completion of ACC225 with 
a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC395 Taxation 11 

A study of the Internal Revenue Code. IRS reg- 
ulations, and U.S. court decisions as they relate to 
corporations, partnerships, trusts, gifts, and estates. 
Tax planning and the effect of the tax law on busi- 
ness decisions is emphasized. Research will be re- 
quired to demonstrate student's ability to research 
current tax issues and present same in a written re- 
port. Prerequisite: Completion of ACC305 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC410 Auditing 

Spring Semester 

A study of audit principles and current procedures, 
including special techniques in the prevention and 
detection of fraud, preparation of audit reports and 
working papers, and internal audit methods. This is 
a writing/communication-intensive course. Prereq- 
uisite: Completion of ACC325 with a grade of 2.0 
or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

IBS415 International Accounting (formerly 
ACC415) 

Study of the diversity that exists in accounting re- 
porting and disclosure practices in different coun- 
tries, the reasons for accounting diversity, and the 
problems/challenges created by accounting diversity 
for multinational enterprises, international investors, 
and regulators. Special emphasis is given to the 
comparison between U.S. standards (U.S. GAAP) 
and other countries' standards in measurement, re- 
porting, and disclosing economic events. Prerequi- 
site: Completion of ACC325 with a grade of 2.0 or 
higher. 

3 credit hours. 

ACC420 Advanced Accounting 

Spring Semester 

A continuing in-depth study of accounting principles 
and current concepts in which theory and practice 
are reconciled. Subjects include business combina- 
tions and consolidations. Prerequisite: Completion 



of ACC325 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ACC425 Special Topics in Accounting 

A continuing in-depth study of accounting principles 
and current concepts. Subjects included are special 
problems, governmental units, non-profit organiza- 
tions, multinational enterprises, and fiduciaries. Pre- 
requisite: Completion of ACC325 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

ACC490, ACC491 Accounting Internship 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Planned and supervised work experience at selected 
cooperating firms. Internships require students to 
meet periodically with a faculty supervisor, provide 
a written deliverable, and participate in an end-of- 
intemship evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior standing 
and departmental approval of each student partici- 
pant's individual program. The program requires ap- 
proximately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. Grad- 
ing will be pass/fail. 

3 credit hours each semester. 

ACC492, ACC493 Accounting Internship 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Planned and supervised work experience at selected 
cooperating firms. Internships require students to 
meet periodically with a faculty supervisor, provide 
a written deliverable, and participate in an end-of- 
intemship evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior standing 
and departmental approval of each student partici- 
pant's individual program. The program requires 
approximately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. 
Students admitted to the Dual Degree Program must 
also schedule MBA506 with ACC492 and^MBASO? 
with ACC493 to fulfill the work experience require- 
ment. Grading will be pass/fail. 
3 credit hours each semester. 



322 Course Descriptions 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



ANT210 Introduction to Physical 
Anthropology 

Fall Semester 

This course surveys the principles and findings of 
the field of human paleontology, physical anthro- 
pology, and archaeological methods. It includes the 
study of evolution, fossil forms, and primates. 
3 credit hours. 

ANT220 Cultural Anthropology 

Fall-Spring Semester 

This course focuses on culture and human behaviors 
in the context of culture. It examines major cultural 
systems, including language, religious, economic, 
political, and kinship systems. Emphasis is placed 
on the student's ability to understand and apply basic 
anthropological concepts and theories. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

ANT230 Archaeology 
Fall Semester 

In this course, students will use a variety of ap- 
proaches to learn about archaeology. The course 
provides information about theories, methods, and 
practice of this field of study. Through lecture, com- 
puter simulation, and visits to archaeology sites/mu- 
seums, students will be able to explore some of the 
major areas of archaeological research. 5 
3 credit hours. 

ANT300 Food and Culture 

Spring Semester 

This advanced anthropology course is a two-part 
study of food and culture. Part one concentrates on 
an anthropological investigation of food and its re- 
lationship to culture. The theoretical approach used 
in this section is based on systems analysis, looking 
at each major cultural system, and how food relates 
to them. Part two will be student-led review of four 
to five cultural cuisines. The goals for this part of 
the course will be for students to investigate dif- 
ferent cultures and their foods while applying the 
theoretical perspectives and analysis techniques pre- 
viously learned. Prerequisite: ANT220 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 



ANT310 Advanced Physical Anthropology: 
Human Paleontology 

Spring Semester 

A study of procedures and techniques used by physi- 
cal anthropologists and archaeologists in excavating, 
analyzing, and interpreting human skeletal remains. 
Emphasis will be placed on student work with hu- 
man skeletal remains in a laboratory setting. Prereq- 
uisite: ANT2 10. 
3 credit hours. 

ANT325 Culture and Personality 

Fall semester, odd-numbered years 

Culture and Personality studies how culture affects 
the individual's personality. Theoretically oriented, 
this course reviews cross-cultural practices of child 
rearing, roles, deviance, and mental health issues. 
Prerequisite: ANT220 or SOCIOO or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

ANT330 Anthropology of Religion 

Fall Semester 

Cultural anthropology is one of the four major sub- 
disciplines that examine the non-biological behaviors 
that allow humans to adapt to their living conditions. 
Religion is among those cultural universals that per- 
meates all aspects of humanity and is an extremely 
powerful force directing human behavior. Allowing 
for considerable variability within the confines of "re- 
ligion," this course is an intellectual adventure into 
exploring the relationship between being human and 
participation in religious experience. Students are 
required to become active participants in the learn- 
ing process and as a scholar, are obliged to share and 
communicate their ideas to classmates and colleagues. 
Prerequisite: ANT220 or permission of instructor. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

ANT350 Anthropology of Aging 
Fall semester, odd-numbered years 

This course provides a cross-cultural perspective on 
aging experiences. It explores attitudes toward and 
treatment of older people in many different culture. 
Patterns of cultural behaviors are studied which may 
increase life satisfaction for the elderly. 
3 credit hours. 



Art 323 



ANT390, ANT391 Selected Topics in Cultural 
Anthropology 

The central emphasis in this course will be on the 
topics of environment, material culture, world view, 
and religion. In addition to these regularly presented 
topics, cultural anthropology subjects of interest to 
both the professor and students will be discussed 
in seminar presentations. Prerequisite: ANT210 or 
ANT220 or permission of instructor. 
3 credit hours, 

ANT392 Anthropology and Medicine 
Spring Semester 

This course will explore the nature of medical an- 
thropology, its historical background and current 
theoretical perspectives. The course is designed to 
develop an awareness of the biological, cultural, 
linguistic, and historical variability within human- 
kind related to health and disease. Topics include 



ethnomedicine, epidemiology, nutrition, growth and 
development, health care providers, health policies, 
and the language and speech of illness and wellness. 
Prerequisites: ANT210 or ANT220. 
3 credit hours. 

ANT498, ANT499 Independent Study 

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu- 
nity for the student who wishes to undertake a well- 
defined research project. While the student conducts 
his work under the guidance of a faculty member 
of his own choosing, the project is carried out in 
an independent manner without regular class meet- 
ings. Effective independent study is characterized 
by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase 
in the individual student's responsibility and initia- 
tive in the learning process. Prerequisite: ANT210 
orANT220. 

1-3 credit hours each semester. 



ART 



ART101 Introduction to Art Appreciation 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

Designed for non-Art majors, this course is an in- 
troduction to the visual arts and explores the nature 
of art and the mechanisms of creativity, the materi- 
als and methods of making art, the purpose of art in 
various cultures both ancient and contemporary, and 
the significance of visual literacy in today's world. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART110 Concepts of Design 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course introduces the non-Art major to the basic 
concepts of design, and includes an overview of studio 
practices and methods. Topics include the elements 
and principles of design, basics of typography, as well 
as exploring techniques for sketching and visualizing 
concepts. The course also presents basic strategies for 
effective visual communication across varied media. 
Classes consist of lectures, demonstrations, studio 
work, and individual and group critiques. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods, 

ART1 12 Concepts of Figure Drawing 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course introduces the non-Art major to life 



drawing, focusing on the human figure and the devel- 
opment of the students' technical and observational 
skills. Students are taught the fundamentals of hu- 
man structural form and anatomy, basic design and 
composition principles, and the use of various tools, 
materials, and methods used to draw the human 
figure. The significance of figural representation as 
cultural expression is also discussed. Classes consist 
of lectures, demonstrations, studio work, and indi- 
vidual and group critiques. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART114 Concepts of Painting 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course introduces the non-Art major to the ba- 
sic concepts of painting and includes an overview of 
studio practices and methods. Topics include an in- 
troduction to the methods, materials, and techniques 
for painting. This course requires that students con- 
sider their own artistic techniques within the histori- 
cal context of painting. Classes consist of lectures, 
demonstrations, studio work, and individual and 
group critiques. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 



324 Course Descriptions 



ART1 1 6 Concepts of Sculpture 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course offers an introductory studio experi- 
ence in sculpture for non-Art majors, providing the 
student with a basic understanding of the methods, 
materials, and techniques for working in three-di- 
mensional media. The student will also consider his 
or her own artistic styles and historical movements. 
Classes consist of lectures, demonstrations, studio 
work, and individual and group critiques. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART134 Concepts of Computer Graphics 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

Concepts of Computer Graphics is an introduc- 
tory-level course that familiarizes the non-Fine 
Arts or non-Graphic Design major with tech- 
niques, software, and equipment used to create, 
process, and display computer-generated graphics 
and images. The course also presents basic strat- 
egies for effective visual communication using 
digital methods. 

3 credit iiours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART137 Computer Graphics I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introduction to file management 
and organization as well as the fundamentals of im- 
age editing, vector-based drawing, and page layout. 
Through hands-on work, students learn the anatomy 
of the vector-based and the bitmapped image, the 
PostScript page description language, and under- 
standing of hardware configuration. Knowledge of 
the mechanics of the digital image will provide the 
foundation for all further study in digital design. In- 
terrelation and appropriate use of applications is em- 
phasized. Theories of digital process and case his- 
tories of various uses of digital media are included. 
Graphic Design majors only. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART200 Introduction to Graphic Design 

Fall Semester 

This course provides a foundation in the terminol- 
ogy, concepts, elements, and practice of Graphic De- 
sign. Students will learn basic formal, typographic 
and technical terminology, as well as gain aware- 



ness of Graphic Design's role in culture and history. 
Through hands-on studio projects, personal process 
and conceptual thinking will be emphasized. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART204 Survey of Western Art I 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides a survey of major develop- 
ments in the world's art from prehistoric past to 
1400. Emphasis is placed on studying the relation- 
ships between social, political, and cultural forces 
and the creation of art. Topics discussed include the 
origins of art. Egyptian art, the classical past, and 
Medieval art up to the early Renaissance period. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART205 Survey of Western Art II 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides a survey of the major devel- 
opments in the world's art from around 1400 to the 
present. Emphasis is placed on studying the relation- 
ships between social, political, economic, and cul- 
tural forces and the creation of art. Topics discussed 
include the Renaissance and Baroque periods, the 
emergence of modern art. design, photography, 
women artists, and contemporary trends in the vi- 
sual arts. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART210 Design I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introduction to the techniques, 
materials, and principles of two-dimensional visual 
organization. Through a series of projects involving 
the visual elements of line, shape, value, and texture, 
students investigate the concepts of two-dimension- 
al design and develop creative and problem-solving 
skills. Prerequisite: Art majors only. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART211 Design II 

Spring Semester 

Using design materials and techniques, students 
investigate the concepts and principles of three- 
dimensional organization, color theory, and the 
building of form in real space. Students develop 
an understanding of the language of and ideas in- 
herent in visual organization. Discussion, reviews. 



Art 325 



and written critiques are a part of this course. Pre- 
requisite: ART2 10. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART215 Drawing I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

By engaging the student in observational studies. 
Drawing I focuses on the study of structure, com- 
position, perspective, and toning and shading using 
various drawing media. Developing basic technical 
knowledge of the media, tools, and concepts of draw- 
ing is the emphasis of this course. Demonstration, 
museum and gallery visits, and slide lectures are a 
part of this course. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I, 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART 216 Figure Drawing I 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This beginner 's-level course is an introduction to de- 
veloping observational skills necessary for rendering 
the human form. By drawing from the nude model, 
the human structural form, its individual features 
relating to the whole, the relationship of the figure 
to its surrounding environment, and the human form 
as concept is addressed and explored. Discussion of 
figurative works from the Renaissance through Post- 
modern Art is presented through slide lecture and 
museum study. Prerequisite: Art majors only. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART218 Typography! 

Spring Semester 

This course teaches the terms and concepts needed 
to use type intelligently and effectively. Typographic 
anatomy, classification and measurement, as well as 
historical and technical aspects of letterforms will be 
covered. Students will learn the rules of typographic 
usage, based on visual perception and will develop 
awareness of the history of typography and its ef- 
fect on contemporary communication. Prerequisites: 
ART200,ART215. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART219 Typography II 
Spring Semester 

Building upon the basics learned in Typography I, 



this studio course challenges students to examine 
more complex typographic issues and develop ex- 
pressive ways to solve communication problems. 
Discussion of assigned readings about contem- 
porary typographic issues will help the student 
to understand type's role in design. With an em- 
phasis on composition, typographic hierarchy and 
syntax, and organization of information, the stu- 
dent will further develop the sensitivity needed to 
communicate effectively with type. Prerequisite: 
ART218. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART220 Painting I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

An introduction to the technical and aesthetic as- 
pects of painting, this course explores the medi- 
ums of oil and acrylic and the expressive qualities 
of paint. Emphasis is placed on the development of 
fundamental skills including the study of light, val- 
ue, and composition, methods of paint application 
and color mixing, and preparation of the painting 
surface. Museum, gallery, and artist studio visits are 
scheduled, as well as slide lectures. Prerequisite: Art 
majors only. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART223 Illustration I 
Fall Semester 

This course is an introduction to the materials, 
specialties, history, and methods of Illustration. 
Media including gouache, pencil, watercolor, pen 
and ink, and marker are examined through hands- 
on projects and demonstrations. A survey of il- 
lustration history is included, which familiarizes 
students with notable names and styles in illus- 
tration. The course emphasizes the importance of 
critical thinking, concept development, and cre- 
ative problem-solving. Prerequisites: ART215, 
ART216,ART220. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART225 Ceramics I 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

This is a beginner "s-level studio course that intro- 
duces the student to the techniques of ceramics. The 
student explores basic hand-building techniques and 



326 Course Descriptions 



gains an understanding of glazing and firing. Class 
includes an introduction to the potter's wheel. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART230 Sculpture I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Students are introduced to the various processes, 
tools, and materials used in sculpture such as clay, 
plaster, and assemblage and explore the relationship 
of ideas to materials and techniques in a three-di- 
mensional format. Prerequisite; Art majors only. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART244 Digital Art 

Spring Semester 

The computer is a widely accepted tool for artistic 
expression, and most museums and galleries devote 
space exclusively to the exhibition of digital art. 
This course is aimed at the artist interested in ex- 
ploring digitally generated art in the form of digital 
painting and drawing, photographic manipulation 
and collage, and mixed media applications. Pre- 
requisites: ART 134 and ART210, or ART 135 and 
ART 137. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART245 Photography I 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

This course provides an introduction to the art, aes- 
thetics, theory, and practice of black and white pho- 
tography. Emphasis will be on the technical skills 
and aesthetic decisions practiced in the darkroom to 
produce exhibition quality prints. The student will 
be expected to supply his/her own camera (35 mm 
SLR with manual control), paper, and film. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART246 Digital Photography 
Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

This course introduces the student to a variety of 
paths for creating a digitized image, managing and 
archiving graphic files, and learning the terminology 
relating to the digital photograph. Through assigned 
projects, the student will also learn the role of the 
digitized image in the visual arts, commercial print- 
ing, and publishing. 



3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART265 Drawing II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The student continues to develop skills introduced 
in Drawing I and begins to explore specific media 
as a means of communicating a concept. Experi- 
mentation with mixed media and collage expands 
the language capability of the student artist. Dem- 
onstration, museum and gallery visits, and slide 
lectures supplement individual and group critiques. 
Prerequisite: ART215. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART266 Figure Drawing II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

An ongoing study in the representation of the human 
form as addressed in Figure Drawing I. The further 
refinement of skills and development toward a more 
individual direction in the genre of figure drawing 
is the focus of this course. The choice of appropri- 
ate media, working in larger-scaled formats, solving 
technical and aesthetic problems, and generating a 
cohesive body of work are also considered in this 
course. Prerequisite: ART216. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio period 

ART270 Painting II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course builds upon the technical and concep- 
tual skills learned in Painting I, and the student be- 
gins to develop an individual direction in painting. 
The student is introduced to the portrait and figure 
as well as other subjects both representational and 
non-representational, and the formal study of color 
is continued. Slide presentations, painting demon- 
strations, individual and group critiques help guide 
the student. Museum, gallery, and artist studio visits 
enhance the course. Prerequisite: ART220. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART273 Illustration II 

Spring Semester 

This course builds on the principles and skills 
learned in Illustration I, with an emphasis on the de- 
velopment of a personal style and process. The role 



Art 327 



of typography, layout, and production in illustration 
is explored, as an important part of creative prob- 
lem-solving. Professional practices associated with 
illustration, including estimating cost, proposal writ- 
ing, presentation, and legal issues are covered. Pre- 
requisite: ART223. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART275 Ceramics II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This is an intemiediate-level studio course that ex- 
plores in-depth the various techniques of ceramics. 
The student further develops hand-building and 
wheel-throwing skills. The class explores surface 
and textural applications as well as glazing and color 
techniques. Assigned and individual projects, dem- 
onstrations, slide and video presentations, as well 
as critiques are a part of this course. Prerequisite: 
ART225. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART280 Sculpture II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The student continues to develop skills introduced 
in Sculpture I and begins to explore sculptural tech- 
niques and materials as a means of communicating 
a concept. Large-scale sculpture, installations, and 
environmental sculpture are also explored. Assigned 
and individual projects are a part of this course. Pre- 
requisite: ART230. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART284 Jewelry and Small Sculpture I 

Fall Semester 

This course offers an introduction to the design and 
execution of jewelry and small sculpture. Students 
will be introduced to techniques in precious metal 
construction, enameling, and lapidary arts. Styles 
and techniques for coursework will be derived from 
a wide variety of world cultures and historic peri- 
ods. Small sculpture will be explored through the 
lost wax method and executed in brass, bronze, and 
other semi-precious metals. Classes consist of lec- 
tures, demonstrations, studio work, and individual 
and group critiques. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 



ART287 Printmaking I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introductory investigation of tra- 
ditional and non-traditional relief and planographic 
methods of multiple imagery. The student will ex- 
plore the techniques of linocut, woodcut, monoprint- 
ing, and collography, as well as paper lithography 
and other experimental methods. This course not 
only provides a technical foundation in printmaking 
media but encourages innovative use of printmaking 
processes. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART290 Computer Graphics II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Building on the basics learned in Computer Graphics 
I, this course exposes the student to more advanced 
techniques and concepts of vector-based drawing, 
image editing, and page layout. Investigation into 
color spaces, layering, picture file formats, and inter- 
action of softwares takes place. The course includes 
an introduction to principles of non-print screen- 
based design as applied to CD-ROMs, web pages, 
and slide presentations. Prerequisite: ART 137. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART291 Printmaking II 

Fall-Spring Semester 

This course builds upon the technical and conceptual 
skills learned in Printmaking I. New methods of cre- 
ating multiples will be added to build an advanced 
understanding of techniques previously studied. The 
student will begin to develop an individual direction 
in printmaking. Emphasis will be placed on personal 
expression, an investigation into layering colors, edi- 
tion printing, paper selection, non-toxic studio meth- 
ods, and combinations of relief and planographic 
printmaking processes. Prerequisite: ART287. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART294 Jewelry and Small Sculpture II 

Fall Semester 

This course builds upon the technical and conceptual 
skills learned in Jewelry and Small Sculpture I. New 
methods in precious metal construction, enameling, 
and the lapidary arts will be added to an advanced 
understanding of techniques previously studied. 



328 Course Descriptions 



Emphasis will be placed on personal expression and 
creating a body of work. Classes consist of lectures, 
demonstrations, studio work, and individual and 
group critiques. Prerequisite: ART284. 

3 credit hours, 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART295 Photography II 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

This course provides an introduction to the art, aes- 
thetic, theory, and practice of color photography. 
The student will learn how to print from both nega- 
tives and slides. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
procedure for achieving acceptable color balance 
and maximum print quality. The student will be ex- 
pected to supply his/her own camera (35 mm SLR 
with manual control), paper, and film. Prerequisite: 
ART245 or demonstrated skill. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART296 Publication Design 

Fall Semester 

Students in this course will learn how to design 
commercial, industrial, and personal publications. 
The history of publishing technology, as well as the 
terminology of publication design and production 
will be covered. In this studio course, emphasis will 
be on effective interpretation of content, viewer en- 
gagement and legibility, project planning and orga- 
nization, and typographic excellence. Prerequisites: 
ART218,ART290. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART298/299 Sophomore Portfolio Review 
Spring Semester 

The Sophomore Portfolio Review is held after suc- 
cessful completion of most foundation courses and 
is required of both Fine Arts majors and Graphic 
Design majors. The purpose of the review is to pro- 
vide an opportunity for self-evaluation and profes- 
sional evaluation, and assist and guide the student 
in identifying academic and career interests. Fine 
Art majors register for ART298 and Graphic Design 
majors register for ART299. A grade of "pass" in 
this course is required to continue as a Fine Art or 
Graphic Design major. A grade of "fail" will result 
in the student's major being changed to Provisional 
Fine Art or Provisional Graphic Design, as applies. 



Provisional students must resubmit a portfolio to be 
readmitted to either major. 
1 credit hour. 

ART315 Drawing III 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Drawing II in which 
the student further develops technical and concep- 
tual skills and begins to explore a personal direction 
in traditional, narrative, conceptual, or other genres 
of visual expression. Prerequisite: ART265. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 



1 



ART316 Figure Drawing III 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Figure Drawing II 
in which the student begins to refine technical and 
conceptual skills and explore a personal direction 
in figure drawing. Assigned and individual projects, 
research into contemporary theory on the figure in 
the visual arts, as well as visits to professional art- 
ists' studios are a part of this class. Applying for and 
being awarded entrance to a juried exhibition begins 
the students' professional regimen in the Fine Arts 
discipline. Prerequisite: ART266. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART320 Painting III 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Painting II with fur- 
ther experiences to develop the technical and concep- 
tual skills introduced in both Painting I and II while 
focusing on the development of personal expression 
and style, and includes exploration and self-portrai- 
ture. Alternative surfaces, variously scaled formats, 
and non-traditional compositional techniques are 
also explored. Prerequisite: ART270. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART323 Illustration III 

Spring Semester 

This course builds on the principles and skills learned 
in Illustration II, with an emphasis on professional 
practices and creative concept development in terms 
of both subject matter and medium. Through hands- 
on studio projects students continue to develop their 
own personal style, and with faculty guidance will 



Art 329 



begin to assemble an illustration portfolio and self- 
promotional identity suitable for prospective clients. 
Prerequisite: ART273. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART330 Sculpture III 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Sculpture II that 
includes in-depth involvement with sculptural tech- 
niques and materials, including exploration of larg- 
er-scale sculpture, installations, and environmental 
sculpture. Assigned and individual projects are a 
part of this course, as well as portfolio development. 
Prerequisite: ART280. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART339 Motion Graphics 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introduction to the principles of 
screen-based design and interactivity, both from de- 
sign and production standpoints. Areas of user in- 
terface, animation, sound, typography, and transition 
are explored through hands-on studio experience. 
Emphasis is on content and concept. Survey and 
study of case histories involving interactive CD- 
ROMs and the Internet will be included. Prerequi- 
site: ART290. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART340 Computer Graphics III 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course adds to the skills and concepts learned 
in Computer Graphics I and II with vector-based 
drawing, image editing, and page layout, and also 
introduces the student to Website design and de- 
velopment. In a series of case histories and hands- 
on projects, the student will become familiar with 
the ways that information and graphics can be dis- 
seminated over the web. Creative solutions and in- 
terrelationship of applications will be emphasized. 
Prerequisite: ART290. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART345 Photography III 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

An advanced class in photography allowing the stu- 



dent to expand upon the knowledge and skills gained 
in either Photography I or Photography II. The stu- 
dent will choose specific areas of concentration 
that may include alternative processes. Within his/ 
her chosen area of study, the student will produce 
a cohesive body of work. Prerequisites: ART245, 
ART295, or demonstrated skill. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART365 Drawing IV 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Drawing III with an 
emphasis on independent efforts of the student to 
develop a coherent body of work in an elected area 
of focus. Portfolio development is also part of this 
course. Prerequisite: ARTS 15. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART366 Figure Drawing IV 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Figure Drawing III, 
with an emphasis on independent efforts of the stu- 
dent to develop a cohesive body of work in an elect- 
ed area of focus. Individual projects and portfolio 
development are part of this course, culminating in a 
juried exhibition of the semester's work. Continual 
examination of contemporary works through muse- 
um and gallery visitation further inform the student's 
work. Prerequisite: ART366. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART370 Painting IV 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Painting III in which 
the student develops a cohesive body of work in an 
elected area of focus. Portfolio development is also a 
part of this course. Prerequisite: ART320. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods 

ART373 Illustration IV 

Spring Semester 

This course builds on the principles and skills 
learned in Illustration III, with further emphasis 
on professional practice. It includes a large-scale, 
professional-level independent project. Students 
will continue to refine their personal styles while 



330 Course Descriptions 



I 



building a database of prospective clients and mak- 
ing actual contact for illustration commissions. The 
final illustration portfolio is presented. Prerequisite: 
ART323. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods 

ART380 Sculpture IV 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The student develops a cohesive body of sculpture 
in an elected area of focus. Individual projects and 
portfolio development are a part of this course. Pre- 
requisite: ART330. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART385 Photography IV 

Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Photography III, 
with an emphasis on independent effort on the part 
of the student to develop and complete a cohesive 
body of work in a selected area of photographic 
study area of study. Students will be required to ob- 
serve gallery and museum shows in selected areas. 
Prerequisite: ART345. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART388 History of Photography 

Spring Semester 

This course is a survey of the evolution of pho- 
tography from ancient understandings of the prin- 
ciples of imaging to modern electronic imaging sys- 
tems. The impact of photography as fine art. propa- 
ganda, and social and historical documentation will 
be explored. The student will also become familiar 
with contemporary photographers, their subjects, 
and working methods. Legal issues regarding cen- 
sorship, privacy, and copyright will be presented and 
discussed as well. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART389 History of Graphic Design 

Spring Semester 

This course examines the cultural, historical, po- 
litical, and technological history of graphic design 
from the late 19th century to the present. Emphasis is 
on studying the relationship between societal trends 
and the appearance of mass communication. Topics 
discussed include design during the early industrial 



age, avant-garde influence on graphic design, Ameri- 
can modernism, the advent of Corporate Identity de- 
sign, and postmodern graphic design. Prerequisites: 
ONE of the following: ARTlOl , ART202, ART203, 
ART204,ART205. 
3 credit hours. 

ART390 Art of the Classical World 
Fall Semester 

This course provides the student with a detailed 
overview of the art of the Classical world, em- 
phasizing both the development of the formal style 
and the way in which the artists comment on and 
reflect Greek and Roman cultural ideas. Beginning 
with a brief discussion of pre-Classical Minoan 
and Mycenaean art, the course uses the traditional 
chronological approach (Geometric period. Archa- 
ic period. Early Classical period, etc.) as a frame- 
work for an exploration of Greek and Roman art as 
a reflection of religion, politics, and social customs. 
Prerequisites: ONE of the following: ARTlOl, 
ART204,ART205. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART391 Nineteenth-Century Art 
Spring, odd-numbered years 

This course is a survey of the development of mod- 
ern European art from the neoclassical revival dur- 
ing the Age of Reason to fin-de-siecle symbolism 
and expressionism. Emphasis is placed on studying 
the interrelationship of politics, economics, society 
and art. Topics explored include Romanticism, the 
invention of photography. Impressionism, Fantastic 
and Visionary Art, and Art Nouveau. Prerequisites: 
ONE of the following: ARTlOl , ART204, ART205. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART393 American Art 
Fall, even-numbered years 

A survey of art in the United States from the pre- 
colonial era to the present with emphasis given to 
studying the social, economic, and cultural forces 
that influence the creation of art. Topics explored 
include Folk Art, the Hudson River School. Amer- 
ican Impressionism, the birth of the skyscraper, 
photography. Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and 
contemporary trends. Prerequisites: ONE of the fol- 
lowing: ARTlOl, ART204,ART205. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 



Art 331 



ART394 Twentieth-Century Art I: Fauvism to 
Abstract Expressionism 

Fall, odd-numbered years 

This course surveys the art of the first half of the 20th 
century, from early expressionist experiments such as 
Fauvism and German Expressionism, through Pollock 
and Post- World War II Abstract Expressionism. Em- 
phasis will be placed on analyzing formal qualities of 
art and understanding how politics, economics, soci- 
etal change, and the visual arts interrelate. Topics dis- 
cussed include the trend toward abstraction, Cubism, 
Bauhaus design, Dada, the introduction of conceptual 
art. Surrealism, and the emergence of the New York 
School of painting. Prerequisites: one of the follow- 
ing: ARTlOl, ART202, ART203. ART204. ART205. 
ART391.ART392. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART395 Twentieth-Century Art II: Pop Art 
through the Pluralistic 1990s 

Spring, even-numbered years 

This course surveys the art of the second half of the 
20th century, from Pop Art and challenges to the mod- 
ernist aesthetic through the Pluralist Era of the late 
1990s. Emphasis is placed on formal analysis of art 
and understanding how politics, economics, societal 
change, and the visual arts interrelate. Topics cov- 
ered include British and American Pop, Minimalism, 
the emergence of new genres such as Performance 
Art, Earth and Environmental Art, Video, and Time 
Arts, as well as in-depth discussion of the origin and 
development of post-modern and pluralist theory and 
its expression in the visual arts. Prerequisites: one of 
the following: ARTlOl , ART202. ART203, ART204, 
ART205 , ART39 1 , ART392 , ART394 . 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

ART396 Art Education for Elementary 

Teachers 

Fall-Spring-S um m er Sent esters 

Designed for the Education major as an exploration 
of the elements and principles of visual art, current 
philosophies of art education, and the practical as- 
pects of how to teach art, this course offers hands-on 
experiences in numerous media and simulated teach- 
ing situations. Students will develop an art resources 
portfolio complete with lesson plans, examples, and 
reference materials to assist in elementary education. 
ARTlOl or an art history course is recommended as 
a prerequisite. 

3 credit hours. 



ART397 Art in Recreation: Beyond Arts and 
Crafts 

Spring Semester 

This course is an introduction to the theories, ma- 
terials, and methods of art as therapeutic creation 
and learning how to assist and guide others in us- 
ing art for self-expression and to enhance creativity. 
The student is also introduced to techniques of group 
leadership on topics such as dealing with life-cycle 
events or adapting to physical or emotional loss. 
This course is appropriate for students with profes- 
sional interests in health care, working with special 
populations such as the physically or mentally chal- 
lenged, geriatric groups, individuals in rehabilitation 
facilities, and those in specialized camp settings. 
Visits to area facilities are scheduled. No previous 
art experience is necessary. 
3 credit hours. 

ART398 Junior Design Studio 

Spring Semester 

In this studio course, graphic designers will explore 
areas of personal interest and aesthetics in the cre- 
ation and production of personal projects. Facul- 
ty-mentored, the studio will emphasize process, 
efficient use of time and materials, and effective 
communication with clients and vendors. Through 
periodic pin-ups and critiques, students will have 
the opportunity to discuss critical and formal issues 
central to the creation of a cohesive and meaningful 
project. Prerequisites: ART296, ART340, ART389. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 

ART399 Selected Topics in Art 

This course provides an opportunity to offer spe- 
cialized courses from time to time that are not part 
of the regular Art curriculum. The specific class may 
be suggested by either faculty or students and can 
include, for example, study in a selected art medium 
such as watercolor, an art history topic such as con- 
temporary artists or gallery management. The stu- 
dent may only take this course once. 
3 credit hours. 

ART432 Senior Design Studio 
Fall Semester 

In this senior-level studio, the Graphic Design major 
works on the Senior Thesis, a complex and multi- 
faceted project that requires practical application of 



332 Course Descriptions 



all skills and theories learned in prerequisite courses. 
Students employ methods of concept, process, craft, 
and design to create the solution to this professional- 
level communication problem. With guidance from 
faculty, emphasis is on individual process and ex- 
pression. This thesis is defended and shown at the 
Senior Exhibition. Prerequisites: ART297, ART339, 
ART340. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART435/436 Professional Development 

Seminar 

Fall Semester 

This senior-level studio is an opportunity for the stu- 
dent to develop a professional portfolio of work, as 
well as learn important business issues for the visual 
artist. The Graphic Design student creates a book 
or box portfolio and an accompanying electronic 
portfolio on CD-ROM; the Fine Art student creates 
an artist's statement and series of slides. The culmi- 
nation of this course is a formal presentation of the 
portfolio to a panel of faculty and industry review- 
ers. This seminar prepares the art student for a career 
in visual art or graduate study. Prerequisites: junior 
Art majors only. 

3 credit hours. 

5 studio and lecture periods. 

ART437 Fine Art Seminar 
Fall Semester 

In this studio seminar, the Fine Art major will re- 
fine and develop a focus for the Senior Thesis and 
Exhibition. Lecture, reading, and discussion focus 
on contemporary artists, art theory, and criticism. 
Personal sources are identified, and students will 
illustrate the content and context of their develop- 
ing work within the framework of contemporary art 
practice in written and oral presentations. Studio 
portions of the class are interdisciplinary, focusing 
on student areas of emphasis. Methods for express- 
ing individual sources of inspiration and art ideas 
through various visual formats will be practiced in 
the studio. Prerequisite: senior Art majors only. 

3 credit hours. 

5 lecture and studio periods. 



ART440/441 Senior Portfolio and Exhibition 
(Fine Art/Graphic Design) 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is taken during senior year and is re- 
quired of both Fine Art majors and Graphic Design 
majors. The purpose of the review is to provide an 
opportunity for self-evaluation and professional 
evaluation, and to prepare the student for entry into 
professional fields or graduate study. Students also 
participate in the Senior Art Majors' Exhibition. Fine 
Art majors register for ART440, and Graphic Design 
majors register for ART441 . Prerequisite: senior Art 
majors only. 

1 credit hour. 

ART 440 Fine Art: 3 credit hours, 5 studio 

and lecture periods. 

ART 441 Graphic Design: 1 credit hour. 



ART450, ART451 Art Internship 

Fall-Spring-Siimmer Semesters 

The purpose of the internship is to provide students 
with practical training in art and art-related fields in 
a professional environment, either on or off-campus. 
Responsibilities will vary according to placement as 
determined by the work supervisors of the sponsor- 
ing agency and faculty coordinator. The art intern- 
ship is ideal for students seeking to broaden their 
studio art experiences and explore career interests. 
On-campus internship opportunities include place- 
ment at the York College Galleries. 
3 credit hours. 

ART498, ART499 Independent Study 
Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

These courses provide an opportunity for the stu- 
dent to undertake a well-defined independent project 
in fine art, graphic design, or art history. While the 
student conducts the work under the guidance of a 
faculty member of the student's choosing, the pro- 
ject is carried out in an independent manner without 
regular class meetings. Effective independent study 
is characterized by reduction in formal instruction 
and an increase in the individual's responsibility and 
initiative in the learning process. 
1 to 3 credit hours. 



Behavioral Sciences 333 



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 



BEH200 Introduction to Applied Youth 
Development 

Fall Semester 

This course is designed to be an introduction to ap- 
plied youth development concerning pre-adolescents 
(8-13) and early and middle adolescents (14-19) and 
is designed for students who are considering work- 
ing with youth in fields such as criminal justice, 
education, human services, psychology, recreation, 
and sport management. Youth development is an 
approach that facilitates the development of assets 
that will help youth be successful as adolescents 
and adults. The course will provide students with an 
overview of youth development theories and prac- 
tices. Students in this course will study topics such 
as the history of youth development, the factors and 
environmental structures that contribute to youth de- 
velopment, organizations that offer youth services, 
and issues, challenges, and risks facing youth today. 
3 credit hours. 

BEH260 Statistics for the Behavioral 
Sciences 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to prepare the student for the 
application of elementary statistical tools to labo- 
ratory/field research projects and journal projects/ 
publication preparation. Topics include descriptive 
statistics as tools to summarize and describe groups 
of data, inferential statistics including parametric 
and non-parametric hypotheses testing as tools for 
making inferences about population from samples. 
Students who have taken MAT250 or QBA260 are 
not permitted to take this course. 
3 credit hours. 

BEH490 Behavioral Science Seminar 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This seminar is designed to provide graduating se- 
niors with opportunities to integrate both the the- 



ories and the research techniques acquired during 
their college experiences. Seniors will participate in 
discussions, do original research, and present their 
findings to the class and/or community groups. Re- 
quired of Psychology, Sociology, and Behavioral 
Science majors. Prerequisite: Major of senior stand- 
ing, SOC335, SOC336, or permission of instructor. 
3 credit hours. 

BEH495, BEH496 Behavioral Science 
Internship 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A program that provides on the job experiences to 
qualified students in the application of Behavioral 
Sciences. The student spends a minimum of 120 
hours per semester with a selected agency. The in- 
ternship provides an opportunity to explore job pos- 
sibilities as well as making academic work more 
meaningful. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.5 and 60 credit 
hours. Students must meet the college requirements 
for all internships. This course is graded on a pass/ 
fail basis. 

3 credit hours each semester. 

BEH498, BEH499 Independent Study 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The Independent Study Program affords an op- 
portunity for the student who wishes to undertake 
a well-defined research project. While the student 
conducts his work under the guidance of a faculty 
member of his own choosing, the project is carried 
out in an independent manner without regular class 
meetings. Effective independent study is character- 
ized by a reduction in formal instruction and an in- 
crease in the individual student's responsibility and 
initiative in the learning process. 
1-3 credit hours each semester. 



334 Course Descriptions 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 



Courses for Non-Majors to Fulfill Area III 
Distribution Requirements: 

BIO100 Introduction to Allied Health 

(Non-Lab will not satisfy' Area III Distribution 
Requirement.) This course offers a professional 
orientation for allied health majors and others in- 
terested in learning more about these fields and 
other health related fields. Representatives from 
different areas of health care present information 
on the history, philosophy, science, technology, 
and organization of their respective fields. Other 
topics include specialized methodologies, recent 
developments, and descriptions of how the vari- 
ous disciplines interact with and complement one 
another. 

1 credit hour. 

BIO106 Introduction to Body Structure and 
Function 

Fall Semester 

(Non-Lab will not satisfy Area III Distribution Re- 
quirement.) This course provides an introduction to 
the structure of the human body and the function of 
body organs and systems. Topics include anatomical 
terminology and organization of the body. An over- 
view of all body systems is included. 
3 credit hours. 

BIO110 General Biology 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

General Biology is an introductory laboratory course 
for non-majors. Topics include cell function, me- 
tabolism, and genetics. Students learn how scientists 
think by studying the scientific method and by con- 
ducting experiments in the laboratory. Dissection is 
not a part of this course. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIOlll). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BI0112 Fundamentals of Human Biology 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Designed for the non-Biology major who has an 
interest in how and why the human animal works. 
Emphasis is placed on the structures and functions 
of the major organ-systems of the body. Topics also 



include the physiochemical basis of life as well as 
cell and tissue structure. Laboratories involve mi- 
croscopy, models, and rat dissection to allow a prac- 
tical, "hands-on" approach to the concepts covered 
in lecture. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0113). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO120 Field Natural History 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Field Natural History provides an introduction to the 
biology, evolution, and diversity of life on Earth for 
non-majors. This course is designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with the structure, classification, ecology, and 
evolution of common and unusual organisms that in- 
habit the planet. Both indoor and field-based labora- 
tory sessions introduce the methods of observation, 
identification, and applied ecology of some of the 
more common organisms of southern Pennsylvania 
and the world. Dissection is not a part of this course. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0121). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BI0124 Introduction to Oceanography 

Spring Semesters 

This course covers the major aspects of oceanog- 
raphy. The geological, chemical, and physical aspects 
of oceanography are stressed. Topics covered include 
plate tectonics, currents, tides, wind, waves, light, 
sound, pressure, and physical features of the ocean 
bottom. Human impacts on the ocean are also dis- 
cussed. Not open to high school students. 

2 hours lecture. 

Lab consists of field trips/TBA (BIO 125). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO206 Freshwater Ecology 
Spring Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course focuses on freshwater habitats, such as 
rivers and lakes. In this class, students will explore 
how rivers and lakes form, what animals live within 
them, and how these animals interact with each oth- 
er and their environment. There will also be special 
emphasis on how human activities are impacting 
freshwater environments and the steps necessary to 
help restore these habitats. Concepts learned in class 



Biological Science 335 



will be applied to York County rivers and lakes. 
Laboratory activities will include an introduction to 
the scientific method, overview of local species, and 
field-based experiments. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIO207). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO208 Biology of Animals 
Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

For students interested in studying animals. This 
lecture-lab course focuses on the basic biology and 
behavior of many spectacular animals from both the 
invertebrate and vertebrate worlds. Lecture discus- 
sions will range from animal evolution to migra- 
tion, parental care, sociality, and many other topics. 
Laboratory will involve handling and observing liv- 
ing animals and will make connections to classroom 
discussions. Dissection is not a part of this course. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIO209). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR IIL 

BIO210 Introduction to Marine Biology 
Fall Semesters 

This course takes an ecological approach to study- 
ing marine biology by focusing on the environ- 
mental characteristics, adaptations of organisms, 
and the communities found in the major marine 
ecosystems such as rocky shore, estuary, salt marsh, 
sandy beach, and coral reef. The course places more 
emphasis on the biotic communities found in each 
of these environments rather than the chemical and 
physical aspects of those environments. The impact 
of humans' influence on these environments is also 
studied. Not open to high school students. 

2 hours lecture. 

Lab consists of field trips/TBA (BI0211). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR IIL 

BI0212 Environmental Biology 
Fall Semester 

This course is an introduction to applied ecology for 
non-majors. Class meetings review basic biological 
and ecological principles, including ecological ef- 
ficiency, nutrient cycling, biological diversity, and 
population growth. Past and current environmental 
issues, such as resource use and pollution, are ex- 
amined in light of ecological principles. Laboratory 
sessions are field-oriented and examine natural and 



human-impacted aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. 
This class will be of interest to Education and Recre- 
ation majors. BIO150 or BIOllO recommended, but 
not required. Dissection is not a part of this course. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0213). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BI0216 Microbes: Unseen Life on Earth 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course, developed by the American Society of 
Microbiology and the National Science Foundation, 
is designed for the non-science major who is inter- 
ested in the unseen world of microorganisms. The 
course investigates these invisible strangers from 
both an environmental and a basic science perspec- 
tive. Four major topics that are studied include: the 
importance of microbes in the recycling of organic 
matter, the evolutionary significance of microscopic 
organisms, case studies related to microorganisms 
and emerging infectious diseases, and the future use 
of microbes in such areas as agriculture and environ- 
mental cleanup as well as their role in antibiotic re- 
sistance. The laboratories are investigative in nature, 
and students use microscopy and other techniques to 
learn how microbes function. 

2 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0217). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BI0232 Plant Taxonomy and Seasonal Flora 
Summer Mini-mester, Summer II 

This course provides a study of flowering plants of 
this area with comparisons made to flowering plants 
from other geographical regions. Collection and 
identification of most frequently seen families are 
emphasized. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0233). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

Courses for Majors in Biology and Related 
Fields 

BIO150 Biology! 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The first course for Biology and Allied Health ma- 
jors introduces the principles of molecular and cel- 
lular biology. The flow of life-sustaining energy 
is studied in the context of molecular and cellular 



336 Course Descriptions 



structure. The structure and function of DNA and the 
mechanism by which genetic information is inher- 
ited, utilized, and experimentally manipulated, are 
covered in detail. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0151). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BI0152 Biology II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an overview of biology at the or- 
ganismal level. The concepts of phylogeny and ecol- 
ogy are discussed in the context of how organisms 
are categorized and organized into the latest taxo- 
nomic versions. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0153). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO200 Introduction to Scientific Research 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A broad introduction to skills needed to pursue a 
career in biology. Writing, obtaining, and using sci- 
entific literature and the use of scientific software are 
emphasized. The course also considers research de- 
sign and the basics of data analysis and presentation. 
The creation of a proposal for senior thesis is an im- 
portant course requirement. Prerequisites: BIO150 
and BIO 152 or permission by the instructor. It is 
strongly recommended that BIO200 be completed 
before enrolling in 300-level biology electives. 

3 hours lecture. 

3 credit hours. 

BIO220 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

Fall Semesters 

This course is recommended for students seeking ca- 
reers in health-related fields. A study of the structure 
and function of the human body is offered utilizing 
a systems approach. Emphasis is placed on the gross 
and microscopic anatomy as well as the physiology of 
the cell, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous 
system. Dissection is required. Prerequisite: BIO150. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0221). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BI0222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 

Spring Semesters 

As a continuation of BIO220, emphasis is placed on 



the gross and microscopic anatomy as well as the 
physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, uri- 
nary, reproductive, endocrine, and digestive systems. 
Dissection is required. Prerequisite: Completion of 
BIO220 with a 2.0 or higher. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0223). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO230 Microbiology 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Microbiology is the study of organisms that can only 
be seen with a microscope. The emphasis in this course 
is to learn about bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites 
of medical interest. The goal is to provide a basic un- 
derstanding of the principles of microbiology, and to 
equip students with knowledge of, and techniques in, 
microbiology that can be beneficial to them in both 
their professional and personal lives. The course is 
designed using the educational guidelines from the 
American Society of Microbiology. This course may 
not be used to fulfill an upper-division elective for 
Biology majors. Prerequisite: BIO150. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0231). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO240 Genetics 

Fall-Spring Semester 

The basic principles of Mendelian, non-Mendelian, 
and molecular genetics are considered in this course. 
The structure and function of the gene, patterns of 
inheritance, gene interaction, and gene regulation 
are discussed. The laboratory component emphasiz- 
es molecular biology and experimental approaches 
to genetics. Prerequisite: BIO150. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0241). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

BIO300 Ecology 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an introduction to the study of 
the relationships of organisms to their environment 
and each other as a means for understanding their 
distribution and abundance. Topics of study include: 
autecology (dispersal, habitat selection, abiotic tol- 
erances), population dynamics (structure, growth, 
life history variation), community ecology (species 
diversity, equilibrium, succession) and species inter- 



Biological Science 337 



actions (competition, predation). Both field-based 
laboratories and lecture material focus on develop- 
ing skills in observation, logical scientific inquiry, 
and written repoits. Prerequisites: BIO150, BI0152. 
Recommended: BIO200. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIO301). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO302 Zoology 

Spring Semester, even-numbered years 

A continuation of the animal biology introduced in 
Biology 11 (BI0152). The focus is on the general 
structural and functional biology of the higher in- 
vertebrates and the vertebrates. Laboratories include 
both comparative histology and anatomy and also 
data-oriented experiments involving animal behav- 
ior and physiology. Small groups also complete in- 
dependent research projects of their own design. Pre- 
requisite: BIO150. BI0152. BIO200. and BIO240 or 
permission by the instructor. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory {BIO303). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO304 Botany 

Fall Semester, even-numbered years 

Selected non-vascular and vascular plants are studied 
with a view toward their phylogenetic relationship. 
Morphological and physiological variations that ex- 
ist from the cellular to the organismal level will be 
noted. Laboratory topics provide opportunities for 
students to see and critically analyze selected non- 
vascular and vascular plants and to make applica- 
tion of the principles and terminology gained from 
the lecture experience. Prerequisite: BIO150 and 
BI0152. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIO305). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO306 Animal Behavior 

Spring Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course is an introduction to the behavior of wild 
animals in their natural environments. Behavioral 
adaptations are viewed in terms of possible evolu- 
tionary costs and benefits. Mechanisms behind be- 
haviors are explored with an emphasis on neural and 
endocrine organization. Laboratory involves inde- 
pendent research projects in both lab and field set- 



tings. Prerequisite: BIO 150, BIO 152, BIO200, and 
BIO240 or permission by the instructor. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIO307). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO308 Animal Physiology 
Fall Semester, even-numbered years 

This course presents principles of animal physiology 
with an emphasis on the functional biology of verte- 
brate and higher invertebrate animals. Physiological 
systems are discussed as evolutionary adaptations to 
environmental challenges. The laboratory stresses 
the collection, analysis, and reporting of experimen- 
tal data. Prerequisite: BIO150, BI0152, BIO200, 
and BIO240 or permission by the instructor. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BIO309). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO310 Plant Morphology/Embryology 

Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

The structural differences within mature forms of 
angiosperms is noted through studies of life his- 
tories of selected species. Early gametophytic pat- 
terns leading to early embryo patterns are stressed 
for selected local species. Prerequisite: BIO 150 and 
BIO 152. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0311). 

4 credit hours. 

BI0312 Plant Systematics 

Spring Semester, even-numbered years 

Plant Systematics is designed to acquaint students 
with plant relationships and how we interpret the 
phylogenetic meaning of those relationships. It will 
provide discovery methods and principles of botani- 
cal systematics, look at various classification systems, 
review structural and biochemical evidence, and ex- 
amine speciation and species concepts. All of this will 
be made meaningful through laboratory experiences 
reflecting on green plant phylogeny from selected ex- 
amples of the earliest Viridophytes through flowering 
plants. Special attention will be paid to plants easily 
obtained in these environs. BIO 150 and BIO 152, or 
their equivalents, are prerequisites. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory {BI0313). 

4 credit hours. 



338 Course Descriptions 



BI0324 Marine Ecology of the Chesapeake 
Bay 

Fall Semester, even-numbered years 

The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth un- 
derstanding of marine ecology using examples from 
the Chesapeake Bay environment. Topics covered 
will include the history of the bay, hydrography, 
plankton ecology, bottom communities, fisheries, 
and human impacts on the bay. The laboratory com- 
ponent will include independent research on top- 
ics related to Chesapeake Bay ecology as well as a 
weekend field trip to the Bay. Prerequisite: BIO 150 
andBI0152. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0325). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO330 Biology of Microorganisms 

Fall Semester 

Microbiology is the study of living organisms that 
can only be seen with a microscope. It also includes 
viruses, which are microscopic but not cellular. As 
a basic science, it provides the biologist with an ex- 
cellent experimental model for studies of essential 
life processes. Microbiology is also concerned with 
many applied fields, such as medicine, agriculture, 
and industry. Both the basic and applied areas of mi- 
crobiology will be explored in this course through 
readings, lectures, laboratories, and written and oral 
reports and exams. Prerequisite: BIO240. 

3 hours lecture. ; 
1 three-hour laboratory (BI0331). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO350/CHM350 Biochemistry 

Fall Semester 

This course is an introduction to the composition 
of and interactions between molecules of biological 
significance, including nucleic acids, proteins, car- 
bohydrates, and lipids. The course is taught with 
an emphasis on the structure-function relationship 
of each molecule with regard to supporting life. 
Coordinated labs utilize modern as well as classi- 
cal biochemical techniques to reinforce lecture con- 
cepts. Prerequisite: BIOI50 and CHM234. BIO240 
is recommended. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0351). 

4 credit hours. 



BI0352 Biochemistry II 

Spring Semester 

This course is a continuation of BIO350/CHM350 
that explores in greater detail the role of carbohy- 
drates, lipids, and glycoconjugates in membrane 
structures and metabolism. The course is taught with 
an emphasis on the structure-function relationship of 
each molecule with regard to supporting life, includ- 
ing discussions of medically relevant diseases asso- 
ciated with these molecules. Coordinated labs utilize 
modern as well as classical biochemical techniques 
to reinforce lecture concepts. Prerequisite: BIO350 
or CHM350. BIO240 is recommended. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0353). 

4 credit hours. 

BI0354 Immunology 

Spring Semester 

This course provides an introduction to the basic prin- 
ciples of immunology, including the areas of innate 
and adaptive immunity, antigen-antibody interactions, 
the role of immunology in health and disease, as well 
as its uses in laboratory analyses. In the laboratory stu- 
dents utilize the techniques of serology, cell biology, 
and biochemistry to study the immunology of animal 
models. Written and oral reports are an essential part 
of both the lecture and laboratory components of the 
course. Prerequisite: BIO150. Also recommended: 
BIO230, BIO240, or BIO330. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0355). 

4 credit hours. 

BI0356 Reproduction and Developmental 
Biology 

Spring Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course involves the study of biomolecules, cells, 
tissues, organs, and organisms as a function of time. 
The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved 
in the production of gametes and the differentiation 
of a single zygote into a multicellular organism are 
elucidated using a variety of animal models. The 
successful completion of an independent research 
project is the capstone requirement of this course. 
Prerequisite: BIO240. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0357). 

4 credit hours. 



Biological Science 339 



BI0358 Cell and Molecular Biology 
Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course examines the molecular mechanisms of 
eukaryotic cell function. The relationship between 
form and function at the molecular and cellular level 
are discussed from topics ranging from transcription 
to cellular signaling. The laboratory component pro- 
vides the students with experience in modern mo- 
lecular techniques used to study cellular function. 
Prerequisite: BIO240. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0359). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO370 Evolutionary Biology 
Spring Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course examines the fundamental evolutionary 
processes by which the diversity of life on Earth is 
explained. Topics include the history of evolutionary 
thought, mechanisms of natural selection, violations 
of Hardy-Weinberg, population genetics, phyloge- 
netic trees, the formation and evolution of species, 
and critical thinking on how to study evolutionary 
change. Students work with living organisms during 
lab to generate biological evolution. Computer sim- 
ulations are used to reinforce concepts from lecture 
and lab. Prerequisites: BIO150. BI0152, BIO240. 
Recommended: BIO300. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0371). 

4 credit hours. 

BIO400 Senior Thesis 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

The Biology Department's capstone course that 
culminates the research process that began with In- 
troduction to Scientific Research (BIO200). Senior 
Biology majors organize and present their own pre- 
viously obtained research data or research proposal 
as a poster and as a professionally written document. 
Students begin the course by presenting a detailed re- 
search progress report to a Biology Faculty Review 
Panel for evaluation. Students are permitted to com- 
mence with Senior Thesis only if sufficient research 
progress has been demonstrated. The course empha- 
sizes presentation-enhancing computer software, 
technical aspects of scientific writing, and speaking 
before critical audiences. At the end of the semes- 
ter, oral poster presentations are given for evaluation 



by Biology faculty. Students also submit a profes- 
sionally written research report or research proposal. 
Prior to registering for this course, it is mandatory 
that each student has already established a working 
relationship with a full-time, on-campus member of 
the Biology faculty. 

1 hour lecture. 

1 credit hour. 

BIO402 Biological Internship 

This experience is designed to expose the student to 
the reality of working in a biological field through 
direct participation. As such, the student engages in 
meaningful, professional, substantive work experi- 
ences related to the students' scientific interests. Bi- 
ology internships may involve research with a fac- 
ulty member, or participation in off-campus work- 
shops or employment. Prerequisite: 60 credits of 
completed coursework, cumulative GPA of at least 
2.50, and departmental approval. 
3 credit hours. 

BIO406, BIO408 Independent Study 

This experience allows a student to do biological re- 
search under the supervision of a faculty member. 
A research proposal developed in the Introduction 
to Scientific Research course can be conducted in 
this course and the results of the study utilized for 
the Senior Thesis course. Prerequisite: 60 credits of 
completed coursework. cumulative GPA of at least 
2.50, and departmental approval. 

Two semesters. 

Maximum six credits. 

Wallops Island Marine Science Consortium 
Classes 

York College is a member of the Marine Science 
Consortium at Wallops Island, Virginia. The Ma- 
rine Science Consortium offers a series of un- 
dergraduate and graduate courses in marine and 
environmental sciences. Courses taken at the Wal- 
lops Island Marine Science Consortium may be 
transferrable to York College for degree credits. 
With prior departmental approval. Biology majors 
may utilize one course as an upper-division elec- 
tive toward their degree requirements. Additional 
information is available in the Biology Department 
office (LS206) and at the Consortium's website, 
www.msconsortium.org. The following is a list of 



340 Course Descriptions 



courses commonly available at the Consortium; YMS343 

however, the Consortium website will contain the YMS345 

most up-to-date information: YMS362 

YMS431 

YMS2 1 1 Field Methods in Oceanography YMS432 

YMS221 Marine Invertebrates YMS450 

YMS250 Wetlands Ecology YMS464 

YMS260 Marine Ecology YMS49 1 

YMS331 Chemical Oceanography YMS493 

YMS342 Marine Botany YMS500 



Marine Ichthyology 
Marine Ornithology 
Marine Geology 
Ecology of Marine Plankton 
Marine Evolutionary Ecology 
Coastal Geomorphology 
Biological Oceanography 
Coral Reef Ecology 
Behavioral Ecology 
Problems in Marine Science 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUS150 Introduction to Business 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is intended to give students a founda- 
tional understanding of the role and function of the 
business enterprise. The aspects of business that will 
be explored include: accounting, finance, leadership, 
management, marketing, strategy, operations, human 
resources, organizational behavior, and information 
systems. Ethics, economics, service/volunteerism, 
the international marketplace, demand creation, an 
organization's value chain, and supply chain man- 
agement will also be discussed. Students will have 
multiple opportunities to improve their communica- 
tion and teamwork skills. Preference will be given 
to the following majors: undecided business majors, 
undecided majors, and those other students inter- 
ested in exploring business careers. Enrollment is 
limited to students with less than 60 credits com- 
pleted who have not completed other 100-level and 
200-level Business courses. 
3 credit iiours. 

BUS218 Personal Finance 

Fall Semesters 

This course is designed for students in all majors. 
Methods are developed for use in making personal 
decisions about credit, leasing, renting, insurance, 
investing, taxes, retirement and estate planning, and 
purchasing durable goods. 
3 credit hours. 

BUS345 Business Law I 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

A study of the domestic and international legal en- 



vironment of business including business ethics, the 
U.S. Constitution, the judicial system, torts, crimi- 
nal law, intellectual property, cyber law and e-com- 
merce, contracts, domestic and international sales 
and lease contracts, and negotiable instruments. Se- 
lected articles from the Uniform Commercial Code 
and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for 
the International Sale of Goods will be studied. 
3 credit hours. 

BUS346 Business Law II 

Spring Semester 

This course is an advanced legal study for students 
seeking a professional career in business or govern- 
ment. Emphasis is placed on the study of creditors" 
rights, bankruptcy, agency law, employment and la- 
bor relations, legal forms of business organizations, 
business ethics, government regulations, real and 
personal property, bailments, insurance, wills, trusts 
and elder law, professional liabilities, and interna- 
tional legal environments. This is a writing/commu- 
nication-intensive course. Prerequisite: Completion 
of BUS345 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

BUS490, BUS491 Business Internship 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A business internship is a short-term, business-re- 
lated work experience designed to allow students to 
gain meaningful, pre-professional work experience 
in their field of study prior to graduation. Internships 
require students to meet periodically with a faculty 
supervisor, provide a written deliverable, and par- 
ticipate in an end-of-internship evaluation. Prereq- 



Chemistry 341 



uisite: Junior standing and departmental approval of 
each student participant's individual program. The 
program requires approximately 10 hours per week 
for 12 weeks. Grading will be pass/fail. 
3 credit hours each semester. 

BUS492, BUS493 Business Internship 

A business internship is a short-term business-relat- 
ed work experience designed to allow students to 
gain meaningful, pre-professional work experience 
in their field of study prior to graduation. Internships 
require students to meet periodically with a faculty 
supervisor, provide a written deliverable, and par- 
ticipate in an end-of-internship evaluation. Prereq- 
uisite: Junior standing and departmental approval of 
each student participant's individual program. The 
program requires approximately 10 hours per week 
for 12 weeks. Students admitted to the Dual Degree 
Program must also schedule MBA506 with BUS492 
and"MBA507 with BUS493 to fulfill the work expe- 
rience requirement. Grading will be pass/fail. 
3 credit hours each semester. 

BUS495 Business Strategy and PoMcy 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A capstone course that examines the policy-making 
and planning process from the management per- 
spective. This course provides a dynamic, practi- 
cal, hands-on approach that encourages students 
to immerse themselves in the vision, research, and 
planning aspects of a new business venture. It is 



designed to: (1) integrate business learning that 
has occurred across the course of the students un- 
dergraduate experience; (2) teach students how to 
research, develop, and write detailed business plans 
that can be used to create successful businesses: and 
(3) provide students with exposure to relevant, con- 
temporary business topics through periodic presen- 
tations by local business professionals. Prerequisite: 
senior standing, completion of 90 credits and com- 
pletion of ACC225, BUS345, ECO201. FIN300, 
IFS305, MGT150, MGT350, MKTIOO, QBA265, 
or QBA310 with grades of 2.0 or higher. This is a 
writing/communication-intensive course. Students 
enrolled in this course during the fall and spring 
semesters are required to take a comprehensive ex- 
amination in business. A grade of 2.0 or higher is 
required in this course to graduate. 
3 credit hours. 

BUS498, BUS4g9 Independent Study 

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu- 
nity for the student who wishes to undertake a well- 
defined research project. While the student conducts 
his work under the guidance of a faculty member 
of his own choosing, the project is carried out in an 
independent manner without regular class meetings. 
Effective independent study is characterized by a re- 
duction in formal instruction and an increase in the 
individual student's responsibility and initiative in 
the learning process. 

1-3 credit hours each semester. 



CHEMISTRY 



CHM102 Chemistry and Society 

Fall or Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to be an issues-oriented 
chemistry literacy course for non-science majors. 
Basic science and chemistry concepts are broadly 
applied to the study of topics that may include the 
atmosphere, global warming, energy, water, acid 
rain, nanotechnology, nuclear energy, polymers, and 
nutrition. An underlying theme is the evaluation of 
information and risk/benefit choices. The laboratory 
includes field trips, field studies, and in-lab experi- 
ments. Prerequisite: IFLIOI. 

2 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM203). 



3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

CHM104 Foundations in Chemistry 
Fall Semester 

This course is an introduction to fundamental 
chemical principles, specifically designed for stu- 
dents deficient in basic science and math skills. 
Topics include calculator math, unit conversation, 
states of matter, atoms, molecules, simple reac- 
tions, and the mole. 
3 credit hours. 

CHM122 Principles of General and Organic 
Chemistry 

Fall-Spring Semesters 



342 Course Descriptions 



This course is designed specifically for majors 
requiring a single semester of chemistry as a con- 
tinuation from high school chemistry. The course 
emphasizes general chemistry principles that are 
essential to continuing study in the health scienc- 
es. The course includes a brief introduction to or- 
ganic functional groups. Prerequisite: high school 
chemistry. Students with weak high school back- 
grounds are advised to complete CHM104 (Foun- 
dations of Chemistry) before enrolling in CHM122. 
CHM123. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM123). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

CHM130 First-year Chemistry Colloquium 

This course will introduce Chemistry and Forensic 
Chemistry majors to topics related to the practice of 
Chemistry as a profession. Students will learn details 
and background material that will enable them to un- 
derstand the significance of current research projects 
and internships that are ongoing in the department. 
Students will gain practical information about how 
to become a lab assistant, a research assistant, an in- 
tern, and the importance of networking at regional 
and national meetings. Discussion topics will also in- 
clude issues of current interest to chemists including 
environmental chemistry, chemistry of new materi- 
als, nuclear chemistry, and electrochemistry. 

1 three-hour class period. 

1 credit hour. 

CHM134 General Chemistry I 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This introductory Chemistry course is recommend- 
ed for all science and Engineering majors as well as 
Clinical Lab Science, Pre-medical, Pre-dental, Pre- 
veterinary, and Pre-pharmacy majors. The course 
includes an introduction to stoichiometry, atomic 
structure, chemical bonding, properties and reac- 
tions of inorganic compounds, introductory thermo- 
dynamics, acids and bases, and oxidation-reduction 
reactions. Prerequisite: Two semesters of high school 
algebra or the equivalent. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM135). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

CHi\/n36 General Chemistry II 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

General Chemistry II is a continuation of CHM134. 



This semester is a study of gas laws, states of matter, 
thermodynamics, acids and bases, ionic equilibria, 
electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and descriptive 
chemistry of the elements. Prerequisite: CHM134 
with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM137). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

CHM146 Advanced Chemistry II 
Spring Semester 

This course is an advanced version of General Chem- 
istry II suitable for Chemistry and Forensic Chemis- 
try majors, and other science majors with a strong 
desire to study chemistry. The topics to be studied 
include an examination of the properties of the dif- 
ferent phases of matter, solutions and their proper- 
ties, rates of reactions and the variables that control 
them, equilibrium in chemical reactions, acid-base 
chemistry, an introduction to thermodynamics, and 
electrochemistry. When possible, connections to up- 
per-level Chemistry courses will be made in order to 
prepare students for future courses in the Chemistry 
program. Prerequisites: CHM134 with a grade of 2.5 
or higher. 

3 class periods. 

2 three-hour laboratory period (CIIM147). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

CHM150 Introductory Seminar in 
Computers for Chemists 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is required for all Chemistry majors 
(preferably in the freshman or sophomore years). The 
course is primarily an introduction to computer tech- 
niques such as molecular modeling and the use of 
spreadsheets in chemistry. Freshmen and sophomores 
will be working together and will engage in discus- 
sions concerning the latest developments in software 
for chemists. The course will involve seminars, dem- 
onstrations, and hands-on use of computers. 

1 class period. 

1 credit hour. 

CHM152 Introductory Seminar in Chemistry 
Issues, Ethics, and Experimental Design 

Spring Semester 

This course is required for all Chemistry majors 
(preferably in the freshman or sophomore years). 
The course focuses on issues and ethical choices that 



Chemistry 343 



a professional chemist faces in daily work. Fresh- 
men and sophomores will be working together with 
instrumentation in chemistry through an experimen- 
tal design project. The course will involve seminars, 
demonstrations, and hands-on use of computers. 

1 class period. 

1 credit hour. 

CHi\/1234 Organic Chemistry I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Organic Chemistry I focuses on the study of carbon 
compounds. An integrated study of the nomencla- 
ture, properties, stereochemistry, synthesis, and re- 
actions of aliphatic compounds including alcohols 
will be presented. The relationship between struc- 
ture and reactivity is developed for each class of 
compounds. Mechanisms are stressed. This course 
will also cover introductory spectroscopic analysis. 
Prerequisite: Either CHM136 or CHM146 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 

3 class periods. 

1 laboratory period (CHM235). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

CHI\/1236 Organic Chemistry II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of CHM234. Reactions 
of aromatic, carbonyl, and amine compounds will 
be studied. Additionally, this course covers radical 
as well as oxidation/reduction reactions. Advanced 
spectroscopic analysis will be presented. Mechanisms 
and synthetic strategies will continue to be stressed. 
Prerequisite: CHM234 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM237). 

4 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 



CHM336 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry 
Fall Semester 

This analytical course covers classical methods of 
chemical analysis that are augmented by the use of 
new titrants and ion selective electrodes. The theory 
and techniques of gravimetric, volumetric, and po- 
tentiometric analysis are discussed. Prerequisites: 
Either CHM136 or CHM146 with a grade of 2.0 or 
higher. 

2 class periods. 

2 three-hour laboratory periods (CHM337). 

4 credit hours. 



CHM338 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry 

Spring Semester 

This course provides an introduction to the theoreti- 
cal principles and applications of modern instrumen- 
tal methods of analysis. Topics include spectroscopy, 
chromatography, elemental analysis, surface analysis, 
and electrochemical techniques. Prerequisites: Either 
CHM136 or CHM146 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
2 class periods. 

2 three-hour laboratory periods (CHM339). 
4 credit hours. 

CHM344 Physical Chemistry I 

Fall Semester 

As an introduction to quantum chemistry, this course 
will begin with a detailed examination of the elec- 
tronic structure of atoms and molecules and build an 
understanding of how to predict properties and reac- 
tivities of chemical substances. The course includes 
extensive discussion of modern computational tech- 
niques as well as practical exercises involving mo- 
lecular modeling. Prerequisites: CHM150, PHY112 
(or PHY 162), CHM236, MAT271 , MAT272 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM345). 

4 credit hours. 

CHM346 Physical Chemistry 11 

Spring Semester 

This continuation of Physical Chemistry is a calcu- 
lus-based examination of molecular spectroscopy, 
group theory, non-ideal gases, statistical mechanics, 
thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, and chemical 
kinetics. All topics are presented from a purely mo- 
lecular-level viewpoint, building from the theoretical 
principles discussed in Physical Chemistry I. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM344 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (CHM347). 

4 credit hours. 

CHM350/BIO350 Biochemistry I 
Fall Semester 

This course is an introduction to the composition 
of and interactions between molecules of biologi- 
cal significance, including nucleic acids, proteins, 
carbohydrates, and lipids. The course is taught with 
an emphasis on the structure-function relationship 
of each molecule with regard to supporting life. 



344 Course Descriptions 



Coordinated labs utilize modern as well as classi- 
cal biochemical techniques to reinforce lecture con- 
cepts. Prerequisite: BIO150 and CHM234. BIO240 
is recommended. 

3 hours lecture. 

1 three-hour laboratory (BI0351). 

4 credit hours. 

CHM362, CHI\/I364, CHIV1366, CHI\/i368 
Special Topics in Chemistry 

These are upper-level courses focusing on chemis- 
try-related topics that are of particular interest to sci- 
ence majors but that are not currently covered in the 
Chemistry curriculum. Subject matter may include 
advanced Chemistry topics as well as topics that 
have immediate impact on our society. Courses may 
be offered in either a lecture format or a combination 
of lecture and laboratory. 
3 credit hours. 

CHM434 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

This advanced course in organic chemistry is a study 
of the principles and applications of physical, theo- 
retical, and mechanistic organic chemistry. Topics 
include methods of synthesis of organic molecules, 
kinetics and mechanisms of organic reactions, struc- 
ture-activity relationship, and spectroscopy. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM236 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

CHM444 Inorganic Chemistry 

Fall Semester 

This course is a study of the descriptive and theoreti- 
cal aspects of modern inorganic chemistry. Topics 
include atomic structure, bonding theories, acid-base 
concepts, chemistry of the main group elements, co- 
ordination chemistry and the transition elements, 
and selected topics of current interest. Prerequisite: 
CHM236 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 



3 credit hours. 

CHM451 Capstone Laboratory Experience 

Spring Semester 

This course is required for all Chemistry majors 
(preferably in the senior year). This one-semester 
laboratory experience will be designed to integrate 
four broad areas of chemistry including inorganic, 
physical, organic, and analytical chemistry. Suc- 
cessful completion of CHM346 and CHM338 is 
required. 

1 three-hour laboratory period. 

1 credit hour. 

CHM481,CHM482 Independent Study 

This course sequence represents in-depth study in a 
specialized area of chemistry that is chosen by the 
student. This may involve novel research that con- 
tributes to the general knowledge of science or a re- 
view of topics that connects the existing knowledge 
in a new way. Faculty mentoring plays an integral 
role in the completion of this course as does the 
fostering of student responsibility for the learning 
and research processes. Prerequisite: CHM336 and 
CHM338. 

1-6 credits per semester. 

CHM490 Chemistry Internship 

This off-campus internship is designed to give the 
students an opportunity to make use of the practical 
aspects of their classroom knowledge, thus devel- 
oping their confidence and understanding through 
experience. The corporate supervisor and the fac- 
ulty supervisor will evaluate student's performance. 
Prerequisites: Junior standing, CHM236, and de- 
partmental approval of each participant's individual 
program. 

3 credit hours. 



CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE 



CLS401 Clinical Microbiology** 

Identification and clinical pathology of bacteria, 
fungi, viruses, and parasites. Techniques to isolate, 
stain, culture and determine antimicrobial suscepti- 
bility. Instrumentation; quality control. 



CLS402 Clinical Chemistry** 

A study of enzymology, endocrinology, biochemis- 
try of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, metabolism 
of nitrogenous end products, physiology and me- 
tabolism of fluids and electrolytes, and toxicology 
as related to the body and diseases. The technical 



Communication 345 



procedures include colorimetry, spectrophotometry, 
electrophoresis, chromatography, automation, and 
quality control. 

CLS403 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation*'' 

A study of the composition and function of blood: 
diseases related to blood disorders; the role of plate- 
lets and coagulation. Manual and automated tech- 
niques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities. 

CLS404 Clinical Immunohematology^^ 

A study of blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatch- 
ing, hemolytic diseases, and related diagnostic tests. 
An in-depth study of blood donor service and its 
many facets such as transfusions, medico-legal as- 
pects, etc. 



CLS405 Clinical Immunology/Serology** 

A study of immune response, immunoglobulins, au- 
toimmunity, and complement and related tests and 
disease. Survey and demonstration of serological 
diagnostic tests. 

CLS406 Clinical Seminar** 

Courses not included in the above, such as orienta- 
tion, laboratory management, education, or clinical 
microscopy; and other courses unique to the indi- 
vidual hospital program. 

**These courses are taken at the hospital where the 
students have been admitted for their clinical (se- 
nior) year in the Clinical Laboratory Science major. 



COMMUNICATION 



CM100, CIVn01,CM102, CM103 Public 
Speaking Practicum 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

The practicum courses are directed experiences in 
verbal and nonverbal communication, performance, 
listening, and other special topics. Credit is given for 
speeches made in the community, on campus, and/or 
with the Forensics Team at intercollegiate competi- 
tions. 

1 credit hour per semester up to 4. ' ^' • ' 

CM104 Human Communication 

Fall-Spring Semester 

This course provides an introduction to the dynam- 
ics of human communication. This course addresses 
communication needs in your professional and per- 
sonal life. In order to meet this goal, Human Com- 
munication focuses on (1) effective communication 
when speaking to another person, (2) communicat- 
ing effectively when making decisions in a group 
setting, and (3) speaking effectively to an audience. 
Speaking, listening, and writing critically are ex- 
pected in all course activities. 
3 credit hours. 

CM120 Broadcast Performance I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The intent of this course is to introduce the student 
to the fundamental elements necessary to perform in 



an audio or video production. Special emphasis is 
placed upon development of the voice and camera 
presence. Students are expected to learn basic an- 
nouncing techniques and appropriate bearing and 
movement before the camera. Students can expect 
to learn different techniques used to perform in a 
variety of program formats, including news, talk, in- 
terviews, promotional spots, advertising, and public 
service announcements. 
3 credit hours. 

CM132, CM133, CM134, CM135 Radio 
Practicum 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The Radio Practicum courses are an opportunity to 
participate in the various activities of an on-air radio 
station, including announcing, news gathering and 
presentation, programming, copy writing, and CD, 
MPS. and record library activities. 

1 credit hour per semester up to 4. 

CM150 Beginning Sign Language 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introduction to American Sign 
Language, including the manual alphabet, an intro- 
duction to deaf culture, basic signs, and the history 
and place of signed communication in society. 
1 credit hour. 



346 Course Descriptions 



CIVI206 Communication Theory 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an introduction to the most im- 
portant theories and principles of communication. 
Students learn to appreciate the use of theory and its 
application to a wide variety of communication con- 
texts and behaviors. Prerequisite: CM 104 or taken 
concurrently with CM 104. 
3 credit hours. 

CM207 Rhetoric and Public Address 

Spring Semester 

This course develops the study and research of the 
theoretical, philosophical, and historical bases of 
rhetorical theory from the ancient Greeks and Ro- 
mans through the present day. Emphasis will be 
placed on rhetoric as a practical art (public address) 
and as scholarly pursuit (rhetorical criticism). Stu- 
dents will evaluate contemporary speeches applying 
developed skills. 
3 credit hours. 

CIVI211 Mass Communication 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides a survey of the theories, tech- 
nologies, industries, and practice of mass communi- 
cation. Included is an examination of the media as an 
institution of both popular culture and art, as well as 
the development of critical evaluation skills neces- 
sary for understanding the effects of mass communi- 
cation on society. 
3 credit hours. 

CM212 Public Speal<ing 

Spring Semester 

This course studies the theory and performance of 
public speaking. Emphasis placed on audience anal- 
ysis and the rhetorical situation. Organization, con- 
tent, style, and delivery will be studied. Prerequisite: 
CM104. 

3 credit hours. 

CM221 Introduction to Public Relations 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course examines theory, strategies, and ethics 
used in the practice of public relations. Students 
focus on research, planning, audience reach, and 
evaluation of public relations in corporate, govern- 
mental, educational, and international settings. Stu- 
dents are introduced to written, spoken, and visual 



communication techniques. Students are evaluated 
by exams, quizzes, and a paper exploring an area of 
public relations. 
3 credit hours. 

CM222 Nonverbal Communication 

Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course will identify and discuss the primary 
categories of nonverbal communication behavior 
utilized in daily communication activities. Material 
will be applied to a variety of common communica- 
tion contexts, i.e. interpersonal, business, and aca- 
demic relationships. 
3 credit hours. 

CM226 Audio Production 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Audio Production I is an introductory course to the 
technology utilized in audio production and audio re- 
cording. Students will receive instruction in studio/ 
control room recording techniques (i.e. acoustics, 
analog audio mixers, connectivity, microphone de- 
sign/ placement, and storage devices). Students will 
learn the process of recording live talent using digi- 
tal technologies. Students are expected to produce 
professional quality audio projects. Application of 
audio production to radio and television broadcast- 
ing will also be discussed. 
3 credit hours. 

CM231 Radio Production 

Fall-Spring Semester 

This course develops theory and practice in radio 
studio production techniques, including operation 
of studio and control room equipment and remote 
production techniques. Students produce a variety of 
program material. Prerequisite: CM226. 
3 credit hours. 

3 hours practicum. 

Cl\/I242 Video Production I 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides a study of the practical and aes- 
thetic facts in basic video production, including the 
operation of cameras, lighting, performance, studio 
functions, editing, and electronic field production. 
Industry opportunities and practices are also ad- 
dressed. Prerequisite: CM226. 

4 credit hours. 

4 hours practicum. 



Communication 347 



CM250 Advanced Sign Language 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a more intensive examination of 
signed languages and deaf culture and an emphasis 
on language skills and increased vocabulary. Prereq- 
uisite: CM150. 
1 credit hour. 

CM271 Print Media Writing 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an overview of the theory and 
practice of gathering, writing, and editing material 
for the media, including news stories and other types 
of articles used by the media. Students will learn 
journalistic style and contemporary media writing 
formats. In addition, the course will include legal 
and ethical considerations as well as responsibilities 
of journalists. 

3 credit hours. 

CM304 Group Discussion 

Fall Semester, even-numbered years 

This course provides a study of the theories and skills 
associated with group decision making and problem 
solving. Students learn the elements of participation 
and leadership, and will develop an understanding of 
how groups operate. 
3 credit hours. 

CiVISIO Argumentation and Debate 

Fall Semester, even-numbered years 

This course is an examination of traditional and 
contemporary theories of argumentation and debate 
including methods of reasoning in argumentation, 
issue analysis, and the strategy and tactics of case 
construction. Students will participate in debates. 
3 credit hours. 

Cl\/I320 Broadcast Performance II 

Spring Semester 

This is an upper-level course designed to develop 
the talent of the student seriously considering a 
career in professional audio or video performance. 
This course will focus on development of a rec- 
ognizable and believable persona appropriate for 
most of the formats common to radio and televi- 
sion. Extensive attention is given to voice, move- 
ment, appearance, and camera/microphone pres- 
ence. The course also focuses on development of 
a professional audition portfolio for audio and/or 



video. Prerequisites: CM120, CM226, CM231, 
CM242. 

3 credit hours. 

CM321 Writing for Public Relations 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to develop knowledge, skill, 
and abilities in the production of public relations 
materials for print, broadcast, and web-based media. 
Students are required to produce a portfolio of writ- 
ten materials, which may include media kits, bro- 
chures, releases, fact sheets, backgrounders, news- 
letters, feature articles, speeches, and public service 
announcements. Students are evaluated by exams 
and the quality of their written work. Prerequisites: 
CM221 andCM271. 
3 credit hours. 

CM322 Media Relations 
Fall Semester 

This course offers knowledge and skills in under- 
standing local, regional, national, and international 
media needs, function, and demands; theories and 
methods in developing news; pitching stories, fa- 
cilitating and accommodating media in news confer- 
ence, briefing, and on-scene locations. The course 
will involve developing of media list matrix; cover- 
age planning: sequential time planning, video news 
release development, production and satellite distri- 
bution; on-scene staging, pool coverage, web-based 
media support, coverage measurement and cost- 
benefit analysis, audience analysis. Prerequisites: 
CM221 andCM321. 
3 credit hours. 

CM323 Publications Editing and Design 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course will offer students the opportunity to 
learn and apply editing and design techniques to 
organizational publications. Students will learn to 
conceptualize, create, and design public relations 
materials for a variety of printed media to reach tar- 
get audiences. Students will use appropriate desk- 
top publishing software. While prior knowledge of 
publishing software is not necessary, students should 
have sufficient familiarity with computers to quickly 
learn how to use the software. Prerequisite: CM321. 
3 credit hours. 



348 Course Descriptions 



CM324 Public Relations Events and 
Promotions 

Spring Semester 

Events are an important public relations tactic to 
communicate an organizational or client message to 
targeted publics in a dramatic, memorable way. This 
course details how events are used to help an orga- 
nization or client meet goals and objectives. Topics 
include developing a strategic action plan for activi- 
ties, budget, timetable, promotions, and communica- 
tion, working with volunteers and the community; 
tactics involved with implementation of the event; 
and evaluation of the event's effectiveness toward 
meeting goals. Prerequisite: CM221. 
3 credit hours. 

CM327 Persuasion 
Fall Semester 

A study of the history and theory of persuasion is 
the focus of this course. Course content includes a 
critical examination of the elements of persuasion, 
how persuasion functions in society, and the effects 
of communication contexts upon the structure of the 
persuasive message. Prerequisite: CM206. 
3 credit hours. 

CM328 Organizational Communication 

Spring Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course is an examination of how communi- 
cation functions within an organizational setting. 
Course content focuses on the theories, flow, pur- 
pose and media used by organizations to communi- 
cate. Attention is also given to the methods by which 
organizational communication is evaluated. Prereq- 
uisite: CM206. 

3 credit hours. 

CM329 Interpersonal Communication 

Spring Semester 

Students will combine current theories of interper- 
sonal communication and related concepts and apply 
these to daily interpersonal interactions with friends, 
family, peers, and coworkers. Prerequisite: CM206. 
3 credit hours. 

CM330 Nonlinear Editing 
Fall Semester 

This course is a study of nonlinear editing tech- 
niques used in the television and video industries. 
It is primarily concerned with the editing process in 



so far as it concerns projects, which regardless of the 
origination format will be finished on a videotape 
format. Prerequisite: CM341 . 
3 credit hours. 

CM332 Broadcast Media Writing 
Spring Semester 

This course emphasizes the application of cre- 
ativity in copy writing and production of radio, 
television commercials, public service announce- 
ments, campaigns, and programs and promotions 
for broadcast and web-based platforms. Students 
concentrate on client need, audience analysis, idea 
conceptualization, scripting, timing, and produc- 
tion technique integration. Students are respon- 
sible for the production of script copy portfolios 
and spot or program production. Prerequisites: 
CM226 and CM242. 
3 credit hours. 

CM333 Broadcast Portfolio I 

Spring Semester 

Broadcast Portfolio I offers the student the oppor- 
tunity to obtain practical experience in basic studio 
and field production of a broadcast quality live and 
pre-recorded program. Students are responsible for 
performing most of the tasks involved in program- 
ming of this type. Prerequisite: CM242. 
3 credit hours. 

CM336 Audio Production II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a continuation of Audio Production 
I, stressing a higher level of technical and aesthetic 
skills. Instruction focuses on developing the complex 
skills involved with computer-based audio produc- 
tion and digital audio mixing consoles as it applies 
to music, radio, and video production. The Federal 
Communication Commission's rules and regulations 
that apply to the practical issues of audio production 
will also be discussed. Prerequisites: CM226 and 
CM211orMUS297. 
3 credit hours. 

CM340 News Writing and Production 
Fall Semester 

This intensive newsroom and studio course intro- 
duces students to broadcast journalism, newsgath- 
ering, and producing and on-air newscast delivery. 
Students are responsible for learning and using 



Communication 349 



digital affiliate news products and computer-based 
news production software. This course requires ex- 
tensive concentration to local, regional, national and 
international news, the art and practice of news writ- 
ing, and serves as the foundational course for those 
interested in careers in broadcast news producing, 
reporting and anchoring. Prerequisite: CM226 and 
CM242.^ 

3 credit hours. 

CM341 Video Production II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This advanced digital video production course con- 
centrates on the art and practice of documentary sto- 
rytelling. Students are required to critically research 
and effectively pitch a documentary story, and its 
production process, including storyline, treatment, 
budget, equipment, execution, and distribution. Af- 
ter concept approval, students will apply elements 
of video composition and pre- and post-production 
techniques in shooting and editing a factual or reali- 
ty-based documentary project. Students also engage 
in aesthetic criticism throughout the process. Prereq- 
uisite: CM242. 

4 credit hours. 

4 hours practicum, 

CIVI355 Radio/TV Reporting 
Spring Semester 

This advanced news course involves the study 
and skill development of news reporting including 
newsgathering skills, style, live and package pro- 
duction, and journalistic ethics. Students who in- 
tensely desire a career in broadcast news reporting, 
photojournalism and news editing will be required 
to cover local news and produce broadcast quality 
field reports. Each student will produce air-checks 
and resumes, and prepare a career plan to enter 
broadcast news upon graduation. Prerequisite: 
CM340. 

3 credit hours. 

CIVI402 Communication Seminar 

Fall Semester 

This capstone course for Public Relations and 
Speech Communication majors involves an inten- 
sive examination of communication theories and 
concepts through directed research and writing. 
Students develop skills in qualitative and quantita- 
tive research and data analysis. Course evaluation 



requires successful completion of a formal com- 
munication or public relations research project. 
Prerequisite: The completion of 90 credit hours, 
including 12 credits in Speech or Public Relations 
courses. 

3 credit hours. 

CM410 Media Management 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course explores the duties, tasks, and respon- 
sibilities of a media manager within a multi-dimen- 
sional corporate environment. Issues of staffing, 
budgeting, production scheduling, equipment acqui- 
sition, planned obsolescence, and delivery mecha- 
nisms will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on planning and managing expanding appli- 
cations of media technologies throughout the orga- 
nization. Prerequisite: CM242. 
3 credit hours. 

CM415 Public Relations Planning 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an in-depth study of the stra- 
tegic planning process used in developing, imple- 
menting, and evaluating public relations programs 
to achieve organizational objectives. Award- winning 
public relations strategies are analyzed to determine 
how practitioners solve problems in a variety of situ- 
ations. Prerequisite: CM221. 
3 credit hours. 

CM421 Public Relations Campaigns 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Students work as agency groups responsible for the 
development of a public relations campaign for a lo- 
cal client organization. Students are evaluated by ex- 
ams, assessment of campaigns, and related presenta- 
tions. Prerequisites: CM321 and CM415. 
3 credit hours. 

CM423 Crisis Communications Management 
Spring Semester 

This course is designed to help prepare future public 
relations managers to plan for and to manage com- 
munications for organizations during a crisis. Top- 
ics include: defining and identifying types of crises, 
developing communications plans for crises, defin- 
ing and understanding the roles of risk management 
and issues management, and learning techniques for 
managing communications before, during, and after 



350 Course Descriptions 



a crisis event. Students will develop a crisis commu- 
nication plan. Prerequisite: CM415. 
3 credit hours. 

CM426 Audio Production III 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Audio Production III is designed for students with 
a strong commitment to the study of music record- 
ing and production. The course provides an inten- 
sive analysis of field and studio recording techniques 
with an emphasis on multi-track audio production 
and engineering. Techniques of music production, 
sound design, and live/field recording are exam- 
ined. Prerequisites: CM336, MUS 181, MUS 1 82 and 
(MUS200orMUS290). 
3 credit hours. 

CM431 Advanced Production 
Fall Semester 

Advanced Production affords students the opportu- 
nity to concentrate for a semester on the intensive 
production of professional quality narrative, docu- 
mentary, journalistic, and/or experimental video 
projects. Prerequisite: CM341. 
3 credit hours. 

CM433 Broadcast Portfolio II 

Spring Semester 

This course offers eligible students practical expe- 
rience in advanced television studio and field pro- 
duction duties, tasks and responsibilities for the pur- 
pose of producing a live and pre-recorded broadcast 
quality program. Students will assume the roles of 
above-the-line personnel. Prerequisite: CM341. 
3 credit hours. 

CM434 Media Law and Ethics 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course examines both the law and ethics of me- 



dia use as they apply to the concerns of the public 
relations and media professional. Issues covered 
include privacy, censorship, defamation, obscenity, 
access to information, false advertising, and media 
regulations, among others. Prerequisite: CM206. 
3 credit hours. 

CM444 Special Topics in Communication 

This course involves a study of selected themes and 
issues in communication, such as gender communi- 
cation, health communication, and political commu- 
nication. The specific topics may be suggested by 
faculty members or students. Students may take this 
course only once. 
3 credit hours. 

CM450, CM451 Communication Internship 

These courses are planned and supervised work ex- 
periences in oral or written communications at se- 
lected cooperating firms or organizations. They in- 
clude supplementary training conferences, reports, 
and appraisals. Prerequisite: 60 credits completed, 
2.5 or higher overall GPA, and departmental approv- 
al of each student participant's individual program. 
3 credit hours. 

CM498, CM499 Independent Study 

These courses provide an opportunity for the student 
who wishes to undertake a well-defined research 
project. While the student conducts work under 
the guidance of a faculty member of his or her own 
choosing, the project is carried out in an independent 
manner without regular class meetings. Effective in- 
dependent study is characterized by a reduction in 
formal instruction and an increase in the individual 
student's responsibility and initiative in the learning 
process. Prerequisite: 60 credits completed and 2.5 
or higher overall GPA. 
1 - 3 credit hours. 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 



CS100 CPADS (Computer Science Practice 
and Design Studio) 
Fall Semester 

This course introduces basic topics in computing. 
PC hardware components will be discussed along 
with assembly of a system. The students will then 
install several different operating systems and set up 



a basic network configuration. A team design project 
will introduce basic programming structures using a 
simple scripting language. 

2 credit hours. 
1 lecture hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 



Computer Science 351 



CS101 Fundamentals of Computer Science I 

Spring Semester 

This course introduces the fundamental techniques 
of algorithm design and program construction using 
procedural constructs. Topics will include problem 
analysis; algorithm design; and implementation and 
debugging strategies using good programming prac- 
tices. The course will cover basic data structures 
including variables, arrays, strings, records, and 
pointers; and control structures including decisions, 
iterations, functions, and file I/O. The course will 
focus on applications from computer science and 
engineering using C/C++/C#. 

2 credit hours. 
1 lecture hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 

CS201 Fundamentals of Computer Science II 

Fall Semester 

This course introduces advanced object-oriented 
constructs such as abstraction, virtual methods, and 
generic classes. Advanced data structures including 
arrays, linked lists, queues, stacks, trees, heaps, and 
hash tables will be discussed both natively as well 
as through standard template libraries. Fundamental 
sorting and searching algorithms will be introduced. 
Basic analytical and proof techniques will be used 
to characterize the data structures and algorithms 
discussed. The course will focus on implementing 
applications from computer science and engineering 
using languages such as C-i-i-/C#/Java. Prerequisite: 
CSlOl with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 

4 credit hours. 

CS320 Software Engineering and Design 

Spring Semester 

This course describes the software development 
process in detail, including the software life cycle 
and models of software development; requirements 
analysis and software design techniques, including 
structured analysis and object-oriented approaches; 
techniques for software quality assurance, including 
design reviews, testing, metrics, and an introduction 
to program verification; and software project plan- 
ning, organization, and management. Students will 
be expected to participate in a team-programming 
project. Prerequisite: CS201 or IFS201 with a grade 
of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 



CS340 Programming Language Design 
Fall Semester 

This course examines the semantics of programming 
languages. Topics include formal specifications of 
syntax, declarations, binding, allocation, data struc- 
tures, data types, control structures, control and data 
flow; the implementation and execution of programs: 
and functional programming versus imperative 
programming. Other possible topics include non- 
procedural and logic programming; object-oriented 
programming; and program verification. Program- 
ming projects will provide experience in a number 
of computer languages. Prerequisite: CS201 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

CS350 Data Structures 

Spring Semester 

This course is an in-depth examination of important 
data structures, their algorithms, and implementa- 
tion techniques. Both abstract and concrete data 
structures are discussed including sequences, stacks, 
queues, maps, sets, graphs, array lists, linked lists, 
skip lists, search trees, heaps, and hash tables. Stu- 
dents will implement and apply the data structures 
through a series of programming assignments. Pre- 
requisites: CS201 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. , ,, 

CS360 Analysis of Algorithms 

Spring Semester 

This course studies fundamental algorithms, strate- 
gies for designing algorithms and mathematical tools 
for analyzing algorithms. Fundamental algorithms 
studied in this course include graph algorithms; al- 
gorithms for sorting and searching; hashing; integer 
arithmetic; and selected combinatorial tasks. Math- 
ematical tools include asymptotic notations and 
methods for solving recurrences. Algorithm design 
strategies include the greedy method, divide-and- 
conquer, dynamic programming, and randomization. 
Prerequisites: CS201 and MAT235 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

CS370 Computer Graphics Programming I 
Fall Semester 

This course introduces the fundamental concepts 
in computer graphics programming. Topics include 
color models, basic coordinate transformations and 



352 Course Descriptions 



clipping, raster and vector models, and basic render- 
ing techniques. Additional topics may include texture 
mapping and ray tracing. Students will demonstrate 
these topics through projects using a standard graph- 
ics API as the programming platform. Prerequisite: 
CS20I or IFS201 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

CS420 Operating Systems 

Fall Semester 

This course provides an introduction to the funda- 
mentals of operating systems. Topics include inter- 
process communication, process scheduling, dead- 
lock, memory management, virtual memory, file 
systems, and distributed systems. Formal principles 
are illustrated with examples and case studies of 
one or more contemporary operating systems. Also, 
students will study a widely used operating system 
such as Windows or UNIX with an emphasis on sys- 
tem programming for the operating system. Topics 
include kernel design, the I/O system, scheduling 
algorithms, process control, interprocess commu- 
nication, system calls, and memory management. 
Prerequisite: CS340 or ECE260 with a grade of 2.0 
or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

CS456 Social and Professional Issues in 
Computing 

Spring Semester 

This course studies the social impact, implications 
and effects of computers, and the responsibilities of 
computer professionals in directing the emerging 
technology. Specific topics include an overview of 
the history of computing, computer applications and 
their impact, the computing profession, the legal and 
ethical responsibilities of professionals, and careers in 
computing. Prerequisite: A minimum of 89 credits. 
3 credit hours. 

CS481 Senior Software Project I 
Fall Semester 

Student teams will complete a substantial project 
provided by sponsors drawn from both industry and 
research organizations. These projects will be devel- 
oped under the direction of the course instructor and 
members of the sponsoring organization. Prerequi- 
site: CS320 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 



CS482 Senior Software Project II 
Spring Semester 

This course is an elective course for Computer Sci- 
ence majors. It is a continuation of CS481 (Senior 
Software Project I). It is also to be taken by the stu- 
dent (or student team) provided the project begun in 
CS481 is considered to be large enough to warrant 
two full semesters of project activity. The course 
instructor and members of the sponsoring organiza- 
tion will determine if this condition is met. The two 
most likely cases are: projects of a type that have 
taken two semesters when they have been completed 
by student-industry teams before, or projects which 
grow into a larger project as unforeseen positive 
results in CS48I warrant further investigation into 
a fruitful area(s) that will take another semester to 
complete. Prerequisite: CS48I. 
3 credit hours. 

CS490 Computer Science Internship I 

This is an elective course for Computer Science 
majors. In it, the student carries out a planned 
and supervised work experience in the field of 
computer science at a selected cooperating firm. 
The student may undergo supplementary training 
provided by the firm. The student will be required 
to submit a final report of the internship experi- 
ence and will be subject to a final performance ap- 
praisal by his/her employer. The program requires 
approximately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. 
Prerequisite: A minimum of 60 credits and cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.5. 
3 credit hours. 

CS491 Computer Science Internship II 

This is an elective course for Computer Science 
majors. In it, the student carries out a planned 
and supervised work experience in the field of 
computer science at a selected cooperating firm. 
The student may undergo supplementary training 
provided by the firm. The student will be required 
to submit a final report of the internship experi- 
ence and will be subject to a final performance ap- 
praisal by his/her employer. The program requires 
approximately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. 
Prerequisite: CS490. 
3 credit hours. 



CS495, CS496, CS497 
Computer Science 



Special Topics in 



Criminal Justice 353 



This course is designed to present relevant topics in 
the rapidly changing computer field. This course will 
typically be restricted to upper-level computer sci- 
ence majors and offered based on staff availability 
and student interest. 
3 credit hours. 

CS498 Independent Study 

This course enables a student to carry out undergradu- 



ate research or in-depth study in a specialized area of 
computer science. A faculty member of the student's 
choice will advise the work which may or may not 
have regular class meetings. Effective independent 
study is characterized by guidance rather than formal 
instruction by faculty with an increase in student ini- 
tiative and responsibility for their own learning. 
1-3 credit hours. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



CJA101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

This course is designed to provide students with an 
understanding of criminal justice as an academic dis- 
cipline, of the social and historical context of crime 
and justice in a democracy, and of the administration 
of America's criminal justice system. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA102 Introduction to Security and Asset 
Protection 

An introduction to the theories, history, and contem- 
porary practices involved in asset protection. Cover- 
age includes private investigation and the security 
service industry. Student preparation for the Certi- 
fied Protection Officer (CPO) examination will also 
be included. Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA110 Juvenile Delinquency 

This course introduces students to the history and 
development of the concept of delinquency, nature 
and extent of delinquency, theories of delinquency, 
and environmental influences on delinquency. Pre- 
requisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA203 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice 

The course introduces students to the foundations of 
philosophical and moral thinking. These principles 
are then related to criminal justice settings with cas- 
es and readings that focus on professional oriented 
ethical issues encountered in the administration of 
justice. Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA230/FCM200 Introduction to Criminalistics 

This is the first course in the Forensic Science cur- 



riculum and the Criminalistics minor. It is designed 
as a scientific overview of several areas of forensic 
science. Some of the areas of study are: history of 
criminalistics, experts in the field of forensic sci- 
ence, fingerprinting, impression evidence, handwrit- 
ing analysis, glass analysis, firearms, forensic serol- 
ogy, fire debris, and expert witnesses. Laboratory 
time is spent analyzing evidence discussed in several 
of these topics. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory (CJA231/FCM201). 

4 credit hours. 

CJA295 Criminal Justice Research Methods I 

The course introduces students to research design 
most useful for the study of criminal justice prob- 
lems, program evaluation, and policy analysis. The 
course will focus on the advantages and limitations 
and the appropriateness of specific methodological 
approaches. A grade of 2.0 or higher is required. Pre- 
requisite: CJAIOI. 

3 credit hours. ; 

CJA302 Criminal Law 

An examination of the general principles of substan- 
tive criminal law including the general principles of 
criminal liability and the elements and defenses to 
criminal cases. Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA303/WGS303 Gender and Crime 

This course examines the variations of punishment 
and patterns in female criminality vs. male criminal- 
ity across age, class, and race. This course will also 
review the strengths and weaknesses of theories of 
crime as applied to women as victims and offend- 
ers and explores the occupational segregation by 



354 Course Descriptions 



gender in criminal justice professions. Prerequisite: 
CJAIOI. 

3 credit hours. 

CJA304 Legal Standards of Security/Asset 
Protection 

An examination of federal, state, and local laws, that 
impact upon the protection of assets and the conduct 
of investigations. Standards of professional practice, 
licensing, administrative regulations, civil liability, 
and law relating to employment practices will be 
covered. Prerequisite: CJAlOl . 
3 credit hours. 

CJA305 Criminal Investigation 

This course examines the fundamental principles 
and practices of criminal investigation. Intelligence 
acquisition, surveillance, interviewing and inter- 
rogation, crime scene investigation, physical evi- 
dence, and the legal aspects of investigation will be 
addressed. Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA310 Victimology 

This course provides students with a global perspec- 
tive on the study of victimology and an overview 
of the history, development, and current treatment 
of crime victims within the criminal justice system. 
Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA311 Crime Prevention and Physical 
Security 

This course involves a comprehensive and critical 
examination of practices used by business, govern- 
ment, and non-profit organizations to reduce the 
harm associated with violence, theft, and terrorism. 
Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA323 Fire and Explosion Investigation 

Methods of scientific analysis are used in the inves- 
tigation of fires, bombs, and explosives, bullets and 
cartridges. Glass and document evidence are also 
examined. The value of the evidence and its presen- 
tation in court are discussed. Prerequisite: CJA230. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA334 Policing in America 

A critical examination of the historical development 



of law enforcement in the United States, policing re- 
forms, the role of law enforcement in a democracy, 
and current trends and issues. Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA336 Judicial Process 

This course uses a social science and policy analy- 
sis perspective to examine the history and structure 
of America's adult courts, the interrelationships be- 
tween the court system and its social, economic, and 
political environments, as well as the major partici- 
pants in the court, the trial process, and sentencing. 
Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA337 Punishment and Corrections 

This course reviews and examines the history of 
criminal punishment, rationales for punishment, 
correctional reforms, the structure of modern prison 
systems, community based corrections, intermediate 
sanctions, and current issues. Prerequisite: CJAIOI. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA341 Criminal Procedure 

A survey and analysis of the procedural process of 
the criminal justice system as determined by the 
United States Constitution and United States Su- 
preme Court decisions, along with the remedies 
available for the violation of these rights. Prerequi- 
site: CJAIOI. 

3 credit hours. 

CJA347 Community-Based Corrections 

An examination of the historical development of the 
major community-based correctional programs (pro- 
bation and parole) and intermediate sanctions, the re- 
lationship between the community and correctional 
system, current community coirectional programs, 
including restorative justice, as well as an evaluation 
of their efficacy utilizing the latest research findings 
and evaluation studies. Prerequisites: CJAIOI . 
3 credit hours. 

CJA348 Juvenile Justice 

The course focuses on the contemporary juvenile 
justice system by reviewing and analyzing recent 
legal cases, research studies, evaluation reports, and 
public policy initiatives in the field of juvenile jus- 
tice. Prerequisites: CJAIOI and CJAl 10. 
3 credit hours. 



Criminal Justice 355 



CJA349 Comparative Criminal Justice 

Examines the incidence of crime, measures of crime, 
and criminal justice policies and procedures from a 
comparative perspective. While the primary focus 
is on a comparison between the United States and 
other common-law countries, additional countries 
are also examined. Prerequisites: CJAlOl and junior 
standing. 

3 credit hours. 

CJA360, CJA361 Experiential Learning in 
Criminal Justice 

This course is designed to provide students with 
an introduction to the field of criminal justice as 
a profession. Each student will complete a mini- 
mum of 120 hours in an assigned field placement 
so that he/she can obtain familiarity with one area 
of the criminal justice field. Students will be ex- 
pected to reflect critically on their field experience, 
using their knowledge of theory and policy. Stu- 
dents are limited to a maximum of six credit hours. 
Each credit hour requires 40 hours of field place- 
ment. Prerequisite: An application is required dur- 
ing the semester preceding the academic term in 
which the student desires to perform the experien- 
tial learning; approval of the instructor prior to the 
beginning of the internship; minimum GPA2.5; and 
junior/senior standing. This course is graded on a 
pass/fail basis. 

3 or 6 credit hours. 

CJA362/FCM362 Crime Scene Processing 

This hands-on course focuses on the proper meth- 
ods of processing a crime scene to find the physi- 
cal evidence, protect it, document it, package it, and 
transport it to the laboratory facility. Scene security, 
sketching, photography, evidence packaging and 
fingerprint processing will be covered. Mock crime 
scenes will also be used as teaching aids. Prerequi- 
site: FCM200/CJA230. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA364 Policing Communities 

This course examines the ways through which police 
services are delivered to communities. The underly- 
ing philosophies guiding police service delivery and 
specific strategies will be discussed and assessed by 
examining recent empirical research studies. Atten- 
tion will be paid to contemporary law enforcement 
reforms such as community policing, zero-tolerance 
policing, and problem-oriented policing, and how 



these reforms are translated into police practice. Pre- 
requisite: CJAlOl . 
3 credit hours. 

CJA380 Special Topics in Criminal Justice 

An intensive examination of a specialized topic in 
the field of criminal justice. Topics will vary accord- 
ing to the instructor. May be taken more than once 
provided the subject matter is not repeated. Maxi- 
mum of 6 hours of credit. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA383 White Collar Crime 

The course will introduce students to a variety of 
topics and issues in the white collar crime area. The 
course will examine types, causes, and the measure- 
ment of white collar crime. Specifically, the course 
will review the debate regarding the definition of 
white collar crime, overview the costs of the white 
collar and corporate crime, examine the various the- 
ories of white collar criminality, and explore the use 
of criminal sanctions to address this type of crimi- 
nality. Prerequisite: CJAlOl . 
3 credit hours. 

CJA386 Death Investigation 

This course provides students with an understanding 
of the death investigation process and laws pertain- 
ing to death investigation. Various types of death 
will be discussed, with an emphasis on the death in- 
vestigator's role. Prerequisite: CJAlOl. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA396 Criminal Justice Statistics 

This course reviews appropriate descriptive and 
inferential statistical techniques for use in criminal 
justice research. Topics include descriptive statistics 
as a tool to summarize and describe groups of data, 
and inferential statistics including parametric and 
nonparametric hypotheses testing as tools for mak- 
ing inferences about population from samples. Stu- 
dents will be required to use these techniques in the 
classroom and computer lab when creating and ana- 
lyzing datasets using SPSS. Prerequisites: CJAlOl 
andCJA295. 

3 credit hours. 

CJA401 Security Planning and Supervision 

This course focuses on the human resource man- 
agement aspects of security/asset protection. Selec- 
tion, training, and supervision of protective services 



356 Course Descriptions 



personnel will be covered. Student preparation for 
completion of the security supervisor program will 
be included. Prerequisite: CJAlOl . 
3 credit hours. 

CJA403 Conflict Analysis and Management 

This course explores the fundamentals of conflict 
analysis and its management, settlement, or resolu- 
tion in a variety of settings, including the admin- 
istration of justice. Also, the course is designed to 
develop student skills in the analysis of conflicts 
using negotiation, mediation, collaborative problem 
solving, and other processes and techniques. Prereq- 
uisites: CJAlOl and junior standing. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA405 Substance Abuse and the Criminal 
Justice System 

The course will explore the nature of the drug-crime 
relationship and provide an overview of the history 
and development of drug control policies in Ameri- 
ca. Prerequisites: CJAlOl and junior standing. 
3 credit hours. 



CJA491 Senior Seminar 

This capstone criminal justice course provides stu- 
dents with the opportunity to integrate and synthe- 
size previous coursework in criminal justice. Draw- 
ing upon this knowledge, students will be required 
to engage in significant research, demonstrating 
proficiency in the use of criminal justice information 
resources, research methodologies, and statistics. 
Prerequisites: CJAlOl, CJA295, CJA396, and 12 
additional hours in Criminal Justice. 
3 credit hours. 

CJA498, CJA499 Independent Study 

Independent study or research on a selected subject in 
criminal justice under the direction of a faculty mem- 
ber with the approval of the program coordinator. Pri- 
or to registering for the course, a student must prepare 
a written proposal and secure an individual faculty 
member's approval. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor and Criminal Justice Coordinator, junior/ 
senior standing, and 12 hours in Criminal Justice. 
1-3 credit hours each semester. 



EARTH/SPACE SCIENCE 



ESS152 Earth and Space Science 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Earth and Space Science is an introductory laborato- 
ry-oriented course that includes a study of the basic 
principles of geology and astronomy. By using the 
scientific method, the course covers a study of the 
earth, the study of the formation of common rocks 
and minerals, rock classification, mountain building, 
the structure of the earth, geological processes that 
create the surface landscape, plate tectonics, geologic 
and topographic maps, the solar system, planetary 
motion, the sun and star evolution, the moon and ce- 
lestial observation. Field trips are part of this course. 

2 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (ESS 153). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

ESS154 Introduction to Astronomy 

Spring Semesters, odd-numbered years 

This laboratory-oriented introductory course will 
examine: historical aspects of astronomy; evidence 
of the origin and evolution of the universe, galax- 
ies, stars, solar system, and earth; space exploration- 



past, present and future; and a detailed investigation 
of our solar system with emphasis on the sun, moon 
and planets. Mathematical computations, computer 
activities, and field trips to observatories and plan- 
etariums are part of this course. 

2 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory period (ESS155). 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR III. 

ESS481, ESS482 Independent Study in Earth 
Sciences 

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth 
study in a specialized earth science area. This 
may involve novel research that contributes to the 
general knowledge of earth science or a review of 
topics that connects the existing knowledge in a 
new way. Faculty mentoring will play an integral 
role in the completion of this course as will the 
fostering of student responsibility for the learning 
and research processes. Prerequisites: ESS 152, 
MATI05, PHYIIO, PHY112, or by instructor's 
permission. 



Economics 357 



ECONOMICS 



ECO200 Principles of Economics (Macro) 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

The study of aggregate or total economic activity. 
Topics such as employment, inflation, and produc- 
tion are analyzed in relation to national economic 
policies. This course is not open to freshmen. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

ECO201 Principles of Economics (Micro) 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

The study of individual decision makers within the 
economy. Price and output determination is explained 
by the interaction of supply and demand, the behav- 
ior of the firm and the household, and the impact of 
various market structures. Prerequisite: Completion 
of ECO200 with a grade of 2 .0 or higher. This course 
is not open to freshmen. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

ECO300 Economic Perspectives 

Fall Semester 

This course is designed to help students to "think 
like economists." It puts economics in the context of 
other social sciences by applying economic analy- 
sis to general questions of social organization. The 
course emphasizes the ongoing evolution of social 
systems. A variety of topics will be considered in 
class. There will also be opportunities for students 
to apply economic analysis to topics of individual 
interest. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

EC0325 Mathematical Economics 

Application of mathematical analysis to economic 
concepts is presented. Mathematical techniques 
such as derivatives and linear algebra are uti- 
lized. Particular attention is given to static analy- 
sis, comparative-static analysis, and optimization 
problems in economics. Prerequisite: Completion 
of ECO201 and MAT 120 with grades of 2.0 or 
higher. 

3 credit hours. 

ECO340 Economic Development 

An examination of the political, social, and econom- 
ic problems and policy issues of developing coun- 
tries in achieving adequate economic development. 



Theories of economic growth and their relevance to 
current problems such as capital formation, popula- 
tion, growth, inequality, poverty, unemployment, in- 
ternational investment, and international assistance 
are discussed. Prerequisite: Completion of ECO201 
with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ECO350 Intermediate Microeconomics 

Spring Semester 

The foundations of price theory, including an analy- 
sis of consumer and firm behavior, competition and 
efficiency, factor markets, income distribution, and 
general equilibrium. Prerequisite: Completion of 
ECO201 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ECO360 Intermediate Macroeconomics 
Fall Semester 

This course expands on the study of national in- 
come accounting, price level fluctuations, issues of 
unemployment, and the impact of monetary and fis- 
cal policies on income level and distribution. Mac- 
roeconomic policy targets and policy making are 
examined in depth. Generations of macroeconomic 
theory and the leading macroeconomists associated 
with each are also studied. Prerequisite: Completion 
of ECO200 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ECO370 Money and Banking 
Spring Semester 

An analysis of money and credit and their relation 
to economic activity and prices; organization, opera- 
tion, and functions of the commercial banking sys- 
tem; structure, objectives, functions, and instruments 
of control of the Federal Reserve System; monetary 
policy and international financial relationships. Pre- 
requisite: Completion of ECO360 and FIN300 with 
grades of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

EC0375 History of Economic Thought 

A study of the history of economic thought from 
the time of Adam Smith to the present. The events 
and ideas of the great economists are explored in 
order to understand their convergence to contem- 



358 Course Descriptions 



porary economic crossroads. Prerequisites: Com- 
pletion of ECO310 and ECO350 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

ECO390 Managerial Economics 
Spring Semester 

This course is a study of economic principles as 
they relate to the operations of a modern business. 
The course is designed as a bridge between the 
traditional economic theory and the application of 
microeconomic analysis. Supply and demand anal- 
ysis, production functions, market structure, and 
financial forecasting are the topics of emphasis. 
Prerequisites: completion of FIN300 with a grade 
of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IBS400 International Economics (formerly 
ECO400) 

Spring Semester 

A study of factors affecting international trade, in- 
cluding resource allocation, motives for methods 
of protectionism, foreign exchange and currency 
valuation, international debt, the role of risk in in- 
ternational trade and finance, and economic growth. 
Prerequisite: Completion of ECO201 with a grade 
of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ECO450 Economics and Finance Seminar 

Spring Semester 

Selected readings, discussions, and papers on topics 
that provide a capstone experience, which will em- 



phasize an integration of the courses taken within the 
major. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the major. 
3 credit hours. 

ECO490, EC0491 Economics and Finance 
Internship 

Planned and supervised work experience at selected 
cooperating firms. Internships require students to 
meet periodically with a faculty supervisor, provide 
a written deliverable, and participate in an end-of- 
internship evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior standing 
and departmental approval of each student partici- 
pant's individual program. The program requires ap- 
proximately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. Grad- 
ing will be pass/fail. 

3 credit hours each semester. 

EC0492, EC0493 Economics and Finance 
Internship 

Planned and supervised work experience at selected 
cooperating firms. Internships require students to 
meet periodically with a faculty supervisor, provide 
a written deliverable, and participate in an end-of- 
internship evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior standing 
and departmental approval of each student partici- 
pant's individual program. The program requires 
approximately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. 
Students admitted to the Dual Degree Program must 
also schedule MBA506 with EC0492 and MBA507 
with EC0493 to fulfill the work experience require- 
ment. Grading will be pass/fail. 
3 credit hours each semester. 



EDUCATION 



ED200 Instructional Technology 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Instructional Technology in education is a basic 
course in the design, development, selection, utili- 
zation, management, and evaluation resources for 
enhancing the teaching/learning process through the 
judicious use of technology in the classroom. The 
term "technology" in this course refers to traditional 
media (i.e., print materials, overhead transparencies, 
instructional displays) and to advanced technologies 
(i.e., laserdiscs, CD-ROM, PDAs, digitized audio/ 



video, telecommunications, etc.). Through lectures, 
hands-on practice, skill-building activities, small 
group work sessions, and interdisciplinary projects, 
participants will integrate these technologies into ac- 
tive learning environments, aimed primarily toward 
K-12 students. 

3 credit hours. 

ED221 Introduction to American Education 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Emphasizes the role of the school as a societal set- 



Education 359 



ting, the functions of schools in a changing society, 
community and governmental influences upon edu- 
cation, the school as both producer and product of 
change, and the historical/philosophical influences 
on the American educational institutions. Relates the 
teacher's roles and surveys philosophical influences. 
3 credit hours. 

ED234 Storytelling Practicum 

Fall Semester 

This course will introduce the background of storytell- 
ing and create an awareness of this art form. Discov- 
ering how to find a story to tell, work it. and tell it will 
provide techniques and strategies that can be used in 
all areas of communication. The many personal and 
professional uses for storytelling will be explored, as 
well as a variety of ways in which to present a story. 
In addition to learning how to effectively tell a story, 
students will develop poise, self-confidence, and self- 
esteem. The course is appropriate for Elementary and 
Secondary Education majors as well as others who 
wish to enhance their public speaking skills. 
3 credit hours. 

ED307 Responding to Emergencies 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to give the non-profession- 
al—whether at work, coaching, or at home— the nec- 
essary knowledge to give immediate care to the sick 
or injured. The course also involves basic anatomy 
and physiology and an orientation in safety. Nation- 
ally recognized certification in First Aid. AED, and 
CPR will be awarded upon successful completion of 
the course and the satisfying of the certifying agen- 
cies' requirements. 
3 credit hours. 

ED309 Principles of Athletic Coaching 
Spring Semester 

A course designed to supply students with an ethi- 
cally and educationally sound philosophy under- 
lying the inclusion of competitive athletics in the 
education program. It is designed to provide a back- 
ground of psychological and physiological insights 
to enable the beginning coach to effectively teach 
individual and group motor skills. 
3 credit hours. 

ED311 Prevention and Treatment of Athletic 
Injuries-Level I 
Fall Semester 



This course is designed to provide the student with 
insights and skills necessary to handle basic sport 
injury situations. Course content deals with the pre- 
vention and evaluation of common injuries and the 
basic treatment and management of these injuries. 
3 credit hours. 

ED370 Psychology of Learning/Elementary 
Education 

Fall-Spring Semester 

This course is designed to provide the student who 
majors in Elementary Education or Elementary/ 
Special Education with an understanding of re- 
search-based psychological principles essential for 
effective teaching and learning. Topics will address 
theoretical foundations of the learning process and 
concepts of the developing learner. The influence 
of factors such as student diversity and individual 
differences in the ways students learn, achievement 
motivation, and the impact contextual factors have 
on learning are also discussed in relation to how 
these principles should intentionally guide instruc- 
tion. Prerequisite: PSYIOO and PSY221 . 
3 credit hours. 

ED371 Psychology of Learning/Secondary 
Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to provide students who ma- 
jor in Secondary Education with an understanding of 
research-based psychological principles essential for 
effective teaching and learning. Topics will address 
the theoretical foundations of the learning process 
and concepts of the developing adolescent learner. 
The influence of factors such as student diversity 
and individual differences in the ways students learn, 
achievement motivation, classroom management, 
and the impact contextual factors have on learning 
are also discussed in relation to how these principles 
should intentionally guide instruction. Prerequisite: 
PSYIOO. 

3 credit hours. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Prerequisite: Pre-Professional Educator Status 
(PPES). The following courses may not be 
scheduled until PPES has been attained. 



360 Course Descriptions 



EE300 Teaching Language Arts in 
Elementary School 

Fall-Spring Semester 

Preparation for and practice in teaching commu- 
nication skills in the elementary school. Potential 
elementary teachers are provided the essential tech- 
niques, strategies, and familiarity with a whole lan- 
guage approach to language/literacy acquisition. An 
important segment is teacher awareness and appre- 
ciation of the role of children's literature within the 
curriculum. Prerequisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE301 Foundations of Reading Instruction 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides students with the founda- 
tions for teaching reading in the elementary school. 
Course topics include: early literacy development, 
approaches to reading instruction, systematic in- 
struction vs. whole language philosophy, vocabulary 
development, comprehension instruction, content 
area reading, and instructional adaptations for ethni- 
cally diverse and exceptional learners. This course is 
the foundational course for all other reading courses. 
Prerequisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE302 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Surveys problems in diagnosing and handling of 
pupils' reading difficulties to include appraisal tech- 
niques, procedures, and materials for corrective and 
remedial instruction. Conducting a case study with 
an individual child will constitute a significant por- 
tion of the workload in this course. Prerequisite: 
PPES and EE301. 
3 credit hours. 

EE304 Teaching Elementary Social Studies 
in Elementary School 

Fall-Spring Semester 

Preparation for teaching elementary school social 
studies. Course content deals with recent techniques, 
development in approaches, methods and materials 
for teaching social studies. Emphasis is on the utili- 
zation of children's literature in teaching social stud- 
ies. The course is designed to help potential teach- 
ers implement the national social studies standards. 
Prerequisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 



EE310 Physical Education/Health in the 
Elementary Classroom 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course will provide the elementary classroom 
teacher with the knowledge and skills necessary to 
enable each child to achieve and maintain a physi- 
cally active and healthful life. Course content will 
include stages of growth and development, under- 
standing of movement concepts and skills, teaching 
strategies and techniques, and opportunities to apply 
this knowledge in class projects and activities. Pre- 
requisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE315 Teaching Mathematics in the 
Elementary School 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Preparation for, and practice in, teaching elementary 
school mathematics. Potential teachers are provided 
with the essential strategies that facilitate the devel- 
opment of mathematical concepts in the elementary 
curriculum. The course includes instructional tech- 
niques, assessment, using children's literature and 
cooperative grouping through "hands-on" inquiry, 
process approaches that meet the National Council 
of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards. Pre- 
requisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE316 Teaching Science in the Elementary 
School 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Preparation for, and practice in, teaching elementary 
school science. Emphasis is placed on the inquiry 
approach and the development of concepts. The 
course includes instructional techniques; strategies 
to generate background knowledge, types of ques- 
tions and tasks that facilitate intrinsic motivation, 
learning, and achievement; cooperative learning 
strategies; the use of children's literature in science; 
and assessment strategies. The course is designed to 
help potential teachers implement the national sci- 
ence standards. Prerequisites: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE380 Topics in Children's Literature 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to offer prospective elemen- 
tary classroom teachers an in-depth analysis of the 
best in children's literature, an overview of the qual- 



Education 361 



ities of good literature, and demonstrated methods 
of including literature throughout every subject area. 
Emphasis will be placed on an overview of the eight 
genres of literature, the elements of a good book, 
and the methods and procedures of incorporating lit- 
erature into the curriculum. Prerequisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE390 Seminar in Curriculum 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Designed for elementary teacher candidates. Empha- 
sis will be placed on the most current theories and 
practices relevant to specific disciplines within the 
elementary curriculum. These may include (but are 
not limited to) standards-based education, thematic 
instruction, current issues in reading and/or multiple 
intelligences. Prerequisite: PPES. 
2-3 credit hours, 

EE402 Community and Legal Issues in 
Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course reviews public school structure and or- 
ganization in terms of the teacher's numerous roles 
and relationships. These relationships include par- 
ents and community, and various elements in the 
typical school environment. These include students, 
peers, support staff, and administration. Students are 
familiarized with the legal foundations applicable 
to employment and professional practice within a 
public school setting. The three major functions of a 
teacher— to supervise, to keep safe, and to instruct— 
are examined with focus on the goal of providing 
an enhanced awareness of "preventative law." To be 
taken the academic term prior to the Student Teach- 
ing Semester. 

3 credit hours. 

EE403 Educational Evaluation 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introduction to the principles and 
procedures underlying effective assessment, evalu- 
ation, and measurement of learning. Included will 
be commercial and teacher-constructed instruments, 
statistical treatment and interpretation of test scores, 
and relevant procedures for appraising and report- 
ing student progress. The course will deal with the 
establishment of cooperative assessment processes 
and how they can be fully integrated into every as- 
pect of the curriculum. Assessment and evaluation 



as a decision-making process will also be empha- 
sized. Prerequisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

EE404 Student Teaching 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Under the supervision of college and cooperating 
staff, the student engages in the actual planning, 
conducting, and evaluation of classroom learning 
activities. Focusing upon integration of all aspects 
of the practicum is an integral part of the course. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the Student Teaching 
Semester, successful completion of EE402. $230 fee 
(subject to change). 
10 credit hours. 

EE405 Focused Studies in Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This offering is intended only for Education majors 
initially scheduled for student teaching. Having not 
found satisfaction in the student teaching assign- 
ment, the student is relieved of these duties to pur- 
sue research and activities specifically related to a 
topic or project approved by the department chair. 
The student is required to submit tangible evidence 
of activities and resultant growth for evaluation. 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Student Teaching 
Semester and permission of the departmental chair. 
May be scheduled during the Student Teaching Se- 
mester only. 

10 credit hours. 

EE412 Student Teaching Practicum 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A weekly meeting conducted during the Student 
Teaching Semester. This is required of all student 
teachers and is designed to focus upon the integra- 
tion of all aspects of the student teaching experience. 
Grading is pass/fail only. Prerequisites: Admission 
to the Student Teaching Semester and permission of 
the departmental chair. May be scheduled during the 
Student Teaching Semester only. 
1 credit hour. 

EE413 Selected Topics in Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course focuses on selected critical concerns fac- 
ing teachers in today's classrooms. Among the issues 
addressed are time management and organizational 
strategies specific to student teaching, working with 



362 Course Descriptions 



special need learners in the regular education envi- 
ronment, critical issues related to student teaching, 
the pre-employment process, and initial professional 
practice. Prerequisites: May be scheduled during the 
Student Teaching Semester only. 

1 credit hour. 

EE416 Directed Professional Educational 

Experience 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

For students choosing the Alternate Program. The 
student and supervising instructor create an academ- 
ic and experiential plan of specific study reflective of 
a major interest outside of a public classroom setting. 
A package of content and assignments is designed 
to explore optional educational career themes. Pre- 
requisites: All coursework required for admittance 
to the Student Teaching Semester. $230 fee (subject 
to change). 

2 to 8 credit hours. 

EE430 Professional Development 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed for elementary teacher can- 
didates. Emphasis is placed on the most relevant 
pre-professional issues and concerns facing the 
beginning teacher. These may include, but are not 
limited to, the following: personal philosophy of 
education, cover letter, standard state applications, 
resume, portfolio, interviewing, pre-employment re- 
search, and the job search process. 

3 credit hours. 

EE498, EE499 Independent Study 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu- 
nity for the student who wishes to undertake a well- 
defined research project. While the student conducts 
his work under the guidance of a faculty member 
of his own choosing, the project is carried out in an 
independent manner without regular class meetings. 
Effective independent study is characterized by a re- 
duction in formal instruction and an increase in the 
individual student's responsibility and initiative in 
the learning process. 

1 to 3 credit hours each semester. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Prerequisite: PPES. The following courses 
may not be scheduled until PPES has been 
attained. 

SE310 Student Assistance Seminar 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course will enable pre-service teachers to un- 
derstand how to utilize a school-based, systematic 
approach in dealing with complex student issues 
such as substance abuse and mental health prob- 
lems. Student Assistance Seminar examines the 
etiology of problems in adolescence especially as 
they relate to school failure. Students will under- 
stand the purpose of student assistance programs 
and the value of using a systematic research based 
approach in removing barriers to learning. The 
use of professional behavioral observation and 
reporting will be stressed and the limitations of 
extending assistance consistent with the current 
legal framework will be discussed. Students will 
develop the skills necessary to engage parents and 
students in productive conversations about non- 
academic issues. Teaching methodologies em- 
ployed will include discussion, case study analy- 
sis, and simulations. 
1 credit hour. 

SE350 The Secondary School Experience 

Fall-Spring Semester 

The responsibility of teaching, teacher, learning, and 
learner comes into focus as the educational experienc- 
es of the adolescent are studied. Individual and group 
projects delve into the domain of secondary curricu- 
lum. The development and direction of the American 
secondary school system is investigated through the 
cooperative efforts of student and teacher. Issues and 
problems are researched as to their genesis, growth, 
and influence on today's classroom. Curricular mate- 
rials, guides, projects, and approaches are reviewed 
and then compared to the identified needs of society 
and the individual. Prerequisite: PPES. 
3 credit hours. 

SE351 Teaching Strategies in the Secondary 

Schools 

Fall-Spring Semester 

Students and instructor share in the presentation and 
evaluation of individual mini-lessons. Microteach- 



Education 363 



ing techniques are used with videotaping procedures 
to practice and improve lesson presentation skills. 
Concentrated efforts are targeted on the develop- 
ment of techniques and methods that best enhance 
classroom learning. Discussion and group work 
combine to lend credence to course assignments and 
to give students direct experience with professional 
practices. Prerequisites: PPES. (SE350 recommend- 
ed or permission of the Coordinator of Secondary 
Education). 

3 credit hours. 

SE352 Teaching Social Studies in the 
Secondary School 
Fall Semester 

The focus of this course is to research various social 
studies course curricula, methodological approaches, 
and selected topical themes. Consideration is main- 
streamed toward investigating the various approach- 
es to the social studies and "how" they might best be 
integrated into a classroom of secondary students. 
Prerequisites: PPES, SE350, or permission of Co- 
ordinator of Secondary Education. (SE351 strongly 
recommended.) 

3 credit hours. 

SE353 Teaching Secondary 
Communications/English 
Fall Semester 

This course provides preparation for and practice in 
teaching secondary English. Students prepare and 
present lesson plans for teaching a variety of skills 
and appreciations in the English classroom. Areas 
of concentration include language study (grammar), 
reading, literature, writing, listening, and speaking. 
Prerequisites: PPES, SE350, or permission of the 
Coordinator of Secondary Education. (SE351 rec- 
ommended.) 

3 credit hours. 

SE354 Teaching General Science in the 
Secondary School 

Spring Semester, even-numbered years and 
Summer Semester, odd-numbered years 

Preparation for, and practice in, teaching general sci- 
ence in the secondary school environment. Recent 
technology, development in approaches, methods, 
and appropriate materials for teaching general sci- 
ence are explored. Emphasis is on a laboratory ap- 
proach to teaching science and on laboratory skills 



through laboratory activities. Prerequisites: PPES, 
SE350. or permission by Coordinator of Secondary 
Education and instructor. (SE351 recommended). 
3 credit hours. 

SE355 Teaching Mathematics in the 
Secondary School 

Spring Semester 

Preparation for, and practice in, teaching mathemat- 
ics in the secondary school. Course content deals 
with recent techniques, developments in approaches 
and methods and materials for teaching mathemat- 
ics. Prerequisites: PPES, SE350, or permission 
of Coordinator of Secondary Education. (SE351 
strongly recommended). Co-requisite: MAT355. 
These courses should be scheduled within one year 
of student teaching. 
3 credit hours. 

SE360 Teaching Reading and Writing in the 
Content Areas 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Introduction to strategies and techniques that sec- 
ondary teachers use to help students understand and 
appreciate textual information. Since students at the 
middle/junior-high and high school level frequently 
require guidance as they attempt to learn and act 
upon new information, content area teachers have 
an important role in providing such guidance. Thus, 
this course prepares future secondary teachers with 
a wealth of student strategies to be used before, dur- 
ing, and after reading assignments. Prerequisite: 
PPES. (SE350 strongly recommended or permission 
by Coordinator of Secondary Education.) 
1 credit hour. 

SE402 Community and Legal Issues in 
Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course reviews public school structure and or- 
ganization in terms of the teacher's numerous roles 
and relationships. These relationships include par- 
ents and community, and various elements in the 
typical school environment. These include students, 
peers, support staff, and administration. Students are 
familiarized with the legal foundations applicable 
to employment and professional practice within a 
public school setting. The three major functions of a 
teacher— to supervise, to keep safe, and to instruct— 
are examined with focus on the goal of providing 



364 Course Descriptions 



an enhanced awareness of "preventative law." To be 
taken the academic term prior to the Student Teach- 
ing Semester. 

3 credit hours. 

SE404 Student Teaching 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Under the supervision of college and cooperating 
staff, the student engages in the actual planning, 
conducting, and evaluation of classroom learning 
activities. Focusing upon integration of all aspects 
of the practicum is an integral part of the course. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the Student Teaching 
Semester, successful completion of SE402. $230 fee 
(subject to change). 
10 credit hours. 

SE405 Focused Studies in Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This offering is intended only for Education majors 
initially scheduled for student teaching. Having not 
found satisfaction in the student teaching assign- 
ment, the student is relieved of these duties to pur- 
sue research and activities specifically related to a 
topic or project approved by the department chair. 
The student is required to submit tangible evidence 
of activities and resultant growth for evaluation. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the Student Teaching 
Semester and permission of the departmental chair. 
May be scheduled during the Student Teaching Se- 
mester only. 

10 credit hours. ' 

SE412 Student Teaching Practicum 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A weekly meeting conducted during the Student 
Teaching Semester. This is required of all student 
teachers and is designed to focus upon the integra- 
tion of all aspects of the student teaching experience. 
Grading is pass/fail only. Prerequisites: Admission 
to the Student Teaching Semester and permission of 
the departmental chair. May be scheduled during the 
Student Teaching Semester only. 
1 credit hour. 

SE413 Selected Topics in Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course focuses on selected critical concerns fac- 
ing teachers in today's classrooms. Among the issues 
addressed are time management and organizational 



strategies specific to student teaching, working with 
special need learners in the regular education envi- 
ronment, critical issues related to student teaching, 
the pre-employment process, and initial professional 
practice. Prerequisite: May be scheduled during the 
Student Teaching Semester only. 

1 credit hour. 

SE416 Directed Professional Educational 
Experience 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

For students choosing the Alternate Program. The 
student and supervising instructor create an academ- 
ic and experiential plan of specific study reflective of 
a major interest outside of a public classroom setting. 
A package of content and assignments is designed 
to explore optional educational career themes. Pre- 
requisites: All coursework required for admittance 
to the Student Teaching Semester. $230 fee (subject 
to change). 

2 to 8 credit hours. 

SE398, SE499 Independent Study 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

The Independent Study Program affords an oppor- 
tunity for the student who wishes to undertake a 
well-defined research project. While the student 
conducts his/her work under the guidance of a fac- 
ulty member of his/her own choosing, the project 
is carried out in an independent manner without 
regular class meetings. Effective independent 
study is characterized by a reduction in formal 
instruction and an increase in the individual stu- 
dent's responsibility and initiative in the learning 
process. 

1 to 3 credit hours each semester. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

SPE205 ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorder 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an overview of two neuro- 
logically based developmental disorders. Attention 
Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spec- 
trum Disorders. Symptoms, etiology, developmen- 
tal course, and diagnostic criteria and assessment 
techniques will be examined in students N-12. Em- 
phasis is placed on major treatment approaches re- 
garding how to create and manage the educational 



Education 365 



environment to maximize opportunities for effec- 
tive academic and behavioral interventions regard- 
ing deficits in communication, social competen- 
cies, and behavior. A six-hour field experience is 
required. Prerequisite: PSY227 or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE206 Emotional Support 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Pre-service educators are provided with knowledge 
of the symptoms, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and 
assessment techniques of students N-12 who exhibit 
severe mental, emotional, and behavioral deficits. 
Emphasis is placed on moral and social develop- 
ment, analysis of behavior, implementation of a 
functional behavioral assessment, development of 
individual educational plans (lEPs), and instruction- 
al strategies designed to address the needs of stu- 
dents who are behaviorally challenged, as well as on 
the role of paraprofessionals and parents as partners. 
A nine-hour field experience is required. Prerequi- 
site; PSY227or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE302 Assistive Technology 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides prospective teachers with an 
overview of assistive devices that can be imple- 
mented in classroom settings for individuals N-12 
with communication deficits, visual and hearing 
impairments, physical challenges, and mild learn- 
ing disabilities. Emphasis is placed on evaluating 
the needs of students who are challenged and se- 
lecting the appropriate technology that will bypass 
the disability in the classroom. Students are pro- 
vided with resources on current devices and are 
given opportunities to examine and operate actual 
devices that they will encounter in the classroom. A 
six-hour field experience is required. Prerequisite: 
PSY227 or PSYIOO. 
2 credit hours. 

SPE303 Mental Retardation 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course focuses on identification of types, char- 
acteristics, etiology, and assessment of students 
grades N-12 who are mentally retarded. The course 
includes selected models of instruction, the role of 
paraprofessionals, rights and legal issues, develop- 
ment and psychosocial aspects, as well as family 



considerations. This course has a 10-hour special 
education field experience requirement. Prerequi- 
site: PSY227 or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE333 Assessment/Instructional Design: 
Specific Learning Disabilities 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This is a core course in Special Education. It will 
examine a heterogeneous group of disabilities mani- 
fested by significant difficulties in acquisition and 
use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reason- 
ing, or mathematical abilities due to central ner- 
vous system dysfunction in students N-12. Content 
will focus on (a) the formal diagnostic process, (b) 
the assessment-teaching process using the clinical 
teaching model, (c) development and implementa- 
tion of Individual education plans (lEPs) and goals, 
(d) instructional strategies, and (e) various support 
services, partners, and delivery systems available. A 
10-hour field experience is required. Prerequisites: 
PSY227 or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE338 Assessment and Instructional 
Design: Mild, Moderate, and Severe 
Disabilities 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This core course in Special Education will exam- 
ine methods of informal and formal assessment and 
instructional design for students N-12 who are di- 
agnosed with a range of disabilities. Emphasis will 
be placed on development of Individual Education 
Plans (lEPs) for students with developmental de- 
lays, sensory impairments, orthopedic impairments, 
traumatic brain injury, other health impairments, and 
multiple disabilities. A 10-hour field experience is 
required. Prerequisite: SPE333. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE340 Behavioral Design/Intervention and 
Classroom Management 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed primarily for junior- and 
senior-level students. Several theoretical models of 
behavior management are critically examined with 
a focus on (a) maximizing opportunities for effec- 
tive communication and interaction with students 
who have behavioral challenges, (b) facilitating 
collaborative partnerships with students' families 



366 Course Descriptions 



and the educational team, (c) cultivating a motivat- 
ing and safe psychological and physical classroom 
environment, (d) assessing and analyzing the func- 
tions of behavior by implementing an FBA, (e) de- 
signing an individual behavior support plan and a 
proactive class-wide behavior management plan. A 
semester-long nine-hour field experience is required. 
Prerequisites: PSYIOO or PSY327. (PPES status and 
SPE333 recommended for Education majors.) 
3 credit hours. 

SPE351 Transitions in Special Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Pre-service teachers are provided with skills neces- 
sary to facilitate the many transitions students N-12 
make throughout their school years and continue 
to make through post-secondary options. Specific 
transitions of focus include pre-school to kinder- 
garten; kindergarten to grade one; grade transitions 
through elementary, middle, and high school; and 
transitions to the world of work and/or college. 
This course will examine legal aspects of transi- 
tions, the role of transition coordinators, and the 
availability and services provided by outside agen- 
cies. No field experience is required. Prerequisites: 
PSY227 or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE364 Educational Assessment 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an overview of basic prin- 
ciples of formal and informal assessments 'that are 
commonly encountered by teachers in educational 
settings. The first part of this course focuses on va- 
lidity, reliability, measures of central tendency and 
variation, as well as test development with the goal 
of providing a basis for understanding specific test 
data and materials. The second part of the course ad- 
dresses specific measures of assessment such as the 
Wechsler's Intelligence Scale, Woodcock Johnson, 
Key Math Test, and curriculum-based assessment. 
Prerequisites: PSY227 or PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

SPE404 Student Teaching in Special 
Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Under the supervision of college and cooperating 
staff, the student majoring in the Elementary /Special 
Education Dual Certification Program engages in 



on-site planning, teaching, and evaluating classroom 
learning activities in a special education setting or 
settings. Focus on the integration of all aspects of the 
practicum is an integral part of this course. Prerequi- 
sites: Admission to Student Teaching Semester, suc- 
cessful completion of EE402, EE404, EE4I2, and 
EE413. Co-requisites: SPE412 and SPE451. This 
course is full-time by appointment during the se- 
mester after completion of the Student Teaching 
Semester in Elementary Education. 
10 credit hours. 

SPE405 Focused Studies in Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This offering is intended only for Education majors 
initially scheduled for student teaching. Having not 
found satisfaction in the student teaching assign- 
ment, the student is relieved of these duties to pur- 
sue research and activities specifically related to a 
topic or project approved by the department chair. 
The student is required to submit tangible evidence 
of activities and resultant growth for evaluation. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the Student Teaching 
Semester and permission of the department chair. 
May be scheduled during the Student Teaching Se- 
mester only. 

2 to 10 credit hours. 

SPE412 Student Teaching Practicum in 
Special Education 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

One class period weekly is conducted during the 
second Student Teaching Semester required of all 
student teachers majoring in the Elementary/Special 
Education Dual Certification Program. The course is 
designed to focus upon the integration of all aspects 
of the student teaching experience in special educa- 
tion. Co-requisites: SPE451 and SPE416. 
1 credit hour. 

SPE416 Directed Professional Educational 
Experience 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

For students choosing the Alternate Program. The 
student and supervising instructor create an academ- 
ic and experiential plan of specific study reflective of 
a major interest outside of a public classroom setting. 
A package of content and assignments is designed 
to explore optional educational career themes. Pre- 
requisites: All coursework required for admittance 



Engineering 367 



to the Student Teaching Semester. $230 fee (subject 
to change). 

2 to 10 credit hours. 

SPE451 Analysis and Design of Instruction: 
Senior Seminar 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Students majoring in the Elementary/Special Educa- 
tion Dual Certification Program enroll in this course 
during their second professional semester of student 
teaching ■ The goal is designed to synthesize the rel- 



evant research on instructional design for maximum 
student achievement. Students will learn to identify 
effective teaching principles based upon their critical 
analysis of empirical research. An in-depth review of 
10 areas of research on effective and differentiated 
teaching will facilitate reflective decision-making, 
allowing prospective teachers to bridge the gaps be- 
tween research and practice. Co-requisites: SPE412 
andSPE416. 

1 credit hour. 



ENGINEERING 



EGR100 EPADS I 

Fall Semester 

This course has two concurrent parts. First, stu- 
dents are introduced to engineering design, team 
development, problem-solving, and a team design 
project, which requires the students to create, de- 
sign, and build simple electro-mechanical devices 
that perform specific functions subject to defined 
constraints. Second, students develop engineering 
skills, including how to create solid models (using 
software such as SolidWorks^"^' ). how to program a 
microprocessor-driven application (using softv/are 
such as RoboLab"^^' ), and how to design and build 
simple sensors to control an application and enable 
it to interact with its environment. 

2 credit hours. 

6 laboratory hours. 

EGR102 EPADS II 

Spring Semester 

Students work in teams and undertake a client-ori- 
ented project to learn the design process by creating, 
designing, and building an apparatus. Students are 
introduced to project specification, idea formation, 
conceptual and detailed design, analysis, documenta- 
tion, fabrication, and testing. Students practice written 
and oral communication. Concurrently, students learn 
manufacturing processes, such as welding, brazing, 
turning, milling, and grinding, to fabricate compo- 
nents in the shop. Students also learn to breadboard 
electrical circuits that interface with a microcontroller 
and sensors to control actuators, such as electrical 
motors. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in EGRIOO. 

2 credit hours. 

6 laboratory hours. 



EGR240 Mathematical Methods in 
Engineering 

Spring Semester 

This course covers topics of applied mathematics 
that build upon differential and integral calculus and 
that are particularly relevant to engineering majors. 
These topics include: Complex Numbers. Linear 
Algebra, Vector Calculus, Fourier Series and Trans- 
forms, and Special Functions. Prerequisite: 2.0 or 
higher in MAT 172. 
3 credit hours. 

EGR290 Engineering Career Training 
Preparation 

Spring Semester 

This one-credit-hour seminar prepares students for 
their first co-op work assignment. Activities may in- 
clude industrial field trips to meet with York College 
co-op students who give tours and presentations of 
their engineering experiences. Senior engineering 
students who have finished their three co-op terms 
may be invited to present and discuss their experi- 
ences in a formal panel discussion. Guest speakers 
from industry, including an engineering co-op men- 
tor and human resource manager, may be invited to 
discuss topics related to the real world of engineer- 
ing work. Exercises may include role playing and 
situational ethics. Grading is pass/fail only. 
1 credit hour. 

EGR305 Statistical Design and Process 

Control 

Summer Semester 

This course involves the use of statistical methods 
for improving the design of products and processes. 



368 Course Descriptions 



for determining the capability of processes to meet 
product design requirements, and for controlling 
processes to assure product quality. Topics include: 
random variation, induction and deduction; proba- 
bility and statistics related to sampling distributions; 
hypothesis testing; one-, two-, and three-way analy- 
sis of variance; full and fractional factorial design 
of experiments; Taguchi designs; response surfaces; 
evolutionary operations (EVOP); statistical process 
control; and process capability analysis. Lectures are 
supplemented with statistical experiments and team 
activities that are related to statistical design. 
3 credit hours. 

EGR342 System Modeling and Analysis 
Fall Semester 

This course uses analogies to introduce modeling 
of basic mechanical and electrical systems includ- 
ing static and dynamic equilibrium force analyses, 
vibration, elasticity, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, 
and simple electric circuits. Topics covered include: 
methods of linear approximation; lumped, integral, 
and differential models; free and forced responses of 
first and second-order systems; steady-state frequen- 
cy response and Bode plots; filtering; resonance; 
damping; dynamic stability analysis; and multiple 
degree-of-freedom systems. Prerequisite: 2.0 or 
higher in ECE280. 
3 credit hours. 

EGR392 Automatic Control 
Summer Semester 

This course introduces fundamental principles and 
applications of automatic control of linear, time- 
invariant systems. Topics include: formulation and 
solution of equations of motion, controller design 
using root locus and frequency domain techniques, 
performance, stability, and compensation. Computer 
simulations are emphasized. Concepts in state space 
modeling of systems are introduced. Prerequisite: 
2.0 or higher in EGR342. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lectures hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

EGR442 Applied Control 

Spring Semester 

This course introduces fundamental principles and 
applications of applied control. Analytical tech- 
niques in digital control, such as discrete system 



analysis and sampled data systems, are covered. 
Other topics include: design using transform and 
state-space methods and adaptive control. The labo- 
ratory is dedicated to applications, including the tun- 
ing of proportional, integral, and differential (PID) 
control parameters as often encountered in industrial 
projects. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in EGR392. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

EGR446 Automated Manufacturing Systems 
Summer Semester 

This course introduces the student to the fundamen- 
tal elements of automated systems, e.g., manipula- 
tion, machine vision, and robotics. The students are 
introduced to the kinematics of robots, their basic 
dynamics, and their control. The integration of ro- 
bots with machine vision for navigation and task co- 
ordination is also discussed and various applications 
studied. Communication technology commonly ap- 
plied in automation is introduced. Prerequisite: 2.0 
or higher in EGR392. 
3 credit hours. 

EGR490 Social, Ethical and Professional 
Issues in Engineering 
Summer Semester 

This course examines current social issues, profes- 
sional practices, and ethical considerations relevant 
to engineers. Case studies are used to illustrate the 
potential impact of proper and improper profes- 
sional practices as well as the difficulties involved in 
weighing ethical considerations and making ethical 
decisions. Local, regional, and global issues involv- 
ing engineering and technology are also discussed, 
in particular with respect to the impact of engineer- 
ing and technology on social and economic policy. 
3 credit hours. 

EGR491 Engineering Cooperative Work 
Experience (Co-op I) 
All Semesters 

Co-op is a graduation requirement for all Engineer- 
ing students. The student spends a total of three se- 
mester terms plus interim periods (48 weeks or more) 
employed in an industrial organization or enterprise 
performing engineering-related work. Beginning with 
the summer term after the student's sophomore year, 
he or she alternates work semesters with academic se- 



Engineering 369 



mesters until the spring semester of the senior year. 
Co-op employment is coordinated and monitored by 
the participating faculty member and the industrial 
mentor. Co-op reports are approved and signed by all 
three parties. Prerequisite: EGR290. 
2 credit hours. 

EGR492 Engineering Cooperative Worl< 
Experience (Co-op II) 
All Semesters 

See description for EGR491 . Prerequisite: EGR491 . 
2 credit hours. 

EGR493 Engineering Cooperative Work 
Experience (Co-op III) 

All Semesters 

See description for EGR491 . Prerequisite: EGR492. 

2 credit hours. 

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER 
ENGINEERING 

ECE220 Design and Analysis of Digital Circuits 

Spring Semester 

This course focuses on fundamentals in the analy- 
sis and design of digital circuits. Boolean algebra, 
gate-logic, combinational and sequential gates, and 
related logic networks, such as encoders, multi- 
plexers, registers, counters, timers, and compara- 
tors, are introduced. Synchronous and asynchro- 
nous circuits are studied. Open-collector, tri-state, 
and programmable logic devices are introduced. 
Popular logic families and interfacing issues be- 
tween digital and analog systems are studied. A/D 
and D/A conversion techniques are examined. The 
laboratory focuses on the design, analysis, and 
verification of digital systems. Prerequisite: 2.0 or 
higher in CSIOI. 
4 credit hour. 

3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE235 Computations in Discrete 

Mathematics 

Spring Semester 

This course introduces the student to computational 
techniques and problems associated with the broad 
field of discrete mathematics. Topics, problems, and 
examples will be drawn from the fields of computer 



science, electrical and computer engineering, and 
mathematics. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in CSlOl . 
1 credit hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE260 Fundamentals of Computer 
Engineering 

Spring Semester 

An introduction to the design and operation of digi- 
tal computers, including information representation, 
logic design, integrated circuits, register transfer 
description, basic computer organization and ma- 
chine-level programming. The relationship between 
software and hardware is stressed. Topics include: 
fundamentals of computer architecture, computer 
arithmetic and digital logic, memory system organi- 
zation and architecture, interfacing and communica- 
tion, device subsystems, machine level representa- 
tion of data, assembly level machine organization, 
functional organization, multiprocessing, and alter- 
native architectures. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in 
bothCS201,ECE220. 

4 credit hours. 
3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE270 Waves and Optics 
Spring Semester 

This course introduces fundamental knowledge in 
the physics of waves and its contrast to the phys- 
ics of particles. Topics include: free, forced and 
damped oscillation; transverse and longitudinal 
waves; standing and traveling waves; superposi- 
tion and interference; reflection and images; and 
diffraction and refraction. Particular phenomena 
related to sound waves, electromagnetic waves, 
photons and matter waves, and quantum mechani- 
cal waves are also discussed. Prerequisite: 2.0 or 
higher in PHY260. 
3 credit hours. 

ECE280 Fundamentals of Electrical 
Engineering 

Spring Semester 

This course covers topics in AC and DC linear cir- 
cuit analysis including Kirchhoff's Laws, voltage 
and current division, nodal and mesh analyses, su- 
perposition, equivalent circuits and power, and the 
role of circuit components such as dependent and 
independent sources, operational amplifiers, resis- 



370 Course Descriptions 



tors, capacitors, and inductors. Steady-state AC cir- 
cuit topics such as phasors. impedance, frequency 
response, filtering, damping, resonance, and power 
are covered. The transient responses of 1 st- and 2nd- 
order systems are examined. Magnetic circuits are 
introduced. Applications of diodes and transistors, 
as switches, are discussed. Related experiments are 
integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite: 2.0 or 
higher in PHY260. 

4 credit hours. 

3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE310 Design and Analysis of Analog 

Circuits 

Fall Semester 

This course focuses on fundamentals of the analysis 
and design of analog circuits. Diodes and transistors, 
including LEDs, BJTs, FETs, and other related cir- 
cuit technologies, and their equivalent circuits and 
frequency-dependent impedance characteristics are 
studied thoroughly. Their roles in switching, isola- 
tion, amplification, and other signal processing cir- 
cuits are examined in detail. Operational amplifiers 
and related topics such as feedback, stability, gain- 
bandwidth product, compensation, active filters, 
and oscillators are studied. Fourier's Theorem, high 
frequency amplifiers, and modulation/demodulation 
are also studied. Noise reduction techniques are in- 
troduced as appropriate. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher 
in ECE280. 

4 credit hours. 
3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE332 Introduction to Signal Processing 

Fall Semester 

This course introduces system-level analysis tools 
for analyzing system performance based on the 
continuous and discrete Fourier transform. Focus- 
ing primarily on digital systems, the course covers 
analog-digital conversion, digital systems, the z- 
transform, discrete Fourier transform, as well as fil- 
ter design and analysis. The laboratory component is 
application-focused where a Digital Signal Process- 
ing (DSP) chip is used to implement signal process- 
ing solutions to real-world problems. Prerequisite: 
2.0 or higher in ECE280. 

4 credit hours. 
3 lecture hours. 



3 laboratory hours. 

ECE340 Random Signals 
Summer Semester 

This course introduces the student to probability and 
statistics and applies these concepts to the design 
and analysis of engineering systems, which inher- 
ently have noise (random components to their sig- 
nals). Topics include the axioms of probability, func- 
tions of one and two random variables, moments 
and conditional statistics, correlation and autocor- 
relation functions, sequences of random variables, 
and commonly encountered probability distribution/ 
density functions. Applications are primarily fo- 
cused on Gaussian and Markov processes, matched 
filters, Wiener filters, mean square estimation, and 
parameter estimation. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in 
ECE332. 

3 credit hours. 

ECE350 Electromagnetic Fields 

Summer Semester 

This course introduces Maxwell's equations and 
their applications to engineering problems. Top- 
ics covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, 
magnetic fields and matter, induction, and electro- 
magnetic waves. The reflection, transmission, and 
propagation of waves are studied. Applications to 
waveguides, transmission lines, radiation, and an- 
tennas are introduced as time permits. Prerequisites: 
2.0 or higher in both ECE270, EGR240. 
3 credit hours. 

ECE360 Power Systems 
Spring Semester 

This course covers transmission line parameter esti- 
mation, power flow in networks, distributed systems, 
load, and power quality. Students study synchronous 
generators and transformers in power systems. The 
course also covers voltage regulation, transient and 
dynamic stability in power systems. Students em- 
ploy simulation tools such as MATLAB/Simulink, 
PSCAD-EMTDC, and PowerWorld to visualize re- 
lated problems. Finally, this course covers energy 
sources such as hydro power, fossil-fuel based pow- 
er plant, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and their 
consequences for our society. Prerequisites: 2.0 or 
higher in both ECE280 and EGR240. 
3 credit hours. 



Engineering 371 



ECE370 Microprocessor System Design 
Summer Semester 

This course discusses more advanced concepts in mi- 
croprocessor architecture, programming, and interfac- 
ing. Speculative and out-of-order design techniques and 
theory are presented, as are concepts of locality, data 
transfer, and communication. A low-level program- 
ming language is introduced as well as high- and low- 
level programming tasks. Interfacing issues between 
power circuits and microprocessors are introduced as 
well as techniques for data conversion. Prerequisites: 
2.0 or higher in both ECE220 and ECE260. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 



ECE380 Communication Networks 
Summer Semester 

This course introduces the fundamental concepts 
of analog and digital communication networks and 
examines applications associated with optical and 
wireless communications. Using an information 
theory approach, computer network interconnec- 
tions are analyzed in terms of efficiency and ac- 
curacy. Topics include: communication network 
architecture; protocols, flow control, and routing: lo- 
cal and wide area networks; voice and data commu- 
nications; data security and integrity; performance 
evaluation; source and channel coding; compression 
and decompression technology. Prerequisite: 2.0 or 
higher in ECE332. 
3 credit hours. 

ECE400 Capstone Design I 

Summer Semester 

Engineering seniors, operating in design teams, 
apply principles of the design process to create a 
product or process to meet the needs of a custom- 
er. Projects may originate in industry, as a contest 
sponsored by a professional society, or in other 
venues. The design team, with the guidance of a 
faculty advisor, must plan, direct, conduct, and ef- 
fectively communicate the results of the design ef- 
fort through a professional engineering report and 
oral presentation. The design project will include 
material within and beyond the curriculum as well 
as technical and non-technical considerations. De- 
sign projects often result in a deliverable proto- 
type. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in all of ECE260, 



ECE310,ECE332. 
3 credit hours. 
1 lecture hour. 
6 laboratory hours. 

ECE402 Capstone Design II 

Spring Semester 

This course is a continuation of ECE400. Prerequi- 
site: 2.0 or higher in ECE400. 
3 credit hours. 

1 lecture hour. 

6 laboratory hours. 

ECE410 Power Electronics 

Summer Semester 

Power electronics is the application of electronic 
circuits to energy conversion. This course discuss- 
es modeling, design, analysis, and control of DC/ 
DC converters, AC/DC rectifiers, DC/AC inverters, 
AC/AC cycloconverters, and switch-mode power 
supplies. Power electronics applications in motor 
drives, uninterrupted power supplies, and power 
systems are also discussed. Other applications in- 
clude high-efficiency energy conversion, process 
control and automation, vehicular power systems, 
and renewable energy systems. Software and hard- 
ware are used in the lab to design and analyze pow- 
er electronics circuits in real time. Prerequisite: 2.0 
or higher in ECE310. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE420 Embedded System Design 

Spring Semester 

This course emphasizes methods for designing real- 
time software and choosing hardware for embedded 
computers. Relevant theory and background from 
real-time systems and control engineering will be cov- 
ered in the lectures, including event-based and clock- 
based sampling, switching control, and intenupt and 
scheduling techniques. Basic microcontroller, sensor, 
and actuator technologies will be reviewed. In the 
laboratory, students use tools for simulation and au- 
tomatic code generation to design and build a safe, 
reliable, and robust embedded system. Prerequisite: 
2.0 or higher in both CS420 and ECE370. 
3 credit hours. 



372 Course Descriptions 



ECE430 Communication Systems 
Spring Semester 

This course explores the analysis and design of 
comnuinication systems using noisy communica- 
tion channels. Topics include characterization of the 
channel, analysis of noise and its effect on informa- 
tion transmission, pulse shaping, sampling, modu- 
lation and mixing. Applications include analysis of 
bit error rate for different modulations. Phase Shift 
Keying. Frequency Shift Keying, and multiplexed 
systems as they are used in modern communication 
systems. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in both ECE340 
and ECE380. 

3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ECE450 Principles of VLSI 

Summer Semester 

This course discusses the theory and design of digi- 
tal systems at the transistor level. Beginning with 
the characteristics of the static CMOS inverter, this 
course explores alternative design techniques such 
as dynamic logic and NMOS design. Having estab- 
lished a basis for discussion, the topics of circuit de- 
lay and power consumption are introduced, with an 
emphasis on the problems facing modern VLSI de- 
signers, and thus the entire semiconductor industry. 
Finally, the course discusses the relative importance 
of VLSI techniques in larger scale designs, including 
the architectural impact of the underlying circuits. 
Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in ECE220. 
3 credit hours. 

ECE454 From Verilog to Verification: 
Modern Computer-Aided Design 

Summer Semester 

This course is an introduction to modern computer- 
aided design ("CAD") of digital systems. The topics 
covered in this course are a combination of three ar- 
eas: (1) optimization algorithms. (2) digital design. 
and (3) .software tools and applications. It is suitable 
for students with a range of interests: from those 
more interested in applied theory and algorithms to 
those more interested in digital design. The course 
.systematically covers some of the major automated 
steps used in modern CAD tools, starting from a 
user's high-level architectural specification for an 
entire digital system, down to the optimized creation 



of low-level hardware. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in 
ECE370. 

3 credit hours. 

ECE470, 472, 474, 476, 478 Special Topics in 
Electrical Engineering 

These courses allow for upper-division elective 
courses to be offered on selected topics of interest or 
need to the students. These courses are normally re- 
stricted to upper-level Engineering students and are 
offered when possible based upon the availability of 
instructors and other necessary resources. 
3 credit hours. 

ECE480 Independent Study 

This course enables a student to cany out research 
or in-depth study in a specialized area of electrical or 
computer engineering. The student carries out work 
under the guidance of a selected faculty member. 
Regular class meetings may or may not occur as part 
of this work. Effective independent study is character- 
ized by a reduction in formal instruction by faculty 
and an increase in student initiative and responsibility 
in the learning process. Prerequisite: Must have com- 
pleted 60 credits and minimum 2.5 GPA. 
3-6 credit hours. 

ECE482 Independent Study 

See description for ECE480. 
3 credit hours. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ME250 Statics 

Fall and Summer Semesters 

The course emphasizes the proper utilization of vec- 
tor algebra and free body diagrams to solve problems 
in engineering statics. Vectors are used to describe 
the action of forces and moments acting on particles 
(point masses) and rigid bodies, v/hich are fixed in 
space or undergoing uniform motion. The course be- 
gins with a description of how the topic of Statics fits 
into the broad picture of the engineering curriculum, 
and more particularly, the area known as engineer- 
ing mechanics. The course then moves into six ma- 
jor areas of study: (1 ) vector algebra of forces and 
moments, (2) free body diagrams and equilibria of 
particles and rigid bodies, (3) centroids and centers 
of gravity, (4) internal forces in trusses and frames, 



Engineering 373 



(5) friction and applications to machines, and (6) 
moments of inertia. The course may also include a 
team project involving the design, build and test (to 
failure) of a load-supporting structure subject to a 
given set of design constraints. Prerequisites: 2.0 or 
higher in both MAT 172 and PHY 160. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME252 Dynamics and Vibration 

Spring Semester 

The course emphasizes the proper utilization of vec- 
tor algebra and free body diagrams to solve prob- 
lems in engineering dynamics. Vectors are used to 
describe the action of forces and moments acting 
on particles (point masses) and rigid bodies and to 
determine their resulting motion. The course begins 
with a description of how the topic of Dynamics 
and Vibration fits into the broad picture of the engi- 
neering curriculum, and more particularly, the area 
known as engineering mechanics. The course then 
moves into five major areas of study: (1) dynamics 
of a particle, (2) dynamics of particle systems, (3) 
planar kinematics of rigid bodies, (4) planar kinetics 
of rigid bodies, and (5) vibrations of a particle. The 
course includes laboratory work and use of comput- 
er software to model dynamic systems. The course 
may also include building and testing a dynamical 
system, the operation of which must meet a set of 
desired specifications. A written project report is re- 
quired and evaluated. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in 
both ME250 and MAT272. 

4 credit hours. 
3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME260 Materials Science 
Fall Semester 

This course investigates the relationships that exist 
between the microstructure (atomic arrangements, 
crystal structure, defect distribution, phase compo- 
sition) of engineering materials and their physical 
(mechanical, electrical, optical) properties. Each 
class of materials— metals, ceramics, semiconduc- 
tors, polymers — is discussed in this context. Topics 
include atomic structure and packing, crystallogra- 
phy, defects and dislocations, phase equilibria and 
the kinetics of solid-state reactions, alloys, ceramics 



and glasses, polymers, composites, corrosion, and 
the selection of engineering materials for specific ap- 
plications. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in CHM134. 
Corequisite: ME261. 
3 credit hours. 

ME261 Materials Science Laboratory 
Fall Semester 

This is a laboratory course that accompanies Ma- 
terials Science (ME260). This course includes ex- 
periments in brittle/ductile fracture, creep, phase 
diagrams, metallography, Weibull distributions, and 
corrosion. Corequisite: ME260. 

1 credit hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME264 Strength of Materials 
Spring Semester 

Students in Strength of Materials learn to calculate 
the stresses and deformations in beams, shafts, and 
other mechanical components subjected to various 
loads. We begin with the concepts of loads, displace- 
ments, stresses, strains, and deformations in solids. 
From there, topics of study include the laws of elas- 
ticity, properties of engineering materials, analysis 
and design of bar-type members subject to axial 
loading, torsion, bending, shear, and combined load- 
ing, the principle of superposition, pressure vessels, 
Mohr's circle, and deflection in beams. Prerequisite: 
2.0 or higher in ME250. 
3 credit hours. 

ME265 Materials and Solids Laboratory 

Spring Semester 

Students in the Materials and Solids Laboratory con- 
duct experiments demonstrating the mechanical be- 
havior of engineering materials. Experiments may 
emphasize statistical experiment design, fundamental 
concepts in strength of materials, the use of instrumen- 
tation such as strain gauges, LVDTs, or accelerom- 
eters, or other topics. Communication skills including 
laboratory report writing and/or oral presentations are 
emphasized in this class. Corequisite: ME264. 

1 credit hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME320 Thermodynamics 

Spring Semester 

This course has two primary objectives. The first 
is to demonstrate how solids, liquids, and gases are 



374 Course Descriptions 



characterized in engineering processes. The sec- 
ond is to develop and apply the fundamental laws 
that govern engineering processes involving energy 
transfer, heat, and work. The course begins by ex- 
amining the properties needed to describe solids, 
liquids, and gases. Next, the concepts of work, heat 
transfer, and energy are introduced. These concepts 
then lead to the development of the fundamental 
laws used for analysis of thermodynamic systems 
including conservation of mass, energy, and entropy. 
The course concludes by applying these fundamen- 
tal laws to study several important thermodynamic 
devices including power plants, internal combustion 
engines, air conditioning/refrigeration systems, and 
heat pumps. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in MAT 172. 

4 credit hours. 

3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME351 Instrumentation and Microprocessor 
Laboratory 

Fall Semester 

This laboratory provides students with training and 
hands-on exposure to electrical and electro-mechan- 
ical devices including various sensors, actuators, and 
instrumentation used in electrical and mechanical 
applications. The use of microprocessors to interface 
with and control these devices will be covered. More 
advanced electrical components will be covered in- 
cluding diodes, operational amplifiers, and transis- 
tors. The course will consist of weekly laboratory 
experiments along with one or more design projects. 
Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in ECE280. 

1 credit hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME360 Fluid Mechanics 
Summer Semester 

This course serves as an introduction to fluid me- 
chanics. In previous courses the basic laws for solids 
have been developed and implemented. The intent of 
this course is to formulate and apply analogous laws 
for fluids. The initial portion of the class focuses on 
defining a fluid and its properties. This is followed 
by an analysis of fluids at rest (hydrostatics) and the 
forces they impart on mechanical objects such as 
dams. The final portion of the class covers fluids in 
motion. A variety of analysis techniques are covered. 
These methods include control volume analysis, dif- 
ferential analysis, and dimensional analysis. Once 



developed, these analysis techniques are used to in- 
vestigate a range of fluid dynamics problems such 
as the flow within piping systems, external aerody- 
namic drag forces, and the selection, operation, and 
performance of pumps. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher 
in MAT272, ME250, ME320. 
3 credit hours. 

ME361 Thermo/Fluids Experiments 

Summer Semester 

The main intent of this course is to supplement and 
enhance the material taught in Thermodynamics 
(ME320) and Fluid Mechanics (ME360) via hands- 
on laboratory experiments. Additionally, this course 
is designed to (1) provide experience with the setup, 
calibration, and execution of experiments; (2) dem- 
onstrate the important aspects of data analysis and 
evaluation; and (3) give experience designing and 
conducting experiments. The course is split into two 
parts. In the first part students conduct a series of 
experiments designed to demonstrate thermo-fluid 
principles. A wide range of state-of-the-art labora- 
tory facilities are available for these experiments. 
In the second part, students, working in teams, are 
required to design, construct, and execute an experi- 
ment of their own. Formal laboratory reports are re- 
quired and technical writing is emphasized. Coreq- 
uisite: ME360. 
1 credit hour. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME380 Machine Design 
Summer Semester 

Students in Machine Design investigate theories of 
failure of machine components, and thus learn to 
analyze and design components to predict and avoid 
failure. Students will investigate static loading, fa- 
tigue loading, surface loading, and their associated 
modes of failure. Specific component types, such 
as fasteners, springs, bearings, gears, brakes, and 
shafts will be covered. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in 
ME252 and ME264. 

4 credit hours. 
3 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours 

ME400 Capstone Design I 

Summer Semester 

Engineering students, operating in design teams, 
apply principles of the design process to create a 



Engineering 375 



product or process to meet the needs of a customer. 
Projects may originate from industry, as a contest 
sponsored by a professional society, or other ven- 
ues. The design team, with the guidance of a faculty 
advisor, must plan, direct, conduct, and effectively 
communicate the results of the design effort through 
a professional engineering report and/or presenta- 
tion. The design project will include material within 
and beyond the curriculum as well as technical and 
non-technical considerations. Design projects often 
result in a deliverable prototype. Prerequisites: 2.0 
or higher in EGR342, ME351. ME360. Corequi- 
sites: ME260 and ME380. 

3 credit hours. 

1 lecture hour. 

6 laboratory hours. 

ME402 Capstone Design II 

Spring Semester 

This course is a continuation of ME400. Prerequi- 
site: 2.0 or higher in ME400. 

3 credit hours. 
1 lecture hour. 

6 laboratory hours. 

ME410 Heat Transfer 
Spring Semester 

This course examines the fundamental modes by 
which heat is transferred, namely conduction, con- 
vection, and radiation. The theory behind each of 
these heat transfer modes is presented and then 
applied to the design and analysis of practical en- 
gineering problems and devices. Exposure is pro- 
vided to open-ended problem solving using analyti- 
cal, empirical, and computational solution methods. 
Mathematical treatment of partial differential equa- 
tions, including both analytical and computational 
solutions, is covered. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in 
EGR240,ME360. 

4 Credit hours. (Note: Credit change from 3 
to 4 takes effect in Spring 2011) 

ME411 Thermal System Design 
Spring Semester 

The primary objective of this course is to provide 
design experience in problems involving thermal 
systems. In this course students, working in groups, 
apply the principles developed in thermodynamics, 
fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to the solution 
of open-ended design problems. Deliverables may 



include periodic design reports, formal design re- 
views, and design verification through prototyping. 
Corequisite: ME410. 

2 credit hours. 

6 laboratory hours. 

ME420 Advanced Thermodynamics 

In this course the fundamental laws developed in 
ME320 (Thennodynamics) will be used to study, an- 
alyze, and design practical engineering devices. The 
course will focus primarily on power plants, heating 
and air conditioning systems, and internal combus- 
tion engines. To support analysis of these devices, 
new topics in the areas of combustion, air- water va- 
por mixtures, and advanced engineering cycles will 
be introduced. If time permits, an introduction to the 
behavior of substances at high velocities (near or 
above the speed of sound) will also be coverered. 
Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in ME320. 

3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME422 Robotics 

The field of robotics is concerned with the art and 
science of designing electromechanical systems to 
assist or substitute for human endeavor. Typically, a 
robot has four fundamental capabilities: manipula- 
tion, locomotion, perception, and intelligence. This 
course touches on all four of these areas. Topics in- 
clude spatial transformations, inverse kinematics, 
differential motions, dynamic force analysis, trajec- 
tory generation, actuation, sensing, machine vision, 
and fuzzy logic. Prerequisites: 2.0 or higher in both 
ME252 and ME340. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME440 Mechanics of Machinery 

In this course students learn to design machinery to 
produce specific mechanical motions, velocities, and 
other operations, through the study of kinematics. 
Specific topics in kinematics include linkage synthe- 
sis, position, velocity and acceleration analysis, and 
cam design. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in ME252. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 



376 Course Descriptions 



ME450 Finite Element Analysis 

The finite element method is a numerical proce- 
dure for solving problems in continuum mechan- 
ics with an accuracy acceptable to engineers. 
Problems in stress analysis, heat transfer, fluid 
flow, electric fields, and other areas can be solved 
by finite element analysis. This course emphasizes 
stress analysis and structural mechanics although 
problems from other fields mentioned above may 
be treated throughout the course. Topics include 
one- and two-dimensional finite elements, beam 
and frame finite elements, variational principles, 
the Galerkin approximation, and partial differen- 
tiation equations. Selected topics in finite element 
analysis including initial value problems, eigen- 
value problems, three-dimensional finite elements, 
and element continuity will be treated. Prerequi- 
site: 2.0 or higher in both ME264 and EGR240. 
3 credit hours. 

ME452 Advanced Dynamics and Vibration 

This course considers advanced topics in dynam- 
ics and vibration. Topics include three-dimensional 
dynamics, Lagrange's equations, exact and approxi- 
mate numerical methods applied to multiple-degree- 
of-freedom systems, continuous systems, modal 
analysis, and random and nonlinear vibrations. Pre- 
requisite: 2.0 or higher in ME252. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME464 Advanced Mechanics of Materials 

This course treats the theory of elasticity with appli- 



cations. Topics include theories of stress and strain, 
failure criteria, plane theory of elasticity, application 
of energy methods, curved beams and flat plates, 
stress concentration and contact stresses. The course 
concludes with an introduction to finite element 
methods. Prerequisite: 2.0 or higher in ME264. 
3 credit hours. 

2 lecture hours. 

3 laboratory hours. 

ME470, 472, 474, 476, 478 Special Topics in 
Mechanical Engineering 

The subject matter of special topics courses depends 
upon the needs and/or interests of a minimum number 
of students. These courses are normally restricted to 
upper-level Engineering majors and offered when staff 
interests and availability make it practical to do so. 
3 credit hours. 

ME480 Independent Study 

This course enables a student to carry out research 
or in-depth study in a specialized area of mechani- 
cal engineering. While the student conducts his/her 
work under the guidance of a faculty member whom 
he/she chooses, there may or may not be regular class 
meetings. Effective independent study is character- 
ized by a reduction in formal instruction by faculty 
and an increase in student initiative and responsibil- 
ity or his/her own process of learning. 
3-6 credit hours. 

ME482 Independent Study 

See description for ME480. 
3 credit hours. 



ENTREPRENEURSHIP 



ENT150 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is structured to provide an overview of 
entrepreneurial activities relevant to both start-up 
companies and existing business expansions. It is 
applicable to students in all academic disciplines 
interested in starting or owning a business, while 
maintaining relevance for existing business own- 
ers looking to gain an edge. The course details the 
fundamental principles and processes of entrepre- 
neurship. It will focus on entrepreneurs, entrepre- 
neurial thinking, idea generation, market evalu- 



ation, financing options, business essentials, the 
execution phase, growth strategies, and exit plan 
development. 

3 credit hours. 

ENT220 The Entrepreneurial Marketplace 

Spring Semester 

This course focuses on two critical issues for entre- 
preneurs: the evaluation of market potential during 
the concept development and business plan stage, 
and the challenges of growing sales of high-poten- 
tial ventures. Topics include the basics of market 



Entrepreneurship 377 



analysis, researching markets and market segments, 
translating assumptions on buyer's need into prod- 
uct recognition and acceptance curves, the impact of 
product life cycles, product/service validation, and 
entrepreneurial pricing and advertising. Prerequi- 
site: ENT150 and MKT 100, both with a grade of 2.0 
or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

ENT260 Entrepreneurship and Small 
Business Management 

Spring Semester 

This course is designed to review and analyze the 
role of entrepreneurial management in today's mar- 
ketplace. The course will focus on the major tradi- 
tional and nontraditional theories that have been de- 
veloped in this field. This course will also examine 
unique challenges and problems that entrepreneurs 
face in managing their businesses in today's com- 
petitive marketplace. Topics such as leadership, 
funding sources, capital investment, networking, 
and diversity will be discussed. Case analysis, expe- 
riential exercises, and readings will supplement the 
coursework. Prerequisite: ENT150 and MGT150. 
both with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT280 Gender and Minority Issues in 

Entrepreneurship 

Fall Semester 

This course is designed to review and analyze the 
role of women and minority entrepreneurs in today's 
marketplace. It focuses on the major traditional and 
nontraditional theories that have been developed 
in this field. This course will also examine unique 
challenges and problems that women and minority 
entrepreneurs face. Topics such as leadership, fund- 
ing sources, human capital, networking, teamwork, 
diversity, and venture capital will be discussed. Case 
analysis, experiential exercises, and readings will 
supplement the coursework. Prerequisite: ENT150 
with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT320 Introduction to Franchising 

Spring Semester 

This course is designed to review and analyze the 
role of franchising in today's marketplace. The 
course will focus on the major traditional and 
non-traditional theories that have been developed 



in this field. This course will also examine unique 
challenges and problems that franchisers face in 
today's competitive marketplace. Topics such as 
acquiring a franchise, leasing options, funding 
sources, capital investment, leadership, network- 
ing, and diversity will be discussed. Case analy- 
sis, experiential exercises, and readings will sup- 
plement the coursework. Prerequisite: ENT150, 
ENT220, and ENT260 with a grade of 2.0 or 
higher in each course. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT340 Legal and Ethical Aspects of 

Entrepreneurship 

Fall Semester 

This course assumes that all students have an under- 
standing of basic concepts related to the U.S legal 
system as well as policymaking and regulation at the 
federal, state, and local levels of government. This 
course examines the legal issues that every entrepre- 
neur should understand, from early start-up through 
potential exit. The course emphasizes an understand- 
ing of contracts (both supplier and customer), intel- 
lectual property rights, buy-sell agreements, employ- 
ment law, partner agreements, joint- ventures, and 
limited liability companies. In addition, this course 
will explore the philosophy and role of ethics as it is 
applied to entrepreneurial operations. Prerequisite: 
ENT220, ENT260, and BUS345 with a grade of 2.0 
or higher in each course. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT360 Financing Entrepreneurial Ventures 
Fall Semester 

This course emphasizes how entrepreneurs ex- 
plore and meet the requirements of various fund- 
ing sources from original idea through ramp-up 
to exit. These funding sources include commer- 
cial banks, angel investment, venture capital com- 
panies, private placement consultants, and state/ 
federal grants. Entrepreneurial financing can be 
viewed in terms of a life cycle. The course assists 
the entrepreneur-student with understanding the 
process of procuring financing and analyzing the 
high-growth business in terms of matching poten- 
tial with reward. Prerequisite: ENT220, ENT260, 
ACC220, ACC225, QBA260, ECO200, ECO201, 
and FIN300 with grade of 2.0 or higher in each 
course. 

3 credit hours. 



378 Course Descriptions 



IBS410 International Entrepreneurship 
(formerly ENT410) 
Fall Semester 

The course will emphasize the cultural, technological, 
financial, and legal issues associated with internation- 
al business opportunities. Students will gain valuable 
insight into the application of management, finance, 
marketing, and accounting techniques to entrepre- 
neurial opportunities in this global context. Using 
primarily a case-study approach to the topic, students 
will learn how actual entrepreneurs attack important 
issues as they launch and build their high-growth busi- 
nesses. Prerequisite: ECO200. ECO201 . ENT340, and 
ENT360 with a grade of 2.0 in each course. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT450 Small Business Consulting 
Fall Semester 

To develop their entrepreneurial skills, students 
will be required to assist small business owners in 
diagnosing and solving business problems. Student 
groups will work with local small business owners 
to assist them in solving these issues in a variety of 
areas ranging from, but not limited to, marketing, 
financial analyses, product line development, break- 
even analysis, acquiring financing, and strategic 
planning. Prerequisite: ENT340 and ENT360 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher in each course. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT470, ENT472, ENT474 Seminar in 
Entrepreneurship 

These courses provide students with the opportunity 
to study selected themes and issues in entrepreneur- 
ship, such as creativity and innovation and corporate 
entrepreneurship. Specific topics may be suggested 
by faculty members of students. Students who are 
not entrepreneurship majors or minors must have 
permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Comple- 
tion of ENTl 50. ENT220. and ENT260 with a grade 
of 2.0 or higher or permission of the instructor. 
3 credit hours. 

ENT490, ENT491 Entrepreneurship 
Internship I and II 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This cour.se is a planned and supervised work expe- 
rience at selected cooperating firms. Supplementary 
training, conferences, reports, and appraisals may be 
required. Internships require students to meet periodi- 



cally with a faculty supervisor, provide a written de- 
liverable, and participate in an end-of-intemship eval- 
uation. Prerequisite: Junior standing and departmental 
approval of each student participant's individual pro- 
gram. The program requires approximately 10 hours 
per week for 12 weeks. Grading will be pass/fail. 
3 credit hours each semester. 

ENT492, ENT493 Entrepreneurship 
Internship I and II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is a planned and supervised work expe- 
rience at selected cooperating firms. Supplementary 
training, conferences, reports, and appraisals may be 
required. Internships require students to meet peri- 
odically with a faculty supervisor, provide a written 
deliverable, and participate in an end-of-internship 
evaluation. The program requires approximately 10 
hours per week for at least 12 weeks. Grading will 
be pass/fail. Students admitted to the Dual Degree 
Program must also schedule MBA506 with ENT492 
and MBA507 with ENT493 to fulfill the work ex- 
perience requirement. Prerequisite: Junior standing 
and departmental approval of each student partici- 
pant's individual program. 

3 credit hours each semester. 

EI\IT495 Business Plan Writing 
Spring Semester (beginning 2011) 

This course provides a dynamic, practical, hands-on 
approach that encourages students to immerse them- 
selves in the vision, research, and planning aspects of 
a new business venture. It is designed to ( 1 ) integrate 
business learning that has occurred across the course 
of the students' undergraduate experience; (2) teach 
students how to research, develop, and write detailed 
business plans that can be used to create successful 
businesses; and (3) provide students with exposure 
to relevant, contemporary business topics through 
periodic presentations by local business profession- 
als. Students enrolled in this course will be required 
to take a comprehensive examination in business. 
Prerequisite: ENT340 and ENT360 each a grade of 
2.0 or higher in each course. 
3 credit hours. 



Film 379 



FILM 

FLM216 Introduction to Film 

This course is an introduction to film as a commu- 
nicative and artistic medium, with attention to its 
technological, industrial, social, and aesthetic di- 
mensions. Students will view a wide range of films, 
including early as well as recent American and for- 
eign films, and learn about the various techniques 
used to express meaning in cinema, as well as the 
major critical approaches that can be used to make 
sense of films. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

FLM220 Film History 

Spring Semester 

This course introduces students to the history of film 
as a medium from its beginnings in the late 19th 
century to the present day and explores the complex 
relationship between film and history, with attention 
to the ways in which history has shaped film and film 
has shaped history. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

FLM260-69 Special Topics in Film Genre 

This course examines the way in which films are rou- 
tinely produced, marketed, consumed, and classified 
according to genre to established categories of cin- 
ema delineated by certain general patterns of form 
and content, such as the Western, the horror film, the 
musical, and so on. It may be organized as a broad 
survey of different film genres or as a more focused 
and in-depth exploration of a single film genre. This 
course may be repeated for different topics. 
3 credit hours. 

FLM280-89 Special Topics in Film Directors 

This course explores the theory that film directors, 
by virtue of the central role they play in guiding the 
collaborative project of filmmaking, can be consid- 
ered the authors of films. It may be organized as a fo- 
cused and in-depth examination of a single director 
who exhibits a distinctive style and coherent themat- 
ic vision in his or her films, or as a broad survey of 
a group of directors who share the same stylistic or 
thematic concerns and/or the same gender, ethnicity, 
or sexual orientation. This course may be repeated 
for different topics. 
3 credit hours. 



FLM320-29 Special Topics in Film Period 

This course undertakes an extended and in-depth ex- 
amination of a specific period in film history, v/ith 
attention to its unique technological, industrial, so- 
cial, and aesthetic dimensions. It may be organized 
around the exploration of a particular decade (e.g.. 
the 1960s), movement (e.g., postwar Italian Neore- 
alism), or era (e.g., the silent era) important to the 
history of cinema. This course may be repeated for 
different topics. Prerequisite: WRT102. 
3 credit hours. 

FLM340-49 Special Topics in National 
Cinemas 

This course involves an extended and in-depth exam- 
ination of how the films made in a particular country 
or region outside the United States are shaped by na- 
tionally prevailing socio-political and economic con- 
ditions, and express or articulate a sense of national 
identity. It may be organized around the exploration 
of a specific national cinema— such as French cin- 
ema, Italian cinema, or Japanese cinema— or a con- 
stellation of related national cinemas: for example, 
European cinemas, Latin American cinemas, or Af- 
rican cinemas. This course may be repeated for dif- 
ferent topics. Prerequisite: WRT102. 
3 credit hours. 

FLM360-69 Special Topics in Film History 
and Analysis 

This course involves the comprehensive study of a 
selected topic in the history, theory, and critical anal- 
ysis of film. The specific topic may be suggested by 
either faculty or student interest. This course may be 
repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: WRT102. 
3 credit hours. 

FLM380 Film Theory and Criticism 

This course entails the advanced examination of 
cinema from the perspective of film criticism and 
theory: writing about cinema that attempts to define 
the nature of film and its effects. Students will view 
and analyze a wide range of films, including early 
as well as recent American and foreign films, with 
reference to key texts of film theory and criticism. 
Prerequisites: WRT102 and FLM216. 
3 credit hours. 



380 Course Descriptions 



FLM498/499 Independent Study 

This course represents an opportunity for the student 
who wishes to undertake a well-defined research 
project in an area of film studies. While the student 
conducts work under the guidance of a faculty mem- 
ber of his or her choosing, the project is cairied out in 
an independent manner without regular class meet- 



ings. Effective independent study is characterized 
by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase 
in the individual student's responsibility and initia- 
tive in the learning process. Prerequisite: WRT102, 
FLM216. 

1-3 credit hours. 



FINANCE 



FIN300 Managerial Finance I 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course serves as an introduction to manage- 
rial finance and is required of all Business majors. 
Students learn the basics of time value of money, 
financial statement analysis, the cost of capital, and 
capital budgeting. Other major topics include a dis- 
cussion of the various types of financial assets and 
security markets, an introduction to risk and expect- 
ed return analysis, and an application of time value 
principles to price financial assets. Students will also 
be introduced to the foreign exchange market and 
how exchange rates effect the decision-making pro- 
cess of corporate financial managers. Prerequisites: 
Completion of ECO201 and either two accounting 
courses, and QBA260 or ACC220 and MAT350 
with grades of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

FIN310 Real Estate Finance 
Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course is a study of real estate principles with 
an emphasis on the broad coverage of topics includ- 
ing real estate financing, real estate valuation, the 
appraisal process, legal and regulatory issues, and 
mortgage securitization. Students will be taught cash 
flow projections and pricing of mortgage securities. 
Prerequisite: Completion of FIN300 and BUS345 
with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

FIN320 Investments 
Fall Semester 

This course is a study of the principles of investment 
management. Students learn the basics of the risk/ 
expected return tradeoff for the various types of fi- 
nancial as.sets, including stocks, bonds, options, and 
futures contracts. A main learning objective is for 



students to form optimal stock portfolios according 
to the convention developed by academic scholars. 
Students use both statistical and financial techniques 
to measure and evaluate risk. Other major topics 
include analysis of mutual funds, stock market ef- 
ficiency, security analysis, and portfolio evaluation. 
Prerequisite: Completion of FIN300 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

FIN330 Risk Management and Insurance 

Fall Semester 

A basic introduction to the fundamentals of life, prop- 
erty and casualty insurance, with emphasis on the 
various types of risks, contract analysis, and cost. 
3 credit hours. 

FIN340 Financial Institutions and Markets 

Fall Semester 

This course provides a study of the major financial in- 
stitutions and the role that major institutional investors 
serve in the current financial system. Topics include 
commercial banks, mutual funds, securities firms, in- 
surance companies, and pension funds. Prerequisite: 
Completion of FIN300 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IBS405 International Finance (formerly 

FIN400) 

Fall Semester 

Study of international aspects of financial transac- 
tions. Topics include: risk, expectations, and behavior 
or exchange rate; currency arrangements and the bal- 
ance of payments; international capital markets; in- 
ternational money markets; international liquidity and 
debt crisis. Prerequisites: Completion of ECO200, 
ECO201 , and FIN300 with grades of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 



Forensic Chemistry 381 



FIN410 Managerial Finance II 

Spring Semester 

This course serves as the second part of Manage- 
rial Finance I and is required of all economics and 
finance majors. Students use the decision-making 
tools acquired in Managerial Finance I to study 
corporate dividend policy, capital structure, share 
repurchases, stock splits, and security issues. 
A major portion of the course is a discussion on 
corporate mergers and acquisitions. Students will 
also be exposed to options and futures contracts 
and the various types of financial risk that can be 
hedged by using these derivative securities. Pre- 
requisite: Completion of FIN300 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

FIN420 Derivative Securities 

This course serves as an introduction to the rap- 
idly expanding derivatives market. Both hedging 
and speculating techniques are used to explore 
the use of options, future contracts, and swaps. 
Emphasis is placed on trade-off between risk and 
expected return and the advantage that derivative 
assets have over other, less risky assets. Prereq- 
uisite: Completion of FIN300 with a grade of 2.0 
or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

FIN450 Finance Seminar 
Spring Semester 

This capstone course will provide students with an 
opportunity for intense study in cuirent financial the- 
ory and unresolved issues of the current period. Pre- 
requisite: Completion of FIN300, FIN320, FIN340 



with a grade of 2.0 or higher, and senior standing in 
the major. 

3 credit hours. 

FIN490, FIN491 Finance Internship I and II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is supervised work experience at a 
business or government agency for students who 
have completed several major courses so that ap- 
plication of classroom learning can occur. Students 
are required to complete a minimum of 120 hours 
of work during the semester. Internships require 
students to meet periodically with a faculty super- 
visor, provide a written deliverable, and partici- 
pate in an end-of-internship evaluation. Prerequi- 
site: Completion of FIN300 with a 2.0 or higher 
and a minimum of 75 credit hours completed with 
at least a 2.5 GPA. Grading will be pass/fail. 
3 credit hours each semester. 

FIN492/FIN493 Finance Internship I and II 

This course is supervised work experience at a busi- 
ness or government agency for students who have 
completed several major courses so that application 
of classroom learning can occur. Students are re- 
quired to complete a minimum of 120 hours of work 
during the semester. Internships require students to 
meet periodically with a faculty supervisor, provide 
a written deliverable, and participate in an end-of- 
internship evaluation. Grade is pass/fail. Students 
admitted to the Dual Degree Program must also 
schedule MBA506 with FrN492 and MBA507 with 
FIN493 to fulfill the work experience requirement. 
Prerequisite: Completion of FIN300 with a 2.0 or 
higher and a minimum of 75 credit hours completed 
withat least a2.5 GPA. 

3 credit hours each semester. 



FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 



FCM200/CJA230 Criminalistics 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This is the first course in the Forensic Science cur- 
riculum. It is designed as a scientific overview of 
several areas of forensic science. Some of the ar- 
eas of study are: history of criminalistics, experts 
in the field of forensic science, fingerprinting, 
impression evidence, handwriting analysis, glass 



analysis, firearms, forensic serology, fire debris, 
and expert witnesses. Laboratory time is spent 
analyzing evidence discussed in several of these 
topics. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory (FCM201/CJA231). 

4 credit hours. 



382 Course Descriptions 



FCM362/CJA362 Crime Scene Processing 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This hands-on course focuses on the proper meth- 
ods of processing a crime scene to find the physi- 
cal evidence, protect it. document it, package it, and 
transport it to the laboratory facility. Scene security, 
sketching, photography, evidence packaging, and 
fingerprint processing will be covered. Mock crime 
scenes will also be used as teaching aides. Prerequi- 
site: FCM200/CJA230 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

FCM410 Forensic Body Fluid Analysis 

Spring Semester 

This course examines blood and other body fluids 
found at crime scenes. The history of the devel- 
opment of forensic serology, handling fluids at a 
crime scene, blood splatter interpretation, the spe- 
cific sequence of tests used in body fluid analysis, 
DNA analysis, and court presentation will be cov- 
ered. Prerequisites: FCM200, CHM236. BIO150 
with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 

3 class periods. 

1 three-hour laboratory. 

4 credit hours. 

FCM451 Forensic Laboratory Experience 
Spring Semester 

This laboratory-based course is designed to give 
the advanced student crime laboratory experience 



in examining, analyzing, and identifying evidence. 
In several simulated court presentations, students 
sharpen their skill in presenting evidence as a scien- 
tific expert. The areas covered are: hairs, fibers and 
polymers, glass, soil, gunshot residue, fire and bomb 
debris, and drugs. Prerequisites: FCM200, CHM236, 
CHM338. 

2 three-hour laboratories. 

2 credit hours. 

FCM480 Forensic Chemistry Independent 
Study 

In this course, the student chooses an in-depth study 
in a specialized area of forensic chemistry. The 
study will apply existing research to gain insight 
into the area(s) studied and or contribute research 
or techniques to the field of forensic chemistry. 
Prerequisites: FCM200, CHM236, CHM338. 

3 credit hours. 

FCM490 Forensic Chemistry Internship 

This off-campus internship is designed to give stu- 
dents an opportunity to expand and apply their class- 
room knowledge through workplace-gained experi- 
ence in forensic chemistry. The site supervisor and 
faculty supervisor will develop the internship cri- 
teria and then evaluate the student's performance. 
Prerequisites: FCM200, CHM236, CHM338. 
3 credit hours. 



GEOGRAPHY 



G243 introduction to Geography 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Explores the relationship between humans and the 
natural environment and provides a survey of the 
major political and cultural regions of the world. 
Use of maps and atlases. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

G260 Introduction to Cartography 

Introduction to the history and techniques of Car- 
tography. Principles and practice of field survey, 
photo-interpretation, remote sensing and computer 
assisted cartography. Use and application of carto- 
graphic skills in the various .sciences and disciplines. 
Not open to freshmen. 
3 credit hours. 



G331 Urban Geography 

Fall Semester 

Systematic study of the location and distribution of 
urban centers, their interval structure and form, ur- 
ban land use patterns, and geographical aspects of 
urban planning with special emphasis on the process 
of urbanization in North America. Not open to fresh- 
men. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

G332 Economic Geography 

Spring Semester 

Analysis of world patterns of economic activity 
and their implications for the global economy. 
Emphasis is placed on natural resources, popu- 
lation, food supply, trading patterns, and manu- 



Gerontology 383 



facturing and commercial activities. Not open to 
freshmen. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR 11. 

G336/H336 Historical Geography of North 
America 

This course offers a broad introduction to the 
historical geography of the United States through 
analysis of distinctive elements of regional land- 
scapes. Archival and contemporary photographs, 
cartographic representations, and many second- 
ary sources are utilized to develop and extend 
themes presented in the course textbook. Upon 
completion of this course, students will have a 
deeper understanding of the issues involved in 
the analysis of place at a variety of spatial scales. 
Students will also have a better sense of the his- 
torical layering of landscapes you encounter on 
a daily basis. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

G341 Geography of North America 
Fall Semester 

A regional study of the United States and Canada 
emphasizing physical, cultural and economic as- 
pects as well as geographic sub-regions. Emphasis 
on population patterns, sequent occupancy, and 
urban-industrial growth. Not open to freshmen. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

G348 Cultures and Environments Field 
Series 

Summer Semester 

This course is a field study of the human and physi- 
cal geographies of a particular international desti- 
nation (a specific destination will be chosen each 



year). Topics to be covered include: globalization, 
sustainable tourism, cultural, political and histori- 
cal geographies, architecture, economic develop- 
ment, climate, landforms, topography, and environ- 
mental conservation. Permission of the instructor 
is required. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

G350 Survey of Canada 

Spring Semester 

Geographic interpretation of Canada emphasizing 
physical environment, historical geography, econo- 
my, population trends, urbanism, bi-cultural accom- 
modation, and relations with the United States. Not 
open to freshmen. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

G361 Introduction to Geographic 
Information Systems 

Introduces students to the process of using geo- 
graphically registered data to analyze patterns 
and processes on the earth's surface. The analysis 
integrates database operations and computer gen- 
erated maps so as to provide information for the 
explanation of events, the prediction of outcomes, 
and strategic planning with application in a wide 
variety of disciplines such as business, history, 
government, biology, criminal justice, and public 
health. Fulfills an elective requirement for Infor- 
mation Systems majors. 
3 credit hours. 

G470- G479 Selected Topics in Geography 

Various advanced topics in the field of Geography. 
Prerequisite: G243. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 



GERONTOLOGY 



GER215 Social Aspects of Aging 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to be an introduction to the 
sociology of aging. A primary goal of the course 
is to sensitize students to the special issues of late 
life. It will include consideration of financial, legal, 
emotional, social contact and family factors. We will 
discuss various theoretical frameworks and current 
methodological issues in the field of gerontology. 



as well as controversies which exist regarding age- 
related issues. Prerequisite: SOCIOO or instructor's 
permission. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

GER280 Regulatory Issues in Long-Term Care 

Spring Semester, even-numbered years 

This course is designed to introduce the student to 
the various regulatory agencies and regulations that 



384 Course Descriptions 



govern the operational aspects of long-term care. 
Long-term care is driven by state and federal reg- 
ulations. Those pursuing careers in long term care 
administration or careers in ancillary professions 
of long-term care will gain an understanding of the 
formation and mandated implementation of regula- 
tions, as well as how to ensure compliance. 
3 credit hours. 

GER281 Administrative Issues in Long-Term 
Care 

Fall Semester, even-numbered years 

This course is designed to involve the student in the 
general administrative facet of nursing homes, in- 
cluding strategic planning. The effective integration 
of facility support services will be covered as well 
as family and community relations. Focus will be on 
the role of the administrator in management of the 
total organization. 
3 credit hours. 

GER282 Personal Care and Assisted Living 
Spring Semester 

This course is designed to enable students to focus 
on administration in personal care and assisted liv- 
ing homes. Topics will focus on administrative is- 
sues, regulations, fiscal management, physiological, 
and psychosocial issues of this population. Students 
will have the opportunity to visit a personal care 
home and interview staff and residents. 
3 credit hours. 

GER312/PSY312 Psychological Aspects of 
Aging 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is designed to provide students with a 
broad understanding of major topics and theories rel- 
evant to the cognitive, emotional, and developmen- 
tal topics in aging. Students will investigate health 
behaviors, sensation and perception, cognitive abili- 
ties, personality, social interactions, motivation and 
emotion, psychological disorders, end-of-life issues, 
and successful aging. The course will also focus on 
the methods u.sed to conduct research with an aging 
population. Prerequisite: PSYIOO. 
3 credit hours. 

GER316 Ethical Aspects of Aging 
Spring Semester 

The focus of this class is on applied ethics and ag- 



ing. This course will demonstrate how to approach 
ethical problems, how to make ethical decisions, 
and how to apply decision-making principles to 
ethical issues in everyday practice. Students will 
learn a step-by-step approach for working through 
difficult situations related to issues regarding the 
aging population. The course will examine tradi- 
tional ethical theories and contemporary issues 
such as community-based and long-term care pro- 
vision, legal and cultural issues, issues regarding 
vulnerable adults, issues related to dementia and 
end-of-life, and conducting research with older 
adults. Prerequisite: GER215 or GER315 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 
3 credit hours. 

GER320 Working with Older Adults 

Fall Semester 

This course will focus on the skills needed to work 
successfully with older persons. It will emphasize 
knowing the client, knowing the available support 
systems, and helping with the decision-making pro- 
cess to encourage independence and adequate care. 
Prerequisites: GER215 or GER315 or permission of 
the instructor. 

3 credit hours. 

GER330 Death, Dying, and Bereavement 

Spring Semester 

This course offers a broad overview of the psycho- 
logical aspects and individual and societal attitudes 
of death and dying in our society. Topics include 
attitudes toward and preparation for death; the un- 
derstanding of and care for terminally ill patients; 
funeral rituals; burial, mourning, and grief practices; 
grief counseling; suicide and euthanasia. Readings 
and classroom activities will be supplemented by 
students' self-exploration and writing on feelings, 
attitudes, and beliefs about death. 
3 credit hours. 

GER380 Fiscal Issues in Long Term Care 

Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course will cover issues of fiscal management, 
including budgeting and third-party reimbursements. 
Risk management will be investigated in terms of fi- 
nancing, liabilities, and insurances. 
3 credit hours. 



Healthcare Coding 385 



GER382 Resident Care Issues 

Fall Semester, odd-numbered years 

This course involves the student in the direct services 
available to residents of long-term care facilities. 
The roles of the nursing departments, resident care 
management, rehabilitation, special care, dietary and 
nutrition, pharmacy and health support services will 
be covered. 

3 credit hours. 

GER390, GER391, GER392 Selected Topics in 
Gerontology 

Spring Semester 

A study of a specific topic of interest to gerontolo- 
gists. including, but not limited to public policy, con- 
troversial issues, abuse issues, and group work with 
the elderly. 

3 credit hours. 

GER410 Clinical Aspects of Aging 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

A survey of the known physiological changes of the 



aging process and their psychological consequences. 
Present research in cellular, immunological, percep- 
tual, and neurological changes will be emphasized. 
Prerequisite: GER215 OR GER315 or permission of 
the instructor. 

3 credit hours. 

GER498, GER499 Gerontology Independent 
Study 

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu- 
nity for the student who wishes to undertake a well- 
defined research project. While the student conducts 
his work under the guidance of a faculty member of 
his own choosing, the project is carried out in an in- 
dependent manner without regular class meetings. 
Effective independent study is characterized by a re- 
duction in formal instruction and an increase in the 
individual student's responsibility and initiative in 
the learning process. 

1-3 credit hours each semester. 



HEALTHCARE CODING 



HCC215 Medical Terminology 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an introduction to the specialized lan- 
guage of medicine through the study of Greek and 
Latin prefixes, suffixes, and root words. Students 
will develop a familiarity with highly technical and 
specialized terminology. 
3 credit hours. 

HCC220 HCPCS (HCFA Common Procedural 
Coding System) Coding 
Spring Semester 

This course introduces the Health Care Financing 
Administration Common Procedural Coding Sys- 
tem (HCPCS) used to report physician and non-phy- 
sician services provided to Medicare and Medicaid 
patients in the ambulatory and outpatient settings. 
Emphasis is placed on "National Codes" (Level II) 
and "Local Codes" (Level III) of HCPCS. Also in- 
cluded is the use of modifiers for both Level II and 
Level III codes. Prerequisites: HCC215 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 
1 credit hour. 



HCC221 Current Procedural Terminology 
(CPT) Coding 
Spring Semester 

This course provides students with an in-depth 
study of the coding principles of Physician's Cur- 
rent Procedural Terminology (CPT-4). Students 
will learn to classify procedures and services pro- 
vided by physicians and other healthcare providers. 
The use of CPT in the physician's office, ambula- 
tory surgery, and emergency department will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite: HCC215 or permission 
of instructor. 

1 credit hour. 

HCC222 Health Classifications and 
Reimbursement Systems 

Spring Semester 

This course includes the purpose of classifying dis- 
eases and procedures and the differences between 
nomenclatures and classifications. An in-depth 
study will be made of the International Classifica- 
tion of Diseases and its various modifications. Also 
included will be the purposes, construction, and uses 
of other classification systems and nomenclatures. In 



386 Course Descriptions 



addition. Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs), case- 
mix management, and reimbursement systems will 
be presented. Prerequisites: HCC215 or permission 
of instructor. 

3 credit hours. 

HCC225 Healthcare Insurance 
Reimbursement 

Spring Semester 

This course explores the many different insurance 
coverages available to healthcare patients in the 
United States and how facilities and practitioners 
are reimbursed for care provided. Instruction in- 
cludes legal issues affecting insurance claims, the 
use of diagnostic and procedural coding in reim- 
bursement and electronic data submission. In-depth 
study will be made of managed care systems, pri- 
vate insurance plans, Medicaid, Medicare, TRI- 
CARE, Workers' Compensation, and Disability 
Income Insurance. Prerequisites: HCC215 or per- 
mission of instructor. 
3 credit hours. 

HCC230 Concepts in Pharmacology 

Spring Semester 

This course is an introduction to concepts of phar- 
macology. It is designed to provide the student 
with knowledge of basic pharmacological ter- 
minology and concepts, drug categories, mecha- 
nisms of drug action, drug forms, routes of ad- 
ministration, and common generic and proprietary 



name medications. This knowledge base is then 
applied clinically to analysis of health informa- 
tion and diagnostic and procedure coding. Prereq- 
uisite: HCC215. 
1 credit hour. 

HCC235 Pathophysiology 

Spring Semester 

Basic human physiology and its application to the 
disease process is reviewed in this course. The 
course covers the etiology, pathology, clinical signs, 
and symptoms as well as treatment and prevention 
of common inpatient and outpatient diseases and 
conditions. Prerequisites: BIO106, HCC215, or per- 
mission of instructor. 
4 credit hours. 

HCC240 Coding Practicum 

Spring Semester 

This course provides the student with experience in 
coding and DRG assignment of health records us- 
ing ICD-9-CM, CPT, and HCPCS coding systems. 
Clinical site supervisors will instruct and evaluate 
all coding performed by the student in the health- 
care setting under the direction of the instructor. 
This coding practicum is designed to reinforce 
classroom coding and health insurance instruc- 
tion. Corequisites: HCC220, HCC221, HCC222, 
HCC225. 

120 clinical hours. 

3 credit hours. 



HISTORY 



H219, H220 The History of Western 
Civilization I, II 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

A survey of material from prehistory to the present; 
the civilizations of the Near East and the Mediter- 
ranean; medieval history; the Renaissance and 
Reformation; the expansion of Europe, the French 
Revolution; the Industrial Revolution; Nationalism 
in Italy, Germany, and the Balkans; the First World 
War; interwar Europe, the Second World War, and 
contemporary history. 

3 credit hours each semester. 

Satisfies ADR IV. 



H221, H222 History of American 
Civilization I, II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

An integrated survey of the cultural, social, political, 
and economic development of the United States from 
1492 to the present. The first semester (H22I) cov- 
ers the period from the Age of Exploration to the end 
of the Civil War; the second semester (H222) traces 
American development from Reconstruction to the 
present. In both courses emphasis will be on the evo- 
lution of a distinctive American culture and character. 

3 credit hours each semester. 

Satisfies ADR IV. 



History 387 



H227 Colonial History of Latin America 

The history of Latin America begins with its earli- 
est inhabitants. The Aztec, Inca, and Maya civiliza- 
tions will be examined for their many contributions. 
Following the conquest, the Spanish and Portuguese 
empires will be carefully studied for their econom- 
ics, religion, society, and daily life. The course con- 
cludes with a discussion of independence and the 
colonial legacy. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H228 Modern Latin America 

Using the leading survey textbook in its field, this 
course uses an in-depth case study approach to 
the study of Latin America. Major countries such 
as Mexico. Brazil. Chile, and Argentina are high- 
lighted with themes such as immigration, political 
leadership, and military takeovers. The course con- 
cludes with a look at U.S. -Latin American relations 
including drug trafficking and the rise of democ- 
racy. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H233 Pre-Columbian Civilizations: The Incas 

This course provides an in-depth examination of the 
Inca Indian civilization from the year 1000 B.C. to 
the coming of the Spanish in 1530. Both historical 
and archaeological records are presented and inter- 
preted. Inca cosmology, subsistence strategies, so- 
cial structure, intellectual and artistic achievements 
are examined. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H234 Pre-Columbian Civilizations: 
The Mayas 

This course provides an in-depth examination of the 
Mayan Indian civilization from the year 1000 B.C. 
to the coming of the Spanish in 1520. Bothhistorical 
and archaeological records are presented and inter- 
preted. Maya cosmology, subsistence strategies, so- 
cial structure, intellectual and artistic achievements 
are examined. Recent research concerning decipher- 
ment will be discussed. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H235 Pre-Columbian Civilizations: 
The Aztecs 

This course provides an in-depth examination of the 
Aztec Indian civilization from the year 1000 A.D. to 
the coming of the Spanish in 1520. Both historical 



and archaeological records are presented and inter- 
preted. Aztec cosmology, subsistence strategies, so- 
cial structure, intellectual and artistic achievements 
are examined. 

3 credit hours. 

H240 Methods and Theory in History 

This course introduces the student to methods and 
theories employed when doing historical research 
and interpretation. The course will prepare the stu- 
dent for advanced work in the field. Students will 
develop a wide array of research methods, interpre- 
tive techniques, analytical strategies, and presen- 
tation approaches. Students will also explore the 
philosophy of history and survey the ways that his- 
torical methods and interpretations have evolved. At 
the conclusion of the semester, students will dem- 
onstrate their understanding of course material by 
producing an interpretive scholarly historical essay. 
Prerequisites: H22] , H222, H219, or H220. 
3 credit hours. 

H245 The American Military Experience 

This course examines the origins and evolution of 
American military institutions, traditions, and prac- 
tices from 1775 to the present. It will emphasize mil- 
itary policy, organization, technology, and employ- 
ment together with their relation to contemporary 
political, social, and economic developments during 
the era under study. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H300 Oral History: Techniques and Research 

Oral history is a technique for creating and preserv- 
ing original information. It is both a research method 
and a teaching tool. Through informed and empa- 
thetic interviewing, we acquire information about 
families, individuals, and organizations. Conducted 
properly, oral history is a limitless technique for ex- 
ploring and documenting the variety of human ex- 
periences. Local projects have included well-known 
area residents, the paper industry. Holocaust survi- 
vors, Vietnam Veterans, the Greek- American com- 
munity, and York College. 
3 credit hours. 

H303 History of Africa I 

Survey of Africa from the prehistoric period to the 
colonial era. Emphasis is placed on the development 



388 Course Descriptions 



of indigenous states, the early influence of Europe- 
ans, the evolution of the slave trade, and the 19th 
century colonial partition. Not open to freshmen. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H305 History of Africa II 

Study of the historical evolution of independence/ 
liberation movements, decolonization, restoration 
of African self-governance and current crises and 
transformations in post-independence Africa. Not 
open to freshmen. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H306 Race and Racism in the Americas 

A historical survey of race and racism in the United 
States. The course will include historical experience 
of various minority groups (i.e., Blacks, Indians, 
Hispanics, Asians, etc.). Discussion will include po- 
litical, legal, economic, cultural, and social aspects 
of racism. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H307 North American Environmental 
History 

Environmental history studies the changing relation- 
ship between human beings and the natural world 
through time. Through readings and discussions 
we will examine a variety of influential issues and 
themes, from the pre-colonial period to the present, 
including the impact of settlement on the land and 
the rise of the modern environmental movement. 
Our central premise throughout will be that much of 
the familiar terrain of American history looks very 
different when seen in its environmental context, 
and that one can learn a great deal about both history 
and the environment by studying the two together. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H309 Europe in the 19th Century 

This course will examine the political, social, cultur- 
al, and economic history of Europe from the French 
Revolution to the First World War (1789-1914). Us- 
ing primary and secondary sources, students will 
examine the causes and consequences of the French 
Revolution; the development of liberalism, socialism, 
conservatism, nationalism; industrialization and its 
con.sequences; the impact of science on .society and 
culture; and international relations and imperialism. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 



H310 Europe after 1914 

In the 20th century, Europe went from the height of 
its power into war, genocide, and division between 
East and West. Since 1990 and the end of the Cold 
War, Europe has faced new challenges, including 
ethnic violence, economic difficulties, multicultur- 
alism, and globalization. Using primary and second- 
ary sources, students will examine the history of Eu- 
rope from the First World War to the present. Course 
themes include the problem of war and peace; dic- 
tatorship and democracy; racism/genocide and toler- 
ance; the state and the people; East/West divisions; 
and European integration. 

3 credit hours Satisfies ADR II. 

H316 Ancient History (Prehistory to 476) 

The civilizations of the ancient world lay the foun- 
dation for all later western societies, including ours 
today. This course will provide an introduction into 
prehistory, the rise of the civilizations in Mesopo- 
tamia and the Fertile Crescent region, the glory of 
ancient Egypt, the achievements of the Greek and 
Hellenistic worlds, and the rise and decline of Rome. 
It will incorporate traditional emphases on political, 
social, economic, religious, and cultural develop- 
ments, which will be investigated in part by examin- 
ing a variety of primary source material that survive 
from antiquity. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II, 

H317 Medieval Civilization 

The thousand-year period from approximately 450 
to 1450, known as the Middle Ages, was a formative 
period in the development of much of Europe and 
the Middle East, and brought western civilization 
from antiquity to the brink of modernity. This course 
will provide a broad introduction to the history and 
culture of the Middle Ages, and will explore tradi- 
tional themes in medieval history, such as the rise of 
Christianity and the Church, growth and evolution 
of the feudal and manorial systems, state building, 
and late medieval crises and conflicts, as well as the 
social and cultural experiences of men and women 
from all walks of life. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H318 Renaissance and Reformation 

Between 1350 and 1600. two major movements, 
the Renaissance and Reformation, transformed the 
Middle Ages into the Early Modern period, affected 



History 389 



the politics, economics, education, religion, warfare, 
and culture of Europe, and paved the way for mod- 
ern society. This course will provide an introduction 
to the Early Modern period, and will explore the Re- 
naissance as a cultural and intellectual movement, 
the causes for and development of religious changes 
during the Reformation and Catholic Reformation, 
and the political and economic changes wrought 
both within Europe and without as a result of ex- 
ploration. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H330 History of 20th Century Russia and C.I.S. 

A study of Russia from 1861 to present: Russia on 
the eve of World War I and 1917 Revolution: collapse 
of Tsarist Russia and formation of the U.S.S.R.; do- 
mestic developments and foreign relations under the 
Communist regime, prior, during, and after World 
War II; collapse and disintegration of the Soviet 
Union and formation of the Commonwealth of In- 
dependent States. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

H333, H334 History of Britain 

A survey of the major political . economic , and social 
trends in Britain from 55 B.C. to the present. The 
first semester will trace the evolution of the British 
people and their government from the Roman con- 
quest to the end of the 17th century. The second se- 
mester will concentrate on the evolution of a consti- 
tutional monarchy and the creation of Empire from 
the 17th century to the present. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H335 Germany 1815-Present 

This course will explore the political, social, eco- 
nomic, and cultural developments in Germany from 
the period after the French Revolution to the pres- 
ent. It will also examine the various interpretive ap- 
proaches provided by historians of Germany to ac- 
count for its destructive history. Topics that will be 
covered include: the impact of the French Revolu- 
tion on German nationalism and the development of 
German politics; Bismarck and German unification; 
the state, politics, economics, culture, and society 
under the German empire; Germany and World War 
I; the Weimar Republic; Hitler, National Socialism, 
and the Holocaust; the division of Germany after 
World War II; and the Revolution of 1989. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 



H336/G336 Historical Geography of North 
America 

This course offers a broad introduction to the histori- 
cal geography of the United States through analysis 
of distinctive elements of regional landscapes. Ar- 
chival and contemporary photographs, cartographic, 
representations, and many secondary sources are 
utilized to develop and extend themes presented in 
the course textbook. Upon completion of this course, 
students will have a deeper understanding of the is- 
sues involved in the analysis of place at a variety of 
spatial scales. They will also have a better sense of 
the historical layering of landscapes they encounter 
on a daily basis. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H340/WGS340 Women and War 

This course will analyze military conflict from the 
perspective of gender. The experience of women 
will be the focus of the course, but the course will 
also examine how gendered concepts related to be- 
ing male and female play a role in the making of 
war. Students will analyze the effects of war on 
women's status and will examine the impact of war 
on gender roles and the relationship between men 
and women. Course content will be drawn from 
major world conflicts, including WWI and WWII, 
as well as post-World War II regional and national 
conflicts. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H342/WGS342 Women in the United States: 
A History 

This course will analyze the history of women in 
the United States from the colonial period to the 
present. The course will attempt to understand the 
impact which political, social, economic, and racial 
aspects of American history have had on American 
women, and, conversely, the impact women in the 
United States have had on developments within 
these areas. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H351 American Colonial History (1607-1760) 

Colonial origins of the United States including a 
study of institutions, values, thought, and cultural 
development prior to the American Revolution. Em- 
phasis is given to the roots of this nation's political, 
economic, social, and constitutional traditions. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 



390 Course Descriptions 



H352 The New American Nation (1760- 
1815) 

Events, ideas, and personalities associated with 
creation of the American Republic. The focus of 
the course will be on the creation of the American 
Constitution and its implementation during the Jef- 
fersonian era. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H353 The Jacl<sonian Era (Middle Period, 
1816-1846) 

An analysis of the political, economic, and social 
forces which characterized this period in American 
history. Growing sectional tensions, major person- 
alities, and popular culture will be stressed. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H354 Coming of the Civil War 1846-1861 

This course will examine the conflicting currents in 
American history between 1846-1861 that led the 
nation into the Civil War. Particular attention will be 
focused on the intricate relationships between slav- 
ery, racism, economics, and politics. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H355 Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861 

This course will analyze the political, economic, and 
military ramifications of the Civil War itself. It will 
examine also the relationships between politics, eco- 
nomics, and race during the Reconstruction period 
in order to gain an understanding of both the limits 
and legacy of that era. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H356 The Emergence of Modern America, 
1877-1914 

A continuation of the American history sequence, 
from the end of the Reconstruction through the Wil- 
son era. Emphasis will be placed the emergence of 
a modern state, culture, and economy. Topics to be 
discussed include: industrialization, immigration, 
and urbanization; the politics of the Gilded Age and 
progressive era; overseas expansion; and the rise of 
the United States as a world power. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H357 Twentieth Century American History, 
1914-1945 

This course will examine American history from 
1914 to 1945, a topsy-turvy period during which 



time Americans experienced a boom, a bust, and two 
world wars. Among the subjects that the class will 
examine closely are: the Red Scare, the Scopes Trial, 
Prohibition, the Great Crash, the New Deal, and the 
home front during World War II. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H358 Recent America, 1945-Present 

An intensive examination of U.S. history from 1945 
to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the Cold 
War, the civil rights, women's and antiwar move- 
ments of the 1960s, and the economic changes of the 
1970s and 1980s. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H371/PS371 American Constitutional 
Thought: Political Institutions 

This course will provide an understanding of the 
development of the American constitutional system. 
Emphasis will be given to the writing of the U.S. 
Constitution and the evolution of constitutional law 
as it relates to the Congress, the Presidency, the Ju- 
diciary, the bureaucracy, and the place of state gov- 
ernments in American history. This course is cross- 
listed as PS371 . 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H372/PS372 American Constitutional 
Thought: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights 

This course will provide an understanding of the 
development of the American constitutional system. 
Emphasis will be given to the Supreme Court's role in 
defining and protecting civil liberties such as speech, 
press, religion, privacy, due process, and equal pro- 
tection. This course is cross-listed as PS372. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H382 British Empire 

This course traces the development and decline of 
the British Empire from the 17th century to the pres- 
ent, paying particular attention to the 19th and early 
20th century when the Empire was at its peak. 
3 credit hours. 

H384 History of Modern Ireland 

This course examines the important political, social, 
and cultural developments in Ireland from the 18th 
Century to the present, focusing on Ireland's rela- 
tionship with Great Britain, on connections between 



History 391 



Ireland and America, and on conflicting interpreta- 
tions of Irish national identity. 
3 credit hours. 

H385, H386 Special Topics in American History 

These courses provide coverage of topics of special 
interest in American history. 
3 credit hours. 

H387, H388 Special Topics in World History 

These courses provide coverage of topics of special 
interest in world (non-U.S.) history. 
3 credit hours. 

H391 The Vikings 

The Vikings still manage to evoke images of dread 
and violence after a thousand years, but is this really 
the sum total of who they were? In this course, we 
will meet the Vikings in all of their guises: as farm- 
ers, traders, explorers, colonists, mercenaries, and 
plunderers. We will follow their travels and exploits 
from Scandinavia to the Mediterranean to Russia 
to North America. We will investigate the ways in 
which they influenced and were influenced by other 
early medieval peoples. We will look at their art and 
architecture, read their literature, and read what oth- 
ers wrote about them. In essence, this course will 
show the Vikings to be more than just violent pagan 
warriors. 

3 credit hours. 

H395 The European Witch Craze 

Between the 15th and 17th centuries, many Europe- 
ans became increasingly concerned about the phe- 
nomenon of witchcraft, viewing accused witches 
as enemies of society and pawns of the devil, who 
needed to be eliminated. This time of heightened 
fear and panic often has been dubbed "the Witch 
Craze," and can be seen as an illustration of a society 
in transition. This course traces the intellectual, reli- 
gious, and social changes in society responsible for 
new ideas and beliefs toward witchcraft, as well as 
explores the growing fear of witches and the ensuing 
hysteria and persecutions that gripped Europe. 
3 credit hours. 

H400 The First World War 

This course provides students with an in-depth ex- 
amination of the Eirst World War (1914-1918) as 
a watershed in world history. As the first total war, 



the Great War involved a new war experience on the 
battle and home fronts. The destructive capacity of 
new industrialized military technologies necessitat- 
ed massive mobilization of men and women. Stu- 
dents will examine various interpretations regarding 
the war's causes, the impact of the war on soldiers 
and civilians, the geo-political consequences of the 
war and its peace, and consider the cultural, social, 
and political legacy of the war for the world in which 
we live today. 

3 credit hours. 

H401 Classical Social History 

The lives of men and women in Classical Greece 
and Rome were effectively defined by two spheres: 
public and private. This dichotomy affected most 
aspects of life, everything from family life and rela- 
tionships between the sexes, to religious beliefs and 
practices, to leisure activities, to societal expecta- 
tions and norms. This course will use a broad array 
of primary and secondary evidence, including art 
and literature, to explore life in the ancient world, 
and to analyze the ways in which the divide between 
public and private is different from that in our own 
society. 

3 credit hours. 

H404 The Black Death 

Few natural disasters throughout history have gar- 
nered as much interest and examination as the 14th 
century epidemic known as the Black Death. Re- 
sponsible for the deaths of as much as half of the 
European population in as little as three years, the 
Black Death also set the stage for major economic, 
cultural, and spiritual upheaval that ultimately led to 
the transition from medieval to early modern Europe. 
This course will investigate the status of Europe just 
prior to the arrival of the Black Death, the course of 
the pestilence itself, the effects of the Black Death 
and its recurring waves over the next 1 50 years, and 
current scholarly debates that surround these issues. 
3 credit hours. 

H420 Nazi Germany 

This course provides students with the opportunity 
to examine one of the most troubling episodes in 
history and to deal with the difficult issues relating 
to the Third Reich, the Holocaust, and historical in- 
terpretations of the period 1933-1945 in Germany. 
In this course, students will study the background to 



392 Course Descriptions 



the Nazi era through an examination of anti-demo- 
cratic structures in pre-World War I Germany. Ger- 
many's defeat in World War I, and the weakness and 
collapse of the Weimar Republic. Students will then 
examine the success of Hitler and the Nazi Party; the 
structure of the Nazi state, including politics, soci- 
ety, and economics; Nazi racism and anti-Semitism; 
Germany and World War II; and the Holocaust. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II, 

H421, H422 Special Topics in American History 

SeeH385.H386. 

H423, H424 Special Topics in World History 

SeeH387.H388. 

H425, H426 Special Topics in British History 

These courses provide coverage of topics of special 
interest in British history. 
3 credit hours. 

H440 Senior Seminar in History 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Selected topics dealing with research, methodology, 
and philosophy of historical thought. Open to seniors 
with a major in history. Prerequisite: H240. 
3 credit hours. 

H460, H461 History Internship 

Specialized historical experience with local historical 
agencies. The internship is designed to introduce the 
student to the broad range of public history activities. 
These include archival management, curatorial, mu- 
seum educator and research activities. Departmental 
approval is required in advance. Pass/fail only. 
3 credit hours. 

H470-H489 Special Topics 

Various topics in history ranging from America in 
the 1920s to the European Union. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR II. 

H470 The Civil Rights Movement 

This course will examine one of the most signifi- 
cant developments in American history, the civil 
rights movement. Not only did this movement have 
a tremendous impact on the United States, its lead- 
ers, ideals, and actions, it inspired others to fight for 
their own freedom in the U.S. and abroad. During 
the course, students will examine the civil rights 
movement as a broad-based movement that involved 



millions of individuals, black and white, young and 
old. male and female. Students will read primary 
and secondary sources, watch films, and conduct re- 
search projects. 

3 credit hours. 

H472 America in the Sixties 

This course will examine the 1960s, one of the most 
turbulent eras in U.S. history. Over 30 years after the 
decade ended, the 1960s remain important to histori- 
ans and the public, one of the most contested territo- 
ries of the past. To better understand this period, stu- 
dents will be introduced to a wide variety of primary 
and secondary sources, ranging from political mani- 
festos and speeches to the music of the era. Most of 
the classes will be conducted as a seminar, and class 
participation is central to success in the course. 
3 credit hours. 

H475 Native American History 

This course provides an examination of Native 
American civilization. The course focuses on the 
Native American experience in North America after 
European contact. The role that Native Americans 
played during European settlement, during the Rev- 
olutionary period, and during westward expansion 
as well as an assessment of contemporary Native 
American conditions are among the primary topics 
covered by the course. 
3 credit hours. 

H477, H478, PS479, PS480 European Union 

This course is designed to provide students with the 
opportunity to study the institutions and decision- 
making processes of the European Union (EU) for 
the purpose of participating in a Modern European 
Union simulation. Students will learn about the EU 
as a unique international organization, and consider 
the issues and difficulties the EU and its member 
states face as they confront policy-making chal- 
lenges. Students may participate in an experiential 
learning activity that is an annual Model EU simu- 
lation. Students will prepare to play the role of an 
actual EU-level politician. Students may take the 
course multiple times for credit, with a different role 
required year to year. 
3 credit hours. 

H484 Baseball History 

This course about baseball history provides a unique 



Humanities 393 



study of both the American historical and cultural ex- 
periences. While focusing upon the players, teams, 
and events that are a part of the game, the course in- 
tegrates various related fields including labor history, 
black history, and the history of American immigra- 
tion. Equally important is the study of the place that 
baseball has come to play within American art, litera- 
ture, music, and architecture. 
3 credit hours. 

H486 Holocaust in Film 

This course will examine film representations of 
the Holocaust and the Third Reich, including docu- 
mentaries, independent films, television programs, 
and award winning Hollywood and foreign films. 
This course will assist students in developing the 
skills necessary to read film and the moving image 
as a genre of historical interpretation. Students will 
be asked to discuss the role (and appropriateness) 
of film for conveying the Holocaust experience to 



contemporary audiences. Students will combine a 
reading of film with supporting historiographical and 
primary source materials to develop their analyses of 
the films. Film content may be revised to reflect new 
releases or availability. 
3 credit hours. 

H498-H499 Independent Study 

The Independent Study Program affords an opportu- 
nity for students who wish to undertake a well-de- 
fined research project. While these students conduct 
their work under the guidance of a faculty member 
of their own choosing, the project is carried out in 
an independent manner without regular class meet- 
ings. Effective independent study is characterized by 
a reduction in formal instruction and an increase in 
the individual student's responsibility and initiative 
in the learning process. 

1-3 credit hours each semester. 



HUMANITIES 



HUM230 Studies In London 

This course offers students an opportunity to gain 
ADR I credit by studying a humanities-related topic 
in London during Mini-Mester. The topic changes 
depending on the instructor. The course includes 
both class sessions and numerous excursions to des- 
tinations in and near London: specific locations will 
be determined by the instructor. This course greatly 
reinforces the humanities-associated goal of demon- 
strating how, broadly speaking, an understanding of 
culture and cultural interactions can lead to a better- 
ment of the human condition. Additionally, students 
will not only become aware of the impact of culture 
on their own identity and of increasingly important 
globalization issues but become active global citi- 
zens themselves. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 

HUIVI242 Science and Religion 

This course deals with the ways science and religion 
understand and encounter each other, and explores 
ways in which science and religion can pursue a mu- 
tually beneficial relationship. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR I. 



HUM380 Special Topics in Humanities 

This course offers an interdisciplinary examination 
of central issues and themes in the area of liberal arts 
studies. The specific theme of the course may be sug- 
gested by faculty and/or student interest. Topics may 
include: Human Nature in the Humanities, God in 
the Humanities. Creativity in the Humanities, Revo- 
lution in the Humanities, Power in the Humanities, 
Justice in the Humanities. Prerequisites: WRT102. 
3 credit hours. 

HUM450, HUIVI451 Humanities Internship 

The purpose of an internship is to provide students 
with practical training and supervised work experi- 
ence in appropriate firms or organizations. Intern- 
ships are designed to give students an opportunity 
to make use of the practical aspects of their class- 
room knowledge, to complement and extend their 
classroom experiences, and to develop their un- 
derstanding and confidence through a work-related 
experience. Responsibilities will vary according to 
placement as determined by the work supervisors of 
the sponsoring agency and faculty coordinator. Stu- 
dents are required to spend a minimum of 120 hours 
work on site. Students must have earned 60 or more 



394 Course Descriptions 



credits and a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point 
average at the time of application and complete an 
internship application. 
3 credit hours. 

HUM498, HUIVI499 Independent Study 

An opportunity for the student who wishes to under- 
take a well-defined, interdisciplinary research proj- 
ect in the humanities. While the student conducts 



work under the guidance of a faculty member of his 
or her own choosing, the project is carried out in an 
independent manner without regular class meetings. 
Effective independent study is characterized by a re- 
duction in formal instruction and an increase in the 
individual student's responsibility and initiative in 
the learning process. 
3 credit hours. 



INFORMATION LITERACY 

IFL101 Information Literacy 
Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters 

In this Core Curriculum course, the students will de- 
velop the necessary research skills to locate, evaluate, 
and present information for their courses and for their 
careers. They will learn professional use of many elec- 



tronic communication and presentation tools, legal 
and ethical use of information in all media formats, 
and navigation of the York College network, Schmidt 
Library resources, and the Internet. They will also dis- 
cuss the implications of living in a digital society. 
2 credit hours. 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS 



IFS100 Information Technology (IT) 
Competency Exam 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

IPS 100 is a surrogate for a computer competency 
exam. Students are required to pass all components 
of the competency exam within the first 30 credits; 
otherwise, they are required to take IPS 105 within 
their first 30 credits. The exam covers fundamental 
concepts of Microsoft Windows and the Microsoft 
Office applications of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. 
The exam will be given four times during a semester. 
Students are encouraged to practice for this exam 
and materials and instructions will be provided via 
the normal textbook buying procedures. Mandatory 
pass/fail grading. 
credit hours. 

IFS105 Personal Productivity Computing 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

Presents the fundamentals of computers and com- 
puter terminology. Stresses the importance of 
computers as essential components of the business 
world and society in general. Extensive lab segment 
focuses on the computer as a personal productivity 
tool using word processing, spreadsheets, presenta- 



tion managers, and databases. Mandatory pass/fail 
grading. 

3 credit hours. 

IFS160 Visual BASIC Programming 

Fall Semester 

Introduces students to programming in the Win- 
dows environment using the BASIC family of lan- 
guages. Windows concepts that are covered include 
programming forms, command buttons, drop-down 
and list boxes, labels, text boxes, and other controls. 
BASIC programming features that are covered in- 
clude variables, control statements, data validation, 
aiTays, and file processing. Other topics include de- 
signing event-based programs, flowcharting, struc- 
ture charts, and object-oriented concepts. Prerequi- 
site: Successful completion of IPS 100 or IPS 105. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS175 Development Fundamentals 

Spring Semester 

This course introduces the fundamentals required 
to develop information systems. Students will be 
introduced to the rationale for applying recognized 
analysis and design techniques prior to writing and 
implementing programs. Students will understand 



Information Systems 395 



how and why a basic understanding of analysis 
and design principles is fundamental to informa- 
tion systems development. These topics, along with 
rudimentary introduction to programming topics of 
syntax, logic, and mathematics, will be presented in 
the C# language. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS200 Introduction to Programming and 
Software Engineering I (replaced by IFS225 
beginning Fall 2010) 
Fall Semester 

This course introduces software engineering 
through problem solving and computer program- 
ming. Programming techniques covered by this 
course include modularity, abstraction, top-down 
design, specifications, documentation, debugging, 
and testing. Topics are introduced through proj- 
ects in the C# language. The core material for this 
course includes syntax, logic, mathematics, meth- 
ods, recursion, arrays, strings, records, sorting, file 
creation and access, database access, Microsoft 
Windows screen creation, scieintific applications, 
business applications, and various file conversion 
techniques. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 
IFS100orIFS105. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS201 Introduction to Programming and 
Software Engineering II (no longer offered 
after Spring 2010) 

Spring Semester 

This course continues the development of program- 
ming and problem-solving skills, focusing on ob- 
ject-oriented methods such as namespaces, classes, 
attributes, methods, data abstraction, procedural 
abstraction, and the creation of dynamic link librar- 
ies (dlls). Programming projects for this course use 
the C# language. The core material for this course 
builds upon the information gleaned from IFS200. 
Emphasis is placed on analyzing business problems 
and creating information system solutions through 
object-oriented programming techniques. File orga- 
nizations, storage concepts, database access as well 
as network utilization are presented. Prerequisites: 
IFS200 with a grade of 2.0 or higher and completion 
of MAT 120 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 



IFS205 Workgroup Productivity Computing 
(no longer offered after Spring 2010) 
Spring Semesters 

This course focuses on the planning, design, imple- 
mentation, and maintenance of software systems 
for facilitating working in teams. Examples of rel- 
evant group support systems such as collaborative 
systems, computer supported collaborative work 
(CSCW) systems. Group Decision Support Systems 
(GDSS). email, and video conferencing systems are 
examined. This course extends some of the concepts 
taught in IFS105 and introduces new concepts such 
as peer-to-peer networking, security and privacy of 
information, and data integrity in a multi-user en- 
vironment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 
IFS100orIFS105. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS225 Programming Business Applications 
Fall Semester 

Students will build upon the basics presented in 
IFS175 and learn how to develop programs and 
software to support business operations. The stu- 
dent will learn via lectures, demonstrations, com- 
plex programming examples and assignments how 
to develop and support business software applica- 
tions. The course will focus on fail access, manipu- 
lation, and conversion as well as database access 
and the development of console, windows, and mo- 
bile applications. This course will firmly establish 
the concepts of coding, scripting, and API integra- 
tion in support of business processes. Development 
will be in the C# and the ".net" environment. Pre- 
requisite: IFS 175 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS285 Introduction to Database 

Spring Semester (beginning Spring 2011) 

This course is an introduction to database technolo- 
gy and database theory. Students will learn the prin- 
ciples of sound relational database design as well 
as the use of Structured Query Language (SQL) for 
building data structures and retrieving data. The use 
of SQL will be emphasized through hands-on exer- 
cises and course projects. In addition to fundamental 
database design theory, students will also explore 
how organizations leverage database technology 
to strategically and operationally support multiple 
business functions and processes. 
3 credit hours. 



396 Course Descriptions 



IFS305 Management Information Systems 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

A comprehensive discussion of the role of computer 
based information systems in modem organizations. 
Integrates managerial and computer knowledge to- 
wards identifying and solving information problems. 
Computer literacy is extended to MIS literacy by 
means of hands-on project cases in Decision Sup- 
port Systems. This is a writing-intensive and critical- 
thinking course. Prerequisite: Successful completion 
of IFS 1 00 or IFS 1 05 and completion of MGT 1 50 with 
a grade of 2.0 or higher, or permission of instructor. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS320 Web Development 

Fall Semester 

This course is an introduction to web-based system 
development methods. Emphasis will be placed on 
designing and building data-based solutions to com- 
mon web-based, interactive, e-commerce, and col- 
laborative information systems. Languages used 
may include Java. Perl. Visual Basic, C#. ASP, PHP, 
SQL, JavaScript, VBScript. XHTML, CSS, or oth- 
ers at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: 
An introductory course in computer programming. 
3 credits hours. 

IFS325 Introduction to Networks 

Spring Semester (becomes fall semester course in 

Fall 2011) 

This course provides a broad theoretical overview 
of computer and telecommunications networks. 
The Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) Model is 
used as the primary basis for examining what com- 
munications tasks need to be performed in order for 
electronic communications to occur. The Internet's 
TCP/IP protocol stack is used as the primary exam- 
ple of how the OSI model may be implemented in 
practice. A thorough examination of how the TCP/ 
IP protocols provides the student with a detailed 
understanding of the functioning of packet-based 
networks and the Internet. Lab-based exercises 
are used to demonstrate concepts where possible. 
Prerequisite: One semester of programming with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

iFS335 Advanced Networks Design 

Fall Semester (becomes a spring semester course 

beginning Spring 2012) 



This course provides the student with the ability to 
design and support complex enterprise-wide net- 
working solutions. It studies the conceptual design 
methodologies, planning and complexity involved 
in establishing and supporting organization con- 
nectivity. Emphasis will be on issues relating to 
designing and implementing IP infrastructure, di- 
rectory services, file and print sharing, file system 
security, data storage technologies, and thin cli- 
ent. Consideration will be given to Novell, UNIX/ 
Linux, and Microsoft based network infrastruc- 
tures. Hands-on lab exercises are used extensively 
throughout the course. Prerequisite: IFS325 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS350 Hardware/Software Architectures 

Spring Semester (no longer offered after Spring 
2011) 

This course examines the architectures of modern 
computer hardware and systems software from an 
Information Systems point of view. At the conclu- 
sion of the course, students will know and under- 
stand the role and purpose of the major components 
comprising computer hardware They will also un- 
derstand the purpose of operating systems in con- 
trolling system resources to accomplish input, mem- 
ory allocation/access, processing, and output. This 
course provides a functional overview of hardware 
and software that ties together the overall concept of 
computing. Prerequisite: IFS 160 or IFS200 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS410 End-user Support Management 

Fall Semester (no longer offered after Fall 2011) 

An introduction to the creation and maintenance of 
the end-user support functional area in organiza- 
tions. Topics of discussion include technical sup- 
port in selection of hardware and software, training 
in use of hardware and software, and assistance in 
use of computer information systems in solving 
business problems. Prerequisites: IFS205 with a 
grade of 2.0 or better, and IFS 305 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

IFS425 E-Commerce 

Fall Semester (beginning Fall 2012) 

This course analyzes how organizations use elec- 



Information Systems 397 



tronic commerce to streamline operations, reach 
customers, and increase profitability. Technologies 
utilized in electronic commerce will be examine, 
with particular emphasis on Web-based technolo- 
gies and issues. The organizational, behavioral, 
social, legal, security, and international aspects 
of e-commerce will be discussed. The course will 
mainly focus on e-commerce from a B2B and CRM 
point of view. Prerequisite: IFS305 with a grade of 
2.0 or higher. 

3 credits hours. 

IFS435 Project Management 
Fall Semester (beginning Fall 2012) 

This is an IT and business project management (PM) 
course and is based on the PMBOK core knowl- 
edge areas. The course guides students through the 
application of project management process groups 
including initiating, planning, executing, moni- 
toring and controlling, and closing out a project. 
Key topics include project selection and scoping, 
schedule development, risk management, quality 
planning, team building, project communication, 
progress reporting, and quality and cost manage- 
ment. Students develop a comprehensive IT project 
of their choice using MS Project in a collaborative 
setting. This is a senior-level course of IFS and 
Business majors. Prerequisite: IFS305 with a grade 
of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS440 Business Systems Analysis & Design 

Spring Semester (no longer offered after Spring 
2012) 

This course covers the concept of the computer 
systems development life cycle, including the 
analysis, design, and implementation of business 
software systems. The project management meth- 
odology will be used in the context of Informa- 
tion Technology projects such as installing and/or 
upgrading operational software, selecting systems 
development or acquisition solutions, implementa- 
tion of eLearning web-based systems, or surveying 
end-user needs requirements. Individual assign- 
ments and a group project will be required. This is 
a writing/communications-intensive course. This is 
a capstone course and should be taken in the final 
semester. Prerequisite: IFS305 or IFS350 with a 
grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 



IFS460 Database Management Systems 
Fall Semester (no longer offered after Fall 2011) 

A comprehensive discussion of relational database 
theory and design. Emphasis is on data structure and 
design for building robust and flexible data reposi- 
tories. Semester-long projects will use popular data- 
base software. This course is designed to stimulate 
the critical thinking skills of the student. Prerequi- 
site: IFS305 or IFS350 with a grade of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS465 Business Analytics and Data Mining 

Spring Semester (beginning Spring 2013) 

This course presents a multidisciplinary (manage- 
ment, marketing, operations, finance, and statisti- 
cal assessment) approach to the analysis of both 
structured and unstructured data. It focuses on 
the increasing need for businesses to search for, 
extract, analyze, and present complex ideas from 
raw sources of data. By applying a cross-functional 
technical and managerial perspective, the aspects 
of data mining, data warehousing, and visualization 
are rigorously defined and presented via lectures, 
examples, cases, and assignments to enable the stu- 
dent to conduct a wide variety of assessments in 
support of business operations and decision mak- 
ing. Prerequisite: IFS285 and IFS325 with grades 
of 2.0 or higher. 
3 credit hours. 

IFS470 Selected Topics in Information 
Systems 

This course is a seminar in IFS intended to provide 
coverage of topics of special interest or noteworthy 
significance in the IFS field. Course requirements 
will generally include a course project. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing in the major or permission of the in- 
structor. 

3 credit hours. 

IFS475 Information Security and Ethics 

Spring Semester (beginning Spring 2013) 

This course introduces the technical, managerial, 
and ethical aspects of information security and as- 
surance. It provides the foundation for discussing the 
issues related to protecting the technical aspects of 
information resources, managing the cost/benefit re- 
lationship in protecting those resources and respond- 
ing to security incidents, and evaluating the ethical 
issues related to lack of access to resources and the 



398 Course Descriptions 



privacy rights of customers, employees, and the gen- 
eral public. Prerequisite: IFS305 with a grade of 2.0 
or higher. 

3 credit hours. 

IFS490, IFS491 Information System 
Internship I and II 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

Planned and supervised work experience in a com- 
puterized systems environment at selected cooperat- 
ing firms. Internships require students to meet peri- 
odically with a faculty supervisor, provide a written 
deliverable, and participate in an end-of-internship 
evaluation. Prerequisite: Junior standing and de- 
partmental approval of each student participant's 
individual program. The program requires approxi- 
mately 10 hours per week for 12 weeks. Grading 
will be pass/fail. 

3 credit hours each semester. 



IFS492, IFS493 Information System 
Internship I and II 

Planned and supervised work experience in a com- 
puterized systems environment at selected cooperat- 
ing firms. Internships require students to meet peri- 
odically with a faculty supervisor, provide a written 
deliverable, and participate in an end-of-internship 
evaluation. The program requires approximately 
10 hours per week for 12 weeks. Students admit- 
ted to the Dual Degree Program must also schedule 
MBA506 with IFS492 and MBA507 with IFS493 to 
fulfill the work experience requirement. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing and departmental approval of each 
student participant's individual program. Grading 
will be pass/fail. 

3 credit hours each semester. 



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 



IBS200 Principles of international Business 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course provides an introductory overview of 
how the global business environment impacts deci- 
sion making and planning within the multinational 
firm. Topics include: economic reasons for global 
trade, environmental factors that impact decision 
making (economic, cultural, political, legal), foreign 
market penetration strategies, and international con- 
siderations in a variety of business areas (finance, 
organizational design, staffing, marketing, strategic 
planning). 

3 credit hours. 

IBS361 Global Supply Chain Management 
(see Management Course Description 
Section) 



IBS370 International Marketing (see 
Marketing Course Description Section) 

IBS375 International Management (see 
Management Course Description Section) 

IBS401 International Economics (see 
Economics Course Description Section) 

IBS405 International Finance (see Finance 
Course Description Section) 

IBS410 International Entrepreneurship (see 
Entrepreneurship Course Description Section) 

IBS415 International Accounting (see 
Accounting Course Description Section) 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

INT143 Introduction to Africa 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the 
people, cultures, art, music, history, and politics of 
the countries of Africa. 



3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

INT144 Introduction to East Asia 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the 



Languages 399 



people, cultures, art. music, history, and politics of 
East Asia, including China, Japan, and Korea. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

INT145 Introduction to Latin America 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the 
people, cultures, art, music, history, and politics of 
the countries of Latin America. 

3 credit liours. Satisfies ADR V. 

INT146 Introduction to the Middle East 
Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the 
people, cultures, art, music, history, and politics of 
the countries of the Middle East. 

3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 



INT147 Introduction to Russia 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the 
people, cultures, art, music, history, and politics Rus- 
sia and other countries of the former Soviet Union. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

INT150 Introduction to South Asia 

Fall-Spring Semesters 

This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the 
people, culture, art, music, history, and politics of the 
countries of South Asia sub-continent, including In- 
dia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and other nations. 
3 credit hours. Satisfies ADR V. 

Upper-level International Studies 

For students who wish to pursue upper-division In- 
ternational Studies courses, see the Political Science 
offerings. 



LANGUAGES 



The College offers a baccalaureate major in Span- 
ish and minors in Spanish, French, and German. El- 
ementary-level courses in Italian, Latin, and Russian 
are offered on a regular basis. 

The first year of foreign language study empha- 
sizes the acquisition of rudimentary proficiency 
in listening comprehension, reading comprehen- 
sion, and speaking. In intermediate and advanced 
courses, continued emphasis is placed on oral and 
written expression, along with an appreciation o